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List of Papers

[Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.

GENERAL

Proposal by the President to the Senate That the United States Adhere to the Protocol of Signature Establishing the Permanent Court of International Justice

Date and number Subject Page
1922 July 21 From the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Report of conversation with Balfour and other British officials: Taft’s suggestion that in order to obtain U. S. participation in Permanent Court arrangement, the Court must be separated from the League of Nations so that nonmembers of the League might participate in selection of Court judges. Balfour’s request for note outlining suggestion.
1
Aug. 1 To the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Concurrence in views expressed to British officials. Suggestion that arrangement for U. S. participation might be made analogous to that with respect to mandates.
2
Sept. 27 From the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Letter to Earl Balfour, September 14 (text printed) quoting communication from Elihu Root outlining a procedure for American entry into Court. Similar letter to Lord Cecil.
3
Nov. 16 From the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Letter from Lord Cecil (text printed) commenting on Root’s proposal and suggesting consideration of Lord Phillimore’s proposal providing for immediate U. S. cooperation in Court by adherence to protocol of signature with reservation as to participation in future election of judges.
5
1923 Feb. 17 To President Harding
History of establishment of Court; objections to U. S. adherence to protocol and acceptance of statute in present form; recommendation that United States adhere to protocol accepting statute, but not the optional clause, with reservations and understandings concerning U. S. freedom from legal involvement with the League, U. S. participation in election of judges, U. S. share in Court expenses, and amendment of statute only with U. S. consent.
10
Feb. 24 President Harding to the Senate
Request for Senate’s consent to U. S. adhesion to protocol under conditions and with reservations suggested by the Secretary of State.
17
Mar. 1 To President Harding
Recommendation that negative replies be made to inquiries of Senate Committee on Foreign Relations as to whether: (1) The administration favors negotiation of a treaty creating compulsory arbitration; (2) the administration proposes to recognize part XIII (Labor) of the Treaty of Versailles as binding; and (3) any other countries have made reservations on adhering to protocol.
19
[Page XXVI]Mar. 5 From President Harding
Acknowledgment of Secretary’s reply to Senate Committee’s inquiries.
24

Discussion With the British and Japanese Governments Regarding a Proposed Increase in Gun Elevation on Capital Ships Retained Under the Washington Naval Treaty

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the British Ambassador, March 5, 1923
The Ambassador’s reference to reports concerning increased elevation of British turret guns, made public in speech of Secretary of State at New Haven, December 29, 1922, and in remarks by Secretary of Navy before House Committee; his denial of such alterations. The Secretary’s request for information from British Admiralty regarding guns, in accordance with letter from Secretary of Navy (text printed) and also for memorandum of Ambassador’s denial.
24
Mar. 15 From the British Embassy
Categorical declaration that no alterations had been made in gun elevations of any British capital ships since construction.
26
Mar. 20 To the British Embassy
Statements for press by Secretary of State and Secretary of Navy (texts printed) presenting British denial of increases in gun elevation on capital ships, as correction of previous statements.
30
Apr. 26 Statement Issued to the Press by the Navy Department
Decision not to use money appropriated by Congress for elevation of guns of U. S. fleet until directed to do so by Congress.
31
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, May 3, 1923
Japanese Government’s unwillingness to negotiate special agreement with United States to limit increase of gun elevation on ships retained under treaty.
32

Refusal by the United States To Ratify the Convention for the Control of the Trade in Arms and Ammunition, Signed September 10, 1919

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 1 From the Acting President of the Council of the League of Nations
Request that the United States express its objections to provisions of convention and state basis on which it would be willing to cooperate for control of manufacture and export of arms.
34
[Page XXVII]Aug. 3 From the Acting Secretary of Commerce
Endorsement of previous U. S. action, in reply to request of Secretary of State for views on League communication of May 1.
37
Sept. 7 From the Secretary of the Navy
Opinion that no useful purpose would be served by U. S. entry into general treaty attempting to limit arms traffic, in reply to request of Secretary of State for views on League communication of May 1.
38
Sept. 12 (53) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Note for Secretary General of the League (text printed) outlining U. S. objections to provisions of convention.
38
Sept. 26 From the Secretary of War
View that compliance with League request would serve no useful purpose.
40
Sept. 27 (61) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Publication of U. S. note of September 12 to the League; press statement (text printed) explaining refusal to ratify convention and describing U. S. efforts to control arms traffic.
(Instructions to mail note and press statement to London, Paris, and Rome.)
42
Dec. 14 From the Acting President of the Council of the League of Nations
Failure of United States to suggest basis for cooperation. Invitation to appoint U. S. experts to cooperate with Temporary Mixed Commission in preparation of new convention.
43
Dec. 15 (1290) From the Minister in Switzerland
Letter from Secretary General of League, December 14 (text printed) suggesting procedure for appointment of U. S. members to Temporary Mixed Commission.
45

American Representation on the International Commission for the Revision of the Rules of Warfare

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Sept. 5 To the Secretary of War
Suggestion that Departments of State, War, and Navy embody views on revision of rules of warfare in report for guidance of J. B. Moore, appointed U. S. Commissioner to attend meeting of Commission of Jurists at The Hague, December 10, 1922.
(The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Secretary of the Navy.)
47
Nov. 1 (3809–959:190–1) From the Secretary of the Navy
Rules for use of radio in war, submitted by General Board of the Navy Department (text printed) and approved by Secretary of the Navy.
48
[Page XXVIII]Nov. 6 (WPD 375–10) From the Secretary of War
Rules for the use of radio in war, submitted by Army representatives (text printed) and approved by Secretary of War.
49
Nov. 14 (WPD 375–15) From the Acting Secretary of War
Rules to govern use of aircraft in war, submitted by Army representatives (text printed) and approved by Acting Secretary of War.
51
Nov. 20 (Op–12B 3809–959:190) From the Secretary of the Navy
Rules for use of aircraft in war formulated by General Board and approved by Navy Department.
59
Nov. 20 To the American Representative on the Commission of Jurists
Transmittal of copies of rules proposed by War and Navy Departments, with instructions to be guided by them and to attempt to reach a compromise when proposals differ. Department’s desire that Commission’s discussions be limited to aviation and radio.
63
1923 Feb. 26 From the American Delegates on the Commission of Jurists
Transmittal of General Report of Commission (extracts printed) containing codes of rules to regulate use of radio and aircraft in war. Appointment of Washburn as second U. S. Commissioner.
66
May 19 (SC 226–110) From the Secretary of the Navy
General approval of draft codes; suggestion that General Report be published and that codes be embodied in a treaty.
87
Sept. 27 (WPD 375–33) From the Secretary of War
General approval of draft codes and willingness that they be embodied in a treaty.
88

Participation by Delegates From the United States in the Deliberations of the League of Nations Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Oct. 14 (12A/23596/10346) From the Secretary General of the League of Nations
Invitation to United States to nominate a member to serve on Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium. Brief account of creation of Committee and its accomplishments.
89
Dec. 9 (74) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to notify Secretary General of League of Dr. Rupert Blue’s appointment to cooperate with Advisory Committee in unofficial and consultative capacity at January meeting.
93
Dec. 14 To the Secretary of the Treasury
General statement for Secretary and for Dr. Blue on U. S. interest in opium problem, primarily as a problem of national protection and control and secondarily as an international problem.
94
[Page XXIX]Dec. 15 From the Secretary of the Treasury
Approval of views expressed in letter of December 14, and transmittal of the letter to Dr. Blue.
97
1923 May 10 To the American Delegation at the Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium
Selection to attend meeting of Advisory Committee, May 24, in consultative capacity. Instructions concerning presentation of statement of U. S. position (text printed) and introduction of U. S. resolutions (text printed).
97
May 25 From the Chief of the American Delegation to the Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium (tel.)
Presentation of statement of U. S. position; Bishop Brent’s statement on moral aspects of opium traffic.
104
May 27 From the Chief of the American Delegation at the Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium (tel.)
Presentation of U. S. proposals; objections by India and others. Intention to challenge India’s right to vote if such vote on proposals is decisive.
104
May 29 To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
For Porter: Caution against challenging India’s right to vote, since United States is represented in consultative capacity only.
105
June 6 From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Porter: Advisory Committee’s resolution (extracts printed) accepting U. S. proposals, with reservations, and recommending negotiation of agreements (a) to limit manufacture, importation for manufacture, and production for export of opium and other drugs, and (b) to reduce importations of raw opium where temporarily continued and to adopt measures for control by China.
105
June 8 To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
For Porter: Expression of gratification at results of meeting.
107
Aug. 9 (57) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
League’s invitation, August 7, to the United States (text printed) to have representatives in Geneva at the time of the meetings of the Fifth Committee of the Assembly.
107
Aug. 17 (39) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Acceptance of League’s invitation; expectation that Congressman Porter, Bishop Brent, and Dr. Blue will represent United States.
108
Aug. 24 To the American Delegation at the Meeting of the Fifth Committee of the Assembly of the League of Nations
Selection to represent United States in consultative capacity at meetings of Fifth Committee of the Assembly; instructions as to U. S. policy.
109
Undated [Rec’d Sept.21] From the Chief of the American Delegation at the Meeting of the Fifth Committee of the Assembly of the League of Nations (tel.)
Resolutions adopted by the Fifth Committee of the Assembly providing for the calling of two conferences to conclude agreements recommended by Advisory Committee.
109
[Page XXX]

Approval by the United States of a Project for Cooperation Between the International Office of Public Health and the Health Commission of the League of Nations

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Apr. 20 From the French Ambassador
Resolution, December 10, 1920, of the First Assembly of the League of Nations providing for the creation of an international health office. Request for U. S. approval of project of placing under the League the International Office of Public Health established at Paris under the convention of 1907.
110
May 12 To the French Ambassador
Statement that departure from 1907 convention would require sanction of President and Senate, which has not been given.
111
1923 Aug. 7 From the French Chargé
Request for U. S. agreement to scheme of collaboration between International Office of Public Health and Health Committee of League of Nations drawn up at mixed meeting held at Paris.
112
Aug. 21 To President Coolidge
Explanation of scheme of collaboration between two health organizations. Request for President’s views.
113
Aug. 21 From President Coolidge
Approval of scheme of collaboration.
114
Aug. 31 To the French Chargé
Approval of scheme of collaboration, with understanding as to autonomy of International Office of Public Health.
115

Appointment of American Delegates to the International Emigration and Immigration Conference To Be Convened at Rome

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Undated [Rec’d Apr. 9] From the Italian Embassy
Proposal of an international conference to consider technical problems connected with emigration and immigration.
115
May 10 To the Italian Embassy
Willingness of United States to participate in conference, with reservations as to right to treat reception of immigrants within the United States as domestic matter.
117
June 22 From the Italian Ambassador
Formal invitation to conference, with further assurances of its purely technical nature.
118
Oct. 13 (409) To the Chargé in Italy
Information concerning U. S. refusal to participate in preliminary conference at Paris suggested by France.
118
Undated [Rec’d Oct. 18] From the Italian Embassy
Inquiry concerning U. S. attitude toward a preliminary meeting of experts to be held somewhere in Italy.
119
Oct. 26 To the Italian Embassy
Refusal to participate in proposed preliminary meeting of experts.
120
Dec. 26 To the Italian Ambassador
List of the U. S. delegates to conference.
120
[Page XXXI]

Decision by the United States To Adopt an Unconditional Most-Favored-Nation Policy in the Negotiation of New Commercial Treaties

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Dec. 14 From the Acting Chairman of the Tariff Commission
Recommendation that the United States abandon conditional most-favored-nation principle as basis of commercial treaties in favor of principle of unconditional most-favored-nation treatment.
121
1923 Jan. 8 From Senator Henry Cabot Lodge
Comments on recommendations made December 14 by the Acting Chairman of the Tariff Commission.
126
Jan. 15 To President Harding
Information concerning necessity for negotiation of certain new commercial treaties and for revision of long-standing treaties; opinion that United States should adopt unconditional form of most-favored-nation clause in these treaties.
127
Feb. 27 From President Harding
Authorization to proceed with negotiations upon unconditional policy; consideration of effect this change in policy would have upon reciprocity arrangement with Cuba.
128
Mar. 2 To President Harding
Intention to negotiate treaties which would except the reciprocity arrangement with Cuba from operation of unconditional most-favored-nation clause; possibility that other powers may request similar exceptions.
129
Mar. 5 From President Harding
Authorization to proceed with negotiations along lines already approved, although preservation of reciprocity arrangement with Cuba may cause some embarrassment.
130
Aug. 18 To American Diplomatic Officers
Information concerning decision to adopt unconditional most-favored-nation policy in the negotiation of new commercial treaties. Request for comments on desirability of undertaking negotiations with country to which accredited.
131

Prevention of the Illegal Importation of Liquor Into the United States

proposal by the united states to other powers to sanction by treaty the right to search foreign ships within 12 miles from shore for the prevention of liquor smuggling

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 3 To the Chiefs of Foreign Missions in the United States
Treasury notice (text printed) that Supreme Court, in opinion of April 30 construing Prohibition Act, holds it unlawful for any vessel to bring within U. S. territorial waters any liquor for beverage purposes; and that regulations for effecting decision will be promulgated shortly and become effective June 10.
(Footnote: The Treasury notice was sent also to all U. S. diplomatic officers and consuls.)
133
[Page XXXII]Undated [Rec’d May 11] (44–07) From the Spanish Ambassador
Protest against Supreme Court decision as violating international law and probably causing loss to Spanish ships.
133
May 18 To the Spanish Ambassador
Information that in cases where vessels cleared foreign ports prior to promulgation of Supreme Court decision, seizure will not be made if liquor is kept under seal while in U. S. territorial waters.
134
May 25 (410) From the British Ambassador
Protest against Supreme Court decision as contrary to principle stated in excerpt from Supreme Court’s judgment in Wildenhus case, 1886, and as leading to imposition of conflicting national laws on shipping.
135
May 28 From the Belgian Ambassador
Protest against Supreme Court decision as creating difficulties for Belgian ships and as establishing dangerous precedent.
136
May 29 From the Italian Embassy
Protest against Supreme Court decision as unwarranted limitation of Italy’s freedom of commerce and navigation.
138
May 29 To American Diplomatic Officers (tel.)
Instructions to transmit to Foreign Office, repeat to consuls, and give widest publicity to paragraph from Treasury regulations effecting Supreme Court decision (text printed), which declares that liquor on vessels leaving foreign ports before June 10 will not be seized.
139
May 31 From the Swedish Legation
Protest against Supreme Court decision as introducing dangerous precedent in international voyages.
139
May 31 From the Portuguese Legation
Protest against Supreme Court decision as causing inconvenience to Portuguese vessels.
140
June 1 (151) From the Danish Minister
Protest against Supreme Court decision as contrary to international usage stated in excerpt from Wildenhus case, and as causing hardships to Danish ships legally bound to carry liquor for crew.
140
June 1 (1763) From the Netherland Minister
Protest against Supreme Court decision as contrary to international comity and exigencies of intercourse.
142
June 1 (1764) From the Netherland Minister
Further protest against Supreme Court decision.
143
June 6 To the British Ambassador
Inability of Executive to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act. Assumption that next Congress will give attention to operation of act. Quotation of another excerpt from Wildenhus case as upholding U. S. position.
144
[Page XXXIII]June 7 From the Norwegian Chargé
Protest against Supreme Court decision as departing from common practice and establishing dangerous precedent. Assumption that regulations do not apply to medicinal liquors, as legally required on Norwegian ships.
145
June 9 To the Belgian Ambassador
Inability of Executive to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act. Assumption that next Congress will give attention to operation of act.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Netherland Minister and the Norwegian Chargé)
145
June 9 To the Swedish Legation
Inability of Executive to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act. Assumption that next Congress will give attention to operation of act.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Italian Embassy and Portuguese Legation.)
146
June 9 (7509) From the Chargé in Mexico
Mexican note, June 5 (text printed) protesting against Supreme Court decision and citing understanding reached by United States and Mexico in Harvester case.
147
June 9 (26) To the Ambassador in Spain (tel.)
Proposal to negotiate treaties with maritime powers granting right to carry liquors under seal within U. S. waters in return for right of visit and search within 12 miles of shore. Historic precedent for such action.
149
June 9 (27) To the Ambassador in Spain (tel.)
Proposed treaty with Spain (text printed) providing (1) that authorities of either nation may visit and search ships of other within 12 miles of coast and (2) that articles importation of which is prohibited may be brought within 12 miles of coast under seal.
150
June 12 To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Proposal to negotiate treaties with maritime powers granting right to carry liquors under seal within U. S. waters in return for right of visit and search within 12 miles of shore. Historic precedent for such action.
(Instructions to repeat to London and Rome and in part to Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and Sweden.)
152
June 12 (228) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Presentation of proposed treaty to Ambassadors of Great Britain, France, Italy, Japan, and Spain, whose replies are awaited before other Governments are approached.
(Sent also to Great Britain, Italy, and Japan. Instructions to Ambassador in France to repeat to Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Portugal.)
154
June 12 (229) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Articles I and II of proposed treaty (text printed).
(Instructions to repeat to London and Rome.)
155
[Page XXXIV]Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, June 12, 1923
Secretary’s explanation of proposed treaty and presentation of copy to Ambassador.
156
June 13 To the Norwegian Chargé
Request for copies of Norwegian laws and regulations requiring Norwegian ships to carry liquors for medicinal purposes.
158
June 16 To the Danish Minister
Inability of Executive to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act. Assumption that next Congress will give attention to operation of act. Quotation of excerpt from Wildenhus case as upholding U. S. position. Request for copies of Danish laws and regulations requiring that liquor be carried for crews.
158
June 20 From the Panaman Minister
Protest against Supreme Court decision. Willingness to cooperate to insure operation of prohibition law.
159
June 28 To the Panaman Minister
Inability of Executive to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act. Appreciation of offer of cooperation.
160
June 28 (300) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Favorable attitude of Foreign Office toward proposed treaty; French suggestion that 12-mile limit be reduced in English Channel to leave international waterway in center.
161
June 30 (543) From the British Chargé
Protest against U. S. refusal to permit the Tuscania to carry wine required by Italian medical laws for vessels entering Italian ports with steerage passengers aboard.
161
July 3 (2472) To the Chargé in Mexico
Instructions to inform Mexican Government of Executive’s inability to discuss international legality of Prohibition Act; and to state that understanding reached in Harvester case is irrelevant.
162
July 10 (578) From the British Chargé
Statement that any attempt on the part of the United States to seize a British ship outside the 3–mile limit would be regarded by Great Britain as creating a very serious incident. Explanation that no protest was made in Henry L. Marshall condemnation because vessel was not of British registry.
163
July 14 From the British Embassy
Objections to proposed treaty.
164
July 16 To the British Chargé
Résumé of facts in Henry L. Marshall case as set forth in statement of case by U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Hope that Great Britain will not espouse cause of merchant ships, even of valid British registry, when similarly engaged.
165
July 20 (193) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to deliver to Foreign Office a copy of note sent to British Embassy, July 19 (text printed) replying to British objections to proposed treaty.
168
[Page XXXV]July 25 From the Portuguese Minister
Memorandum (text printed) expressing reservations to any alteration by unilateral action of accepted principles of international law; and hope that means will be found to adapt U. S. law to common practice.
170
July 27 To the British Chargé
Information concerning order issued to Surgeon General (text printed) authorizing U. S. Public Health Service officers to allow such use of liquors for medicinal purposes on foreign vessels in U. S. territorial waters as laws and regulations of home port prescribe.
171
Aug. 25 (961) To the Chargé in Great Britain
Information that only amelioration possible in enforcement of prohibition law is by act of Congress or ratification of treaties proposed. Citation of precedents for extending territorial jurisdiction and for seizures. Instructions to report British views; also possible nature of British reply to treaty proposal.
172
Sept. 10 To the Chargé in France
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by France; also French views on U. S. treaty proposal.
179
Sept. 10 To the Ambassador in Spain
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Spain; also Spanish views on U. S. treaty proposals.
181
Sept. 10 To the Ambassador in Belgium
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Belgium; also Belgian views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
182
Sept. 10 To the Minister in the Netherlands
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by the Netherlands; also Netherland views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
183
Sept. 10 To the Minister in Sweden
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Sweden; also Swedish views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
184
Sept. 10 To the Ambassador in Italy
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Italy; also Italian views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
184
Sept. 10 To the Minister in Denmark
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Denmark; also Danish views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
185
Sept. 10 To the Chargé in Portugal
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Portugal; also Portuguese views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
186
[Page XXXVI]Sept. 10 To the Minister in Norway
Instructions to forward information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Norway; also Norwegian views concerning U. S. treaty proposal.
187
Sept. 17 (797) From the British Chargé
Refusal to agree to extension of 3-mile limit until matter has been submitted to Imperial Conference.
188
Oct. 3 (107) From the Minister in the Netherlands
Favorable attitude of Minister for Foreign Affairs toward proposed treaty; information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by the Netherlands.
191
Oct. 6 (3585) From the Chargé in France
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by France; French desire for more latitude for French ships in U. S. ports and suggestion that treaty provide for exemption of large vessels from interference beyond 3-mile limit.
193
Oct. 13 (794) From the Chargé in Italy
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Italy.
195
Oct. 22 (295) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Minor changes and modifications in articles of proposed treaty, as telegraphed to the Netherlands. Instructions to make similar changes in draft treaty to be submitted to Great Britain.
197
Oct. 22 (52) To the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Instructions to submit to Netherlands articles (text printed) as basis for treaty.
198
Oct. 22 (127) From the Minister in the Netherlands
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by the Netherlands.
200
Oct. 24 (555) From the Minister in Portugal
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Portugal.
202
Oct. 29 (921) From the British Chargé
Denial of truth of press report that Great Britain has accepted in principle U. S. proposal for 12-mile limit. Information of appointment of special committee by Imperial Conference to consider matter.
203
Nov. 5 (419) From the Ambassador in Belgium
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Belgium. Belief that Belgium would follow lead of Great Britain in concluding treaty.
204
Nov. 7 (413) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform Foreign Office that proposed treaty gives latitude to French vessels in U. S. ports carrying wine and liquors and exempts large vessels from subjection to unusual interference. Minor changes and modifications in articles of treaty as submitted to Great Britain and the Netherlands.
205
[Page XXXVII]Nov. 7 (329) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to add changes to treaty stipulating that only vessels hovering off coasts will be boarded.
(Instructions to repeat to The Hague.)
208
Nov. 10 (503) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Excerpt from official summary of Imperial Conference (text printed) announcing beginning of negotiations with United States for extension of right of search beyond 3-mile limit.
209
Nov. 19 (606) From the Chargé in Denmark
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Denmark.
209
Nov. 21 (429) To the Chargé in Italy
Request that convention cited as basis for Italian claim to maritime jurisdiction be identified.
(Footnote: Failure of efforts to identify convention.)
210
Nov. 21 (72) From the Chargé in Sweden
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Sweden.
211
Nov. 22 (64) From the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Decision of Cabinet to recommend acceptance of proposed treaty. Delay in negotiations pending receipt of information as to status of negotiations with Great Britain.
212
Nov. 23 (58) To the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Belief that negotiations with Great Britain are proceeding favorably.
212
Nov. 23 (1005) From the British Chargé
Request for assurances as to constitutional validity of concession the treaty proposes to grant British ships trading in U. S. waters, in view of Supreme Court decision of April 30.
213
Nov. 26 To the British Chargé
Opinion as to constitutional validity of proposed treaty concessions; assurances concerning abrogation of treaty should proposed concession become inoperative either by judicial decision or act of Congress.
214
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 3] British Draft of a Treaty to Extend the Right of Search at Sea
Articles permitting, in return for right to carry sealed liquors, visit and search of British vessels within distance from shore traversable in 1 hour by vessel suspected of committing offense.
217
Dec. 5 (66) From the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Letter from Minister for Foreign Affairs (text printed) proposing modifications in treaty; his suggestion for semiofficial announcement of opening of negotiations (text printed).
219
Undated To the British Chargé
Acceptance of certain articles of British draft; suggested modification of others.
221
[Page XXXVIII]Dec. 7 (61) To the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Approved announcement of opening of negotiations (text printed) broadened to show reciprocal nature of proposal. Instructions to arrange for publication; also to delay proceedings at The Hague pending conclusion of negotiations with Great Britain.
223
Dec. 8 (370) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Apparent intention of Foreign Office to conclude treaty at Washington. Instructions to make clear, should occasion arise, that modifications suggested by United States on December 3 are deemed absolutely necessary.
223
Dec. 11 (309) From the Minister in Norway
Information concerning extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Norway.
224
1924 Mar. 4 (271) From the Chargé in Spain
Foreign Office note verbale, February 28, 1924, and memorandum of the Embassy (texts printed) containing information regarding extent of territorial jurisdiction claimed by Spain.
225

conference at ottawa between american and canadian officials for the discussion of means for preventing the smuggling of liquor

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 7 To the British Ambassador
Inquiry whether Canada would be disposed to refuse clearances to vessels carrying liquor destined for U. S. ports unless permit is presented.
228
June 19 (494) From the British Ambassador
Canada’s inability under existing laws to refuse clearances as requested.
229
July 16 (593) From the British Chargé
Information that note no. 494, June 19, referred only to existing Canadian laws; invitation to send representative to Ottawa to confer on situation.
230
July 19 To the British Chargé
Acceptance of invitation to send representative to Ottawa.
231
Aug. 9 (670) From the British Chargé
Request that importation of liquor into Yukon Territory via Skagway, Alaska, be authorized.
231
Sept. 13 To the British Chargé
Refusal of request, there being no authority of law for permitting transportation of liquor through Skagway.
232
Nov. 24 To the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury
Designations as U. S. representative to attend Ottawa Conference; list of expert assistants; instructions and information concerning U. S. proposals.
233
[Page XXXIX]Dec. 29 From the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury
Report on discussions at Ottawa Conference. Statement made by him November 30 at close of conference (text printed). Draft of proposed treaty (text printed).
240

arrangement between the united states and cuba for the exchange of information useful in suppressing trade in prohibited goods

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 14 (53) To the Ambassador in Cuba
British view that contemplated exchange of information concerning vessels, cargoes, etc., if adopted by Great Britain and United States alone, would merely divert smuggling to Cuba and elsewhere. Instructions to propose similar exchange of information with Cuban Government.
255
Aug. 3 (235) From the Chargé in Cuba
Cuba’s willingness to enter into proposed arrangement; information that details are being worked out.
256
Sept. 11 (317) From the Chargé in Cuba
Suggestion that full information be forwarded should Department desire arrangement with Cuba similar to that with Canada, as reported in press, whereby Canada will in future prohibit exportation of liquor on ships of less than 250 tons.
257
Oct. 2 (128) To the Chargé in Cuba
Information that Department has no record of Canadian restriction reported in press. Inquiry whether Cuba grants clearances to vessels carrying liquor destined for U. S. ports and also whether Cuba would be disposed to include in arrangement for exchange of information a provision denying such clearances.
257
Oct. 19 (398) From the Chargé in Cuba
Notes exchanged with Cuban Secretary of State July 7 and August 4 (texts printed) providing for reciprocal exchange of information. Belief that Government is favorably disposed toward other proposals under consideration.
259
Nov. 14 (149) To the Chargé in Cuba
Instructions to report whether Cuba will include in reciprocal arrangement a provision refusing clearances to ships bearing liquors for U. S. ports and will issue a regulation similar to Canadian regulation of September 19 (text printed) prohibiting exportation under certain conditions of liquors on vessels under 200 tons.
261
Dec. 6 (535) From the Chargé in Cuba
Possibility that exportation of liquors on small vessels may be prohibited by Presidential decree. Clearance of ships bearing liquors for U. S. ports in effect prevented by requirement of landing certificate.
262
[Page XL]

Status in Foreign Countries of Vessels and Representatives of the United States Shipping Board

Date and number Subject Page
1920 May 21 (722) To Consular Officers
Instructions concerning accident reports and legal proceedings conducted for the United States Shipping Board.
263
1923 Jan. 11 (D. 171; C. 871) To Diplomatic and Consular Officers
Definition of status and immunities in foreign countries of U. S. Shipping Board vessels and representatives.
267
Mar. 5 (178) To Diplomatic Officers
Instructions to inform Government to which accredited that although U. S. Shipping Board vessels will not be regarded as immune, United States reserves right to aid vessels as provided in section 7 of Suits in Admiralty Act.
270
July 7 To the British Chargé
Explanation, in reply to inquiry, that under Suits in Admiralty Act, Government practice has been to pay bail or its equivalent and admiralty judgments for commercially engaged Shipping Board vessels involved in suits in foreign courts.
271

Negotiations on Behalf of the World War Foreign Debt Commission for the Settlement or Refunding of Debts Owed the United States by Foreign Governments

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 27 (457) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Information that Estonian Government will soon appoint representative to negotiate debt settlement with United States.
272
Aug. 7 (31) To the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (tel.)
Note for Latvian Foreign Office (text printed) inquiring whether payments are being made to Government of Great Britain on obligations similar to those held by U. S. Government.
(Instructions to send similar notes to Estonia and Lithuania.)
272
Aug. 29 (1186) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Note from Latvian Foreign Office proposing that negotiations on debt question be carried on in Riga.
273
Sept. 15 (1275) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Information concerning Lithuania’s obligations to Great Britain; Lithuanian representative’s intention to proceed to Washington and intimation of understanding with United States that repayment of indebtedness would not be asked until reparations had been paid by Germany. Request for copy of Lithuanian note showing indebtedness to United States.
273
Oct. 10 (1343) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Note from Lithuanian Foreign Office stating that interest is being paid on certain obligations held by British Government but that obligations are not of same nature as those held by U. S. Government.
275
[Page XLI]Oct. 20 (48) To the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (tel.)
Note for Latvian Foreign Office (text printed) explaining inability of Debt Commission to conduct negotiations in Europe and its willingness to negotiate at Washington at early date; and pointing out U. S. understanding that no other country has prior claims to debt payment.
275
Nov. 7 (78) To the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Instructions to inform Lithuanian Government that U. S. Government has no understanding that repayment of loans is contingent on Lithuania’s receipt of German reparations. List of Lithuanian obligations held by U. S. Treasury.
276
Dec. 6 (88) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (tel.)
Information that Estonian Minister will sail for United States December 18, with full powers to negotiate debt settlement.
277
Dec. 7 (1540) From the Minister in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
Presumption that clause in obligations (text printed) is being misconstrued by Lithuania to mean that no payments are due on loan until reparations are received.
277

Reservation by the United States of Its Rights to Wrangell Island

Date and number Subject Page
1916 Dec. 2 (479) From the Ambassador in Russia
Circular notice of Russian Government dated October 3, 1916, as quoted in the Kronstadtskii Vyestnik of October 16, announcing the inclusion in the Russian Empire of Wrangell and other newly discovered islands in the Arctic Ocean (text printed).
278
1922 Mar. 30 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Russian Affairs, Department of State
Receipt of memorandum from Russian Embassy, March 30, 1922 (text printed) referring to press report that British flag had been raised on Wrangell Island by Stefansson expedition and island proclaimed part of the British Empire, justification being that survivors of Canadian Karluk remained there 8 months in 1914; statement of Russian claims based on location.
279
Sept. 12 (643) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Instructions to make formal inquiry regarding British views on subject of Wrangell Island, especially in view of recent Canadian statement indicating possible intention to claim ownership; reservation of U. S. rights to island, on which American party first to land and raise flag; readiness to discuss island’s status.
281
1923 Jan. 18 (781) To the Chargé in Great Britain
Instructions to renew inquiry regarding Wrangell Island, in view of statement appearing in Whitaker’s Almanack for 1923 (text printed) mentioning the hoisting of British flag on island in 1921 and the notification of annexation to Canada in 1922.
283
[Page XLII]Mar. 28 (840) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Instruction to report immediately concerning steps taken in regard to instructions of September 12, 1922, and January 18, 1923, on the subject of Wrangell Island. Information that new map of world published by Department of Interior of Canada shows Wrangell Island as British possession.
283
Apr. 11 (2251) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Report on communications with Foreign Office in effort to ascertain views on Wrangell Island; press report that Stefansson is being sent to London by Canadian Government to discuss Canada’s claim to island and its value from strategic point of view.
284
May 17 (895) To the Chargé in Great Britain
Instruction to press for British statement of views on Wrangell Island.
285
Aug. 28 (2802) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Inability to get definite statement of British views; belief that matter has assumed importance and that British views are divided.
(Footnote: Indirect assurances May 27, 1925, that British will not claim Wrangell Island.)
285

Preliminaries to the Assembling op the Fifth International Conference of American States at Santiago, Chile

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Dec. 15 (253) From the Chilean Ambassador
Invitation to U. S. Government to be represented at Fifth Pan American Conference, to be held at Santiago, March 25, 1923.
286
Dec. 19 (87) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Unwillingness of Peru to participate in conference unless Chilean activities against Peruvian population of Tacna, Arica, and Tarata cease.
287
Dec. 20 To the Chilean Ambassador
Acceptance of invitation to conference.
(Footnote: List of delegates.)
288
Dec. 21 (88) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Chile’s second telegram to Peru deploring Peru’s attitude of complaint against Chile; Peru’s reply maintaining attitude.
288
1923 Jan. 12 (1) To the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Department’s views on Peru’s refusal to participate in conference, as expressed by Secretary in conversation with Peruvian Ambassador. Instructions to make discreet use of views in conversations with Foreign Minister.
288
Jan. 18 (2) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Willingness of Peruvian President to have Peru attend conference if Chilean Government will take some action satisfactory to Peruvian public.
290
[Page XLIII]Jan. 22 (5) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Chilean President’s regret at refusal of Bolivia, Peru, and Mexico to attend conference and his desire to aid in rapprochement between United States and Mexico.
291
Jan. 27 (6) To the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Chilean Ambassador’s assertion that Peru should have accepted invitation, since agreement had already been reached to submit Tacna-Arica question to arbitration and there was no difficulty between Chile and Peru; his failure to mention Peru’s assertions of outrages against Peruvians in Tacna-Arica.
292
Feb. 17 (6) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Bolivia’s decision not to participate in conference because of Chile’s unwillingness to accept revision of treaty of 1904.
292
Feb. 19 (3) To the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Instructions to send information concerning Uruguayan President’s plan for association of American nations.
293
Feb. 23 (8) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Summary of Uruguayan President’s plan for association of American nations.
293
Mar. 1 (16) From the Chargé in Mexico (tel.)
Brazilian Ambassador’s efforts to persuade Mexico to reconsider refusal to attend conference and his intimation that Mexico fears that, in signing treaties or conventions at conference, the U. S. delegates would make reservations embarrassing to Mexican delegates.
295
Mar. 5 (23) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Aide-mémoire sent to Brazilian Ambassador (text printed) expressing hope Mexico would participate in conference, but refusing to give pledge or promise concerning reservations.
295
Mar. 5 (20) To the Chargé in Mexico (tel.)
Transmittal of copy of aide-mémoire sent to Brazilian Ambassador.
296
Mar. 6 (10) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Peruvian President’s statement that Peru would be unable to attend conference.
297
Mar. 8 (30) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Aide-mémoire sent to Chilean Ambassador (text printed) expressing hope that Mexico would participate in conference, but refusing to give pledge or promise concerning reservations.
297

Conventions Between the United States and Other American Republics Signed at the Fifth International Conference of American States

convention for the protection of commercial, industrial, and agricultural trade marks and commercial names

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Apr. 28 Convention between the United States of America and Other American Republics
For protection of commercial, industrial, and agricultural trade marks and commercial names.
297
[Page XLIV]

treaty to avoid or prevent conflicts between the american states

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 3 Treaty between the United States of America and Other American Republics
To avoid or prevent conflicts between the American States.
308

convention providing for the publicity of customs documents

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 3 Convention between the United States of America and Other American Republics
Providing for the publicity of customs documents.
314

convention providing for uniformity of nomenclature for the classification of merchandise

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 3 Convention between the United States of America and Other American Republics
Providing for uniformity of nomenclature for the classification of merchandise.
318

Agreements Between the United States and Central American Republics, Signed at Washington, February 7, 1923

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 12 From the Secretary General of the Conference on Central American Affairs
Signed originals (texts printed), for deposit with U. S. Government, of convention for the establishment of commissions of inquiry, and of protocol of an agreement in connection with convention establishing International Central American Tribunal, signed February 7.
320

Boundary Disputes

colombia and panama

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Mar. 23 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Colombian Chargé
Chargé’s request that United States take steps, as provided in treaty of 1914 between United States and Colombia, for the conclusion of a treaty between Colombia and Panama for the establishment of diplomatic relations and adjustment of pecuniary liabilities.
328
1923 Apr. 12 To the Panaman Minister
Draft procès-verbal (text printed) of meeting between Secretary of State and Ministers of Colombia and Panama as an arrangement for negotiation of treaty and resumption of diplomatic relations, on understanding that boundary between Colombia and Panama is the line fixed by the law of New [Page XLV]Granada of 1855 and as stated in the treaty of 1914 between Colombia and the United States amending the Granada constitution of 1853.
(Similar letter apparently sent to Colombian Minister.)
328
Apr. 18 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State
Panaman Minister’s statement that boundary should be settled by public treaty after institution of relations and not be an informal document such as the proposed procès-verbal.
331
Apr. 30 (1063) From the Colombian Minister
Colombian Government’s approval of text of procès-verbal and authorization for Minister to sign.
334
June 2 To the Panaman Legation
Review of U. S. efforts to settle boundary dispute. Hope that Panama will accept proposed line, which is in accordance with that described in the Panaman Constitution.
334
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Panaman Minister, June 2, 1923
Secretary’s oral statement of substance of memorandum to Panaman Minister and refusal to follow Minister’s suggestion that Colombia be persuaded to resume relations and leave boundary settlement to future negotiations.
337
June 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State
Secretary’s inability to comply with Colombian Minister’s request for a statement regarding situation with Panama.
340
Aug. 6 From the Panaman Minister
Renewal of proposal of May 8 that that portion of boundary line between Aspavé and Pacific Ocean be left to settlement by future diplomatic negotiations either by direct convention or by arbitration.
341
Aug. 25 To the Panaman Minister
Refusal to agree that boundary question requires further examination by either Government concerned or by impartial arbiter.
348
Oct. 29 From the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State
Panaman Minister’s oral statement of his Government’s categorical refusal to accept boundary proposed in draft procès-verbal; and his intimation that if matter is allowed to rest it might be possible to reach agreement at later date.
350

colombia and peru

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Oct. 8 (36) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to suggest to President of Peru that boundary treaty of 1922 with Colombia be submitted to Peruvian Congress simultaneously with its submission to Colombian Congress, in accordance with request of President of Colombia for President Harding’s good offices in carrying out this provision of treaty.
351
[Page XLVI]Nov. 5 (43) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that treaty may be brought up in present Congress and, if so, will probably be ratified.
352
Nov. 7 (39) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain what steps have been taken by Peru to fix date for joint submission of boundary treaty to Congresses of Colombia and Peru; and, if there have been none, to approach President in sense of Department’s telegram no. 36 of October 8.
352
Nov. 16 From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Avowed intention of President of Peru to submit treaty to Congress and insist upon its approval.
353
Dec. 4 (47) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Department’s doubt that more energetic representations to President of Peru would be effective at this time, since the President apparently intends to avoid submitting treaty to Congress because of approaching election.
353

guatemala and honduras

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 29 (6) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Instructions to inform President of Guatemala that Honduras has agreed to submit boundary controversy to President of the United States; and to express hope that like decision will be reached by Guatemala.
354
Jan. 31 (9) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
President’s assurance that Guatemala will join in agreement to submit boundary dispute to President of United States and that Minister at Washington will be instructed accordingly.
354
Sept. 14 (58) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Willingness of President Coolidge to arbitrate boundary dispute in place of late President Harding if formal request should be made by both Governments.
355
Sept. 17 (388) From the Chargé in Guatemala
Desire of Guatemalan Government that no action be taken on boundary dispute until after presidential election in Honduras.
355

dominican republic and haiti

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Apr. 26 (50) From the American Commissioner in the Dominican Republic
Report of his suggestion to Commission of Dominicans that present was opportune time for negotiating immigration agreements with Italy and Spain and for commencing negotiations with Haiti to settle boundary question. Hope that Department will exert its good offices with Haiti.
356
[Page XLVII]May 18 (509) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Suggestion of High Commissioner in Haiti that portion of boundary line surveyed in 1901 in district of Laguna Salidilla be resurveyed by joint commission. Instructions to discuss suggestion with Commissioner in Dominican Republic and report on its advisability.
358
May 29 (858) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Inadvisability of proposing resurvey of portion of line surveyed in 1901 in district of Laguna Salidilla, in view of activities of subcommittee of Commission of Dominicans appointed to make recommendations for immediate negotiations with Haiti for definite settlement of dispute.
358
June 25 (20) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to do everything possible to obtain settlement of dispute during nonpartisan Dominican regime.
(Similar instructions to High Commissioner in Haiti.)
359
June 25 (68) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
For General Russell: Instructions to inform President of Haiti of undesirability of proposing partial resurvey of boundary and opportuneness of time for negotiating a permanent settlement of boundary question.
360
June 29 (90) From the High Commissioner in Haiti (tel.)
Opposition of President of Haiti to any action by the Dominican Provisional Government toward a permanent settlement of boundary question; his claim that the Provisional Government has no authority to take such action.
360
July 7 (75) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
For General Russell: Information that Commission of Dominicans, which elected Provisional Government, voted unanimously on May 11 authorizing Government to negotiate with Haiti for submission of dispute to arbitration. Instructions to make every effort to secure cooperation of President of Haiti.
361
July 14 (100) From the High Commissioner in Haiti (tel.)
President’s intention to accept in principle the question of immediate negotiation for settlement by arbitration, but to request that negotiations be carried on at Port-au-Prince.
361
Sept. 14 (50) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Likelihood that arbiters will soon be named to begin negotiations at Port-au-Prince.
362

honduras and nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 29 (6) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Instructions to advise President of Honduras that Nicaragua has accepted draft protocol (text printed) providing for submission of boundary dispute to arbitral decision of U. S. Secretary of State, as agreed upon by delegations of Honduras and Nicaragua at Central American Conference; and to express hope that Honduras will accept protocol so that announcement of agreement may be made at closing plenary session of conference.
362
[Page XLVIII]Feb. 6 (10) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information of President’s suggestion that United States send note to Foreign Office for submission to Congress; also of instructions sent to Honduran delegate to conference to accept proposed mediation for settlement of boundary dispute with Guatemala.
363
Feb. 10 (7) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Suggestion that Government submit protocol to Congress as coming from its own representatives, nature of proposed mediation making suggested U. S. note inadvisable.
363

The Tacna-Arica Question: Opening of the Arbitration and Exchange of Cases by Chile and Peru

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 16 (16) From the Chilean Ambassador
Application to President of the United States to act as arbitrator in Tacna-Arica controversy, as provided in arbitration agreement of July 20, 1922.
364
Jan. 20 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Application to President of United States to act as arbitrator in Tacna-Arica controversy, as provided in the arbitration agreement of July 20, 1922.
365
Jan. 29 To the Chilean Ambassador
President’s acceptance of office of arbitrator.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Peruvian Ambassador.)
365
Mar. 1 (52) From the Chilean Ambassador
Appointment of representative to take charge of Chile’s interests in arbitration proceedings.
366
Mar. 14 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Personnel of commission to present Peruvian case in arbitration proceedings.
366
Mar. 21 (178) To the Chargé in Peru
Arrangements as to time for preparation and presentation of cases and for examination of each case by the other party, with privilege of certain extensions of time.
(Sent also to Chile.)
367
Sept. 1 (255) From the Chilean Ambassador
Appointment of second Chilean representative.
367
Sept. 18 (20) To the Ambassador in Peru
Postponement of presentation of cases upon request of Chile.
368
Nov. 13 (324) From the Chilean Ambassador
Submission of Chilean case for presentation to President of United States.
368
Nov. 13 From the Peruvian Chargé
Submission of Peruvian case for presentation to President of United States.
369
[Page XLIX]Nov. 13 To the Chilean Ambassador
Transmittal of case of Peru.
(The same note, mutatis mutandis, to Peruvian Chargé.)
370
Dec. 16 From the Peruvian Chargé
Appointment of new president of Counsel of Peru.
370

ALBANIA

American Protests Against a Concession to the Anglo-Persian Oil Company for an Alleged Monopoly in Albania

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 16 (16) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Information that Government feels obligated by agreement signed by former Cabinet to submit to National Assembly the Anglo-Persian Oil Co.’s proposals for oil monopoly; also that Minister is making effort to obtain French and Italian cooperation in maintenance of open door.
371
Feb. 19 (6) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Request for available details on proposed Anglo-Persian concession and on U. S. interests concerned; for information as to possibility of concession’s rejection by National Assembly; and for explanation of reference to French and Italian cooperation for maintenance of open door.
371
Feb. 21 (17) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Detailed information concerning proposals of Anglo-Persian Oil Co., U. S. interests concerned, possibility of concession’s ratification by National Assembly, and Italian and French objections to establishment of a British monopoly.
372
Feb. 27 (9) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Instructions to state that National City Bank has established $40,000 credit in favor of Albania as guaranty for contract being negotiated by Standard Oil Co. of New York.
373
Feb. 27 (10) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Authorization to make representations against violation of open door or discrimination against U. S. companies. Information of Italian Ambassador’s suggestion that United States, France, and Italy act together. Instructions to cooperate but to make representations independently.
373
Mar. 1 (19) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Advice that officials have been notified concerning credit established as guaranty for Standard Oil contract.
374
Mar. 2 (20) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Albanian Government’s favorable reception of U. S. representations.
375
Mar. 2 (16) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information concerning Italian Ambassador’s suggestion of simultaneous representations by France, Italy, and United States, and Department’s reply that U. S. Minister would cooperate with his Italian and French colleagues but would make independent representations.
375
[Page L]Mar. 3 (21) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Report of British propaganda threatening loss of Albanian territory in south and reimposition of capitulations if National Assembly rejects Anglo-Persian concession.
376
Mar. 5 (50) From the Minister in Albania
Independent representations by U. S. Minister, March 2 (text printed) and by Italian and French Chargés, March 3 and 4. U. S. Minister’s efforts to discount British propaganda.
376
Mar. 8 (11) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Authorization to refer to Prime Minister’s assurances of June 25, 1922, that Albania would accord every facility to U. S. capital in Albania and would grant concessions to U. S. firms.
379
Mar. 14 (827) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Information concerning negotiations for concessions in Albania; instructions to report any relevant information.
(Sent also to the Ambassadors in France and Italy.)
380
Mar. 19 (27) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
French Chargé’s aide-mémoire to Albanian Minister for Foreign Affairs, in sense of U. S. representations of March 2.
381
Mar. 30 (60) From the Minister in Albania
Italian Minister’s pro memoria sent to Albanian Minister for Foreign Affairs, in support of representations made by Italian Chargé on March 30.
381
Apr. 11 (33) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Information that Anglo-Persian Oil Co. has again submitted modified proposals. French Chargé’s desire for joint note protesting against admission of modifications and demanding simultaneous consideration by National Assembly of all proposals. Request for instructions.
382
Apr. 12 (17) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Message of National City Bank for Albanian Government (text printed) guaranteeing financial competence of Standard Oil representative.
382
Apr. 18 (35) From the Minister of Albania (tel.)
Reference of British modified proposals to committee of National Assembly. U. S. Minister’s inclination to favor French plan for joint representations.
383
Apr. 18 (18) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Disapproval of plan for joint representations suggested by French Chargé.
383
Apr. 20 (37) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Terms of modified British proposals; British demand for Parliamentary action before conclusion of boundary question; arrival of British adviser to Albanian Prime Minister.
384
May 4 (38) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Prime Minister’s desire to placate great European powers in matter of oil concessions. Request for instructions as to conduct should Albania disregard its pledges to United States.
384
[Page LI]May 19 (33) To the Minister in Albania
Acknowledgment of receipt of copies of French and Italian representations to Albania. Inquiry whether they may be referred to in Department’s correspondence with France and Italy as indicating policy of French and Italian Governments.
385
May 23 (20) To the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Instructions to call attention to Prime Minister’s assurances of June 25, 1922, that Albania would accord every facility to U. S. capital in Albania and grant concessions to U. S. firms. Inquiry whether there is a pronounced tendency to discriminate against Americans.
385
May 26 (40) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Information concerning use made of Prime Minister’s assurances of June 25, 1922; rejection of Anglo-Persian proposals by joint committee of National Assembly, and British attitude; reasons for present political advantage of British.
386
June 8 (2487) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Interview with Standard Oil officials; their request that information not be forwarded, vice president promising to give Department full particulars on arrival in United States.
387
June 13 (110) From the Minister in Albania
Presumption of secret agreement between Albanian and British Governments because of Albania’s continued contention that Anglo-Persian Oil Co. has preferential rights. Summary of modifications achieved by efforts of United States and other powers.
387
June 13 (112) From the Minister in Albania
Implied admission by Secretary General of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of an understanding with the British.
388
July 2 (126) From the Chargé in Albania
Financial Adviser’s memorandum setting forth plan for equal opportunity for all companies submitting contracts.
389
July 9 (927) To the Chargé in Great Britain
Instructions to report substance of interview with Standard Oil officials, vice president having failed to communicate promised information to Department.
390
Aug. 3 (2717) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Substance of interviews with Standard Oil officials regarding status of oil negotiations.
390
Aug. 3 (47) From the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Meeting of National Assembly in extraordinary session, August 20, to discuss oil concessions.
391
Aug. 7 (27) To the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Inquiry whether Albanian Government contemplates using Financial Adviser’s plan as basis in considering oil concession. Instructions to repeat representations at appropriate time.
391
[Page LII]Aug. 27 (48) From the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Information concerning influence of Financial Adviser; and attempt by those in control of Government party to make oil concessions a party issue, so as to force adoption of Anglo-Persian contract later on.
391
Sept. 25 (54) From the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Government’s sudden decision, September 24, to bring question of oil concessions before National Assembly, apparently under pressure from British Minister; and rumored willingness to make concessions to Opposition regarding election law in order to secure action on Anglo-Persian contract.
392
Sept. 26 [27?] (56) From the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s declaration in secret meeting of National Assembly, September 26, that oil concession had no political significance. Discontinuation of discussions on oil concession for present session, because of strength of Opposition.
393
Sept. 27 (32) To the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether there is any basis for rumors of British pressure and, if so, whether efforts have been made to verify the authority for the reports.
394
Sept. 27 (266) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to bring reports of undue political pressure in Albania to attention of British Foreign Office and to refer to U. S. interest in maintaining open door.
(Instructions to repeat to Legation in Albania.)
394
Oct. 5 (423) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Denial by Foreign Office of truth of reports of British pressure to force Anglo-Persian contract upon Albanian Government. Note from Foreign Office (substance printed) denying that British company is seeking a monopoly in Albania or that there is any threat to territorial integrity of Albania.
395
Dec. 22 (192) From the Minister in Albania
Information that Foreign Minister’s declaration in Assembly that oil question was not political and the sudden discontinuance of discussions were attributable apparently to French guaranty of southern boundary, coupled with Italian support.
396

AUSTRIA

Negotiations for a Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Consular Rights Between the United States and Austria

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 19 (13) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether the immediate negotiation of a general treaty of amity, commerce, and consular rights would be agreeable to Austrian Government.
398
July 23 (30) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Report that Austria is prepared to negotiate treaty of amity, commerce, and consular rights with the United States.
398
[Page LIII]Aug. 3 (579) To the Minister in Austria
Draft treaty for submission to Austrian Government (text printed).
399
Dec. 18 (374) From the Minister in Austria
Report of conferences and negotiations, with proposed amended articles (texts printed).
413

BELGIUM

Convention and Protocol Between the United States and Belgium Relating to American Rights in East Africa, Signed on April 18, 1923, and January 21, 1924, Respectively

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 2 (15) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Memorandum for Foreign Minister (text printed) accepting article 8 of Mandate for Ruanda-Urundi as defined by the Council of the League of Nations and expressing willingness to proceed to signature of convention. Instructions to express orally U. S. assumption that American missionaries will not be deprived of privileges in territory.
431
Feb. 3 (23) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s willingness to sign treaty at U. S. convenience; and assurances of intention to continue privileges of missionaries.
432
Dec. 10 (83) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Note for Foreign Minister (text printed) transmitting a draft protocol amending the convention signed April 18, in order to provide for U. S. assent to certain modifications in Ruanda-Urundi boundary agreed upon by Belgium and Great Britain.
432
Apr. 18, 1923, and Jan. 21, 1924 Convention and Protocol between the United States of America and Belgium
Defining American rights in East Africa.
433

BOLIVIA

Reluctance of Bolivia To Fulfill the Contract of 1922 for a Loan From American Bankers

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 26 (4) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Equitable Trust Co.’s alarm over advices that legality of loan is to be attacked as matter of politics. Authorization to point out danger of losses to U. S. bondholders and probable effect on Bolivia’s credit, should such an attack be made.
441
Apr. 3 (18) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
President’s claim that loan contract was made with the purpose and belief that New York bankers would lend an additional two millions for completion of Potosi-Sucre Railway; and his failure to grant power of attorney for signature of definitive bonds because of the alleged illegality of certain clauses of loan contract.
441
[Page LIV]Apr. 3 (6) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to bring to President’s attention the views of New York bankers that failure to issue definitive bonds prior to date of next interest payment may bring about depression in market value of bonds and may seriously affect Bolivia’s general credit.
442
Apr. 6 (20) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Presentation of bankers’ views; President’s gratification at receiving them.
443
Apr. 9 (7) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to recommend to President the immediate fulfillment of contract, informing him that the Department understands contract was signed with Bolivian Government’s full knowledge of contents and is undoubtedly legal.
443
Apr. 10 (21) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
President’s appointment of commission to arrange for modifications in loan contract.
444
Apr. 18 (23) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Memorandum of the Bolivian Government, April 17 (text printed) stating that loan contract was signed under pressure without Government’s full knowledge of details, that it was the same as a draft of March 17, 1922, previously rejected, and that it violated Bolivian law authorizing loan; and requesting the Department to obtain the consent of the Equitable Trust Co. to modification of the contract.
445
Apr. 25 (8) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Bankers’ statement for transmission to President (text printed) asserting that contract was not the rejected contract of March 17, 1922, that Bolivian Government knew of its contents, and that experts agreed it was legal; and explaining the impracticability of modification and urgent necessity for fulfillment of contract. Bankers’ proposed explanation for bondholders (text printed). Instructions to renew representations.
447
May 2 (26) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Probability that provisional power of attorney will be granted.
450
May 16 To the Bolivian Minister
Communication of text of power of attorney for Bolivian consul at New Orleans.
450
Dec. 19 (25) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Authorization to convey Equitable Trust Co.’s protest, followed by formal note if necessary, against bill passed in Senate declaring Potosi-Sucre Railroad and certain other revenues free from lien of loan contract.
451
Dec. 21 (48) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
President’s justification of release of lien and explanation of loan service provided for in new revenue law. Request for instructions whether to present formal note.
451
[Page LV]Dec. 28 (27) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to present formal note conveying Equitable Trust Co.’s views and protests.
452
1924 Jan. 3 (1) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Passage of law and its signature by the President, notwithstanding Minister’s formal protest.
452

BRAZIL

Exchange of Notes Between the United States and Brazil According Mutual Unconditional Most-Favored-Nation Tariff Treatment

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Jan. 6 (3) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Report on Executive decree issued January 4 continuing for 1922 the U. S. tariff preferentials as granted in 1921; also decree granting customs preferentials to same articles of Belgian origin.
453
Dec. 16 (172) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions not to request renewal of preferences for 1923, pending further instructions.
453
Dec. 26 (136) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Suggestion that, pending conclusion of new commercial arrangements, customary decree granting preferentials be requested, thus securing preferential treatment for articles usually listed.
453
1923 Jan. 6 (2) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to inform Government that United States, now committed to principle of unconditional most-favored-nation treatment, requests, instead of renewal of preferences, a formal announcement that Brazil will accord United States such treatment; and that United States contemplates proposing new commercial treaty. View that request for renewal of preferences is inconsistent with new U. S. policy.
454
Jan. 15 (4) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Government’s readiness to discuss new customs regulations, representative having been appointed for purpose; desire for arrangement based on mutual concessions, however, rather than commercial treaty proposed.
455
Apr. 24 (37) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Inquiry whether Brazil appears likely to make formal statement requested; whether it accords Argentina or other countries preferential customs not accorded United States; and whether demand for refund of duties paid in excess of former preferential rates is likely.
455
Apr. 26 (30) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Brazil’s disinclination to make formal statement as requested; regrant of preferential treatment to Argentina only. Ambassador’s opinion that no demands will be made for refund of duty.
456
[Page LVI]May 23 From the Brazilian Embassy
Readiness to accept U. S. policy of reciprocal most-favored-nation treatment; inquiry as to best means of effecting an understanding; citation of certain disadvantages which may develop by interruption of customary preferential treatment of U. S. products.
456
June 2 To the Brazilian Embassy
Submission of notes which countries might exchange. Inability of United States under new policy to request customs preferences in return for favors of any kind.
459
Oct. 18 To the Brazilian Ambassador
Understanding that, in respect of customs and other duties and changes affecting importation of products and manufactures of United States into Brazil and of Brazil into United States, each country will accord to the other unconditional most-favored-nation treatment, with certain exceptions as to Cuba and the commerce between the United States and its dependencies and Panama Canal Zone.
461
Oct. 18 From the Brazilian Ambassador
Confirmation of U. S. understanding.
462

BULGARIA

Naturalization Treaty Between the United States and Bulgaria, Signed November 23, 1923

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Nov. 23 (389) From the Minister in Bulgaria
Transmittal of naturalization treaty.
464
Nov. 23 Treaty between the United States of America and Bulgaria
Concerning status of former nationals of either country who have acquired, or who may acquire, nationality in the other country by process of naturalization.
464

CANADA

Signing of a Convention Between the United States and Great Britain for the Preservation of the Halibut Fishery in the Northern Pacific

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 12 (118) From the British Ambassador
Inquiry whether the United States concurs in certain suggested modifications in draft convention.
467
Feb. 27 To the British Ambassador
Concurrence in suggested modifications and preparation of convention for signature.
468
Mar. 2 Convention between the United States of America and Great Britain.
For the preservation of the halibut fishery in the northern Pacific.
468
[Page LVII]Mar. 5 To the British Ambassador
Senate resolution, March 4 (text printed) giving advice and consent to ratification of convention, subject to understanding that it applied to the whole of Great Britain. Hope that Great Britain will accept Senate reservation.
471
Mar. 28 (240) From the British Ambassador
Inquiry whether framers of Senate resolution meant term “Great Britain” to be synonymous with “British Empire.”
471
Apr. 4 To the British Ambassador
Information that intention of framers of resolution was undoubtedly to cover any part of the British Empire.
472
June 16 To President Harding
Canada’s refusal to ratify convention with Senate reservation because it would place Canada in embarrassing position of having to secure consent of British Empire to the convention which Canada had negotiated and signed without usual approach to British Foreign Office. Suggestion that either the treaty be resubmitted to Senate omitting reservation, or that the two Governments enact protective legislation.
472
June 18 To President Harding
Canada’s willingness to ratify convention as signed, on reasonable assurance that convention would be introduced in forthcoming session of Congress and approved without reservation.
474
June 20 From President Harding
Promise to ask for Senate’s ratification of original treaty and, in case of failure, to recommend protective legislation.
475
Sept. 6 (764) From the British Chargé
Inquiry whether United States would agree to simultaneous public announcement that close season will not be effective during 1923–24, since convention cannot be put into effect.
476
Sept. 28 (822) From the British Chargé
Canada’s suggestion that the two Governments take simultaneous action prohibiting the landing in their ports of halibut taken in Pacific during 3 months beginning November 16, or that they send simultaneous announcements October 1 to Pacific halibut fishing industry that close season will not be effective during 1923–24.
476
Oct. 4 To the British Chargé
Information that the President has expressed his willingness to resubmit to the Senate the convention as signed; that the Executive is without authority to make or enforce regulations suggested by Canada; that the United States is prepared to join Canada in public announcement that close season will not be effective during 1923–24.
478
Oct. 9 (872) From the British Chargé
Draft statement (text printed) announcing that, as result of correspondence exchanged between Canada and United States and to avoid continued uncertainty, there will be no close season for halibut during winter of 1923–24.
479
Oct. 12 To the British Chargé
Modified draft statement (text printed) omitting reference to correspondence exchanged in regard to close season.
479
[Page LVIII]Dec. 17 To the Consul General at Ottawa (tel.)
Personal message for Canadian Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries (text printed) inquiring whether section 9 of Canadian act for protection of halibut exempts British vessels from seizure and forfeiture.
480
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 31] From the Consul General at Ottawa
Letter from Canadian Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries (text printed) quoting opinion of Department of Justice that section 9 does not exempt British vessels from forfeiture but excludes them from two causes applicable to foreigners.
481

Termination of the Canadian Practice of Granting Port Privileges to United States Fishing Vessels

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Nov. 21 (995) From the British Chargé
Canada’s decision to terminate port privileges granted to U. S. fishing vessels, since United States has not granted reciprocal privileges.
482
Nov. 28 To the British Chargé
Acknowledgment of Canada’s decision to terminate port privileges and information that proper public announcement will be made.
484

Negotiations for a New Treaty Between the United States and Canada To Limit Naval Armament on the Great Lakes

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Prime Minister of Canada and the Canadian Minister of Defense, July 12, 1922
Prime Minister’s suggestion that, in view of apprehension of Canadian people as to increase in American naval forces on Great Lakes, the Rush-Bagot Agreement of 1817 be remodeled to fit modern conditions. Secretary’s explanation that use of such forces against Canada had occurred to no one; willingness to enter into negotiations upon receipt of more definite proposals from Canadian Government. Premier’s agreement that proposals should be submitted.
484
July 13 (538) From the British Chargé
Advisability of delaying reply to U. S. inquiry concerning entry of U. S. S. Wilmington into Great Lakes, as Canadian Prime Minister and Minister of National Defense are visiting Washington to discuss general question of naval vessels on Great Lakes.
486
July 24 To the British Chargé
Understanding that concrete proposals for an agreement will be submitted by the Canadian Government.
487
Nov. 28 (887) From the British Ambassador
Submission of draft treaty (text printed) to supersede the Rush-Bagot Agreement.
487
[Page LIX]1923 Jan. 18 From the British Embassy
Canadian Government’s desire that United States proceed to signature of treaty before Canadian Parliament convenes, January 31.
489
May 12 To the British Ambassador
Submission of new draft treaty (text printed) and statement explaining modifications.
490

Canadian Legislation Authorizing the Prohibition of the Exportation of Pulpwood

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 5 To the British Chargé
Serious importance to United States of resolution adopted June 26 by Canadian Parliament authorizing Governor in Council to prohibit exportation of pulpwood from Canada. Request for full information, especially with respect to any action contemplated by Canadian Government.
494
July 6 To the President of the American Paper and Pulp Association of New York
Canadian resolution of June 26 (text printed). Assurance of Department’s interest in matter.
495
July 7 To the Consul General at Ottawa (tel.)
Information of serious effect prohibition of export of pulpwood would have upon U. S. newspaper industry; Department’s suggestion that U. S. interests concerned proceed to Ottawa and emphasize seriousness of situation; possibility of U. S. retaliation. Instructions to make informal representations.
495
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the British Chargé, July 16, 1923
Chargé’s presentation of a note concerning Canada’s appointment of a commission of inquiry. Secretary’s intimation of U. S. retaliation.
496
July 16 (591) From the British Chargé
Information that there is no likelihood of any action being taken by Canada to give effect to provisions of the law until inquiry to be undertaken by a Royal Commission has been completed.
498

Establishment of a Joint Board of Control To Supervise the Diversion of Waters From the Niagara River

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 3 To the British Ambassador
Suggestions for the creation of a Niagara Control Board for the purpose of measuring and supervising the diversion of waters from the Niagara River.
498
July 25 (615) From the British Chargé
Canada’s agreement to creation of Niagara Control Board and appointment of representative to serve on board.
500
[Page LX]Aug. 21 To the British Chargé
Appointment of U. S. representative to serve on board. Request that Canadian Government be informed.
501

CHINA

Collapse of the Government of Li Yuan-hung and the Election of Tsao Kun to the Presidency of China

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 5 (8) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Appointment of Chang Shao-tseng as Premier; list of other Cabinet appointments.
503
Jan. 25 (31) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Senate’s confirmation of all Cabinet appointments except that of Sze as Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs.
(Footnote: Huang Fu replaced Sze on February 9.)
503
Mar. 9 (76) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Cabinet discussion of recent student activities, financial situation, and militarists’ ultimatum; Cabinet’s resignation.
(Footnote: President’s refusal to accept resignations.)
504
Apr. 9 (98) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Resignation of Huang Fu as Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs and the appointment of Wellington Koo.
505
Apr. 10 (102) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Rumors of impending hostilities between Fengtien forces of Chang Tso-lin and Chihli forces of Tsao Kun, Wu Pei-fu, and Feng Yu-hsiang.
506
Apr. 27 (123) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Warlike preparations by both Fengtien and Chihli forces; President’s assertion that he is doing utmost to avert hostilities.
506
May 4 (130) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conference between U. S., British, French, and Japanese representatives at Peking and Chinese Premier: Representatives’ threat to withdraw recommendations to their Governments regarding Consortium loan if fighting occurs in North China and their suggestion that forces be withdrawn and neutral zone established; Premier’s assurances that crisis is past.
506
June 7 (201) From the Minister in China (tel.).
Resignation of Cabinet as result of attack instigated as first move in plan to force Li Yuan-hung out of Presidency and put Tsao Kun in his place; Premier’s departure for Tientsin.
507
June 7 (203) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conjecture that Chihli Party plans to install Yen as new Premier and Wellington Koo as Minister of Foreign Affairs and subsequently secure Tsao Kun’s election to Presidency.
508
June 9 (208) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Police strike, presumably instigated to force President Li Yuan-hung to abandon office and thus prepare way for Tsao Kun.
508
[Page LXI]June 9 (210) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Assumption of responsibility for maintenance of order and protection of foreign interests by Army and police officials. Belief, despite official assurance, that chief motive of police strike is political and that President will resign.
509
June 9 (211) From the Minister in China (tel.)
End of police strike; reasons obscure.
510
June 13 (220) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Departure of President for Tientsin.
510
June 14 (221) From the Minister in China (tel.)
President’s resignation and surrender of seals. Difficulty of electing new President in divided Parliament.
510
June 29 From the Secretary for Foreign Affairs of the Canton Government to the Consul at Canton
Manifesto issued by Dr. Sun Yat-sen, June 29 (text printed) connecting the Peking Militarists with the Lincheng outrage and demanding that foreign powers withhold recognition from Peking until truly representative government is established.
511
July 13 (257) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Deterioration and impotence of Peking Government evidenced by resignations in Cabinet and inaction of Parliament; British newspapers’ support of Sun Yat-sen’s demand that foreign powers withdraw recognition; difficulties which such an act might engender.
513
July 23 (262) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Wellington Koo’s assumption of office of Minister of Foreign Affairs.
515
Aug. 17 (1738) From the Minister in China
Joint note from U. S., French, British, and Japanese Ministers to Chinese Foreign Minister, August 11 (text printed) deploring possible outbreak of hostilities between authorities of Kiangsu and Chekiang Provinces, calling attention to Chinese Government’s obligation to protect foreign interests in region of Shanghai, and holding Government accountable for all possible injuries to foreigners.
515
Sept. 12 (1818) From the Minister in China
Temporary appointments by Cabinet mandates to fill existing Cabinet vacancies, with exception of post of Premier.
516
Oct. 5 (332) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Election of Tsao Kun as President.
517
Oct. 10 (216) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry when Tsao Kun will formally assume office and whether diplomatic corps intends to recognize him as President.
517
Oct. 10 (337) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inauguration of Tsao Kun as President; his address (excerpt printed) assuring foreign interests the protection demanded by diplomatic corps.
518
[Page LXII]Oct. 11 (341) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Refusal of diplomatic corps to take part in official or social courtesies until Government gives assurances of compliance with demands in Lincheng notes.
518
Oct. 12 (342) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry for authorization to attend diplomatic reception and extend congratulations, if official assurances regarding Lincheng affair have been given.
519
Oct. 12 (345) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Sun Yat-sen’s telegram to dean of diplomatic corps (excerpt printed) opposing recognition of Tsao Kun. Sun’s almost desperate position. Power of Chihli Party, which supports Tsao Kun.
519
Oct. 12 (220) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to extent to which diplomatic corps has committed itself as regards recognition of Tsao Kun; whether country at large will recognize him and whether he gives promise of ability; also as to attitude of other powers.
520
Oct. 14 (346) From the Minister in China (tel.)
General feeling that Chihli Party under Tsao should be given chance; Tsao’s efforts to suppress banditry and protect foreigners; acceptance by diplomatic corps of assurances with respect to demands of Lincheng note; intention of all Ministers to attend diplomatic reception.
520
Oct. 15 (348) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Account of President’s reception to diplomatic corps.
522
Nov. 10 (365) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Summary of political situation: President’s policy of conciliating leaders of rival factions; popular demand that civil strife cease; nomination by President of compromise candidate as Premier; stagnation in business of Government; no relief in financial situation.
523

Unsuccessful Negotiations for a Consortium Loan to China for the Purpose of Consolidating the Chinese Floating Debt

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 4 (5) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Joint note, December 23, 1922, addressed to the Chinese Foreign Minister by the U. S., British, French, and Japanese Ministers making representations against continued application of customs surplus to internal loans to detriment of foreign obligations. Minister’s conference with inspector general of Chinese customs.
525
Jan. 12 (2) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to confer with British Ambassador in endeavor to find out whether Japan is opposed to any loan to China or merely to a loan giving China funds in addition to amounts used for debt funding, in view of ambiguity of Japanese attitude as indicated in Japanese note of December 28, 1922, to Department and telegram to London December 18, 1922, sent by British Ambassador at Tokyo.
526
[Page LXIII]Jan. 17 (2) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Explanation concerning British Ambassador’s telegram of December 18, 1922, to London and Japanese note of December 28, 1922, to United States. Japan’s willingness to have representatives of Japanese banking group take part with others in continuing discussions with Chinese officials for single purpose of consolidating Chinese floating debt.
527
Jan. 27 (9) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Japan’s willingness to have representatives of Japanese banking groups join others in considering small additional loan to China above the total of consolidated floating debt.
529
Feb. 1 (12) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Continued ambiguity of Japanese attitude. Department’s view, also favored by Great Britain, that Consortium should discuss with Chinese authorities the possibilities of negotiating a loan for consolidation of floating debt and in addition thereto a small administrative loan.
(Instructions to repeat to Peking together with pertinent correspondence.)
529
Feb. 16 (14) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain Japanese position in loan negotiations.
530
Feb. 22 (15) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s explanation that his Government is not prepared to have its group participate in negotiations with Chinese Government for funding loan; that it is willing only that Japanese group should in common with U. S., British, and French groups consider and recommend to their respective Governments such plans as they may agree upon for consolidation of Chinese debts.
530
Mar. 12 (49) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to advise British Foreign Office of Japanese attitude; opinion that most feasible course of action is to have Consortium bankers proceed to consider and recommend a concrete proposal for consolidation, as suggested by Japanese Foreign Office.
531
Apr. 10 (276) From the British Ambassador
Inquiry whether United States concurs in proposals of British, French, and Japanese Governments that the four Consortium groups proceed immediately to examination of question of debt consolidation.
532
Apr. 13 (61) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note sent British Ambassador (text printed) informing him that United States concurs in suggested plan and that American group is being advised.
(Instructions to repeat to Tokyo.)
533
Apr. 13 To the American Group
Résumé of loan situation. Desirability of completing consolidation plan before meeting of Special Conference on Chinese Tariff.
534
[Page LXIV]Apr. 21 (116) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on conference, April 17, between group representatives and Chinese Minister of Finance in which Minister explained China’s urgent need for administrative loan.
537
Apr. 27 From the American Group
Opinion that first lien on customs surtax should be created for bonds issued in exchange for foreign debts; hope that idea of an advance to Chinese Government will not be encouraged in authoritative quarters.
538
Apr. 28 (127) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information concerning telegram sent to London for four groups containing recommendations of group representatives. Identic telegram (text printed) conveying agreement of U. S., British, and French Ministers to endorse recommendations of group representatives and intention of Japanese Chargé to refer matter to his Government.
539
Apr. 30 From the American Group
Cablegram from British group (text printed) quoting message from group representatives at Peking for four groups, disclosing China’s willingness to entrust to Consortium issue of consolidated bonds when plans have been approved by Chinese Government, contingent upon certain monthly advances for current expenses; and requesting authorization to proceed on lines indicated.
540
May 11 From the American Group
Cablegram from Messrs. Morgan, Grenfell & Co., London (text printed) quoting message of four groups to their representatives in Peking, May 10, rejecting recommendations for cash advances to China; also quoting message for four groups from their representatives at Peking, May 9, stating that negotiations cannot be pursued on lines contemplated, in view of outrage on Tientsin-Pukow Railway.
541
June 20 From the American Group
Consortium Council Report adopted May 28 at Paris outlining policy (text printed).
543
Sept. 18 (316) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Identic telegram from British, French, and Japanese Ministers to their Governments (text printed) interpreting proposals to salt banks as attempt of Chinese Government to secure disguised administrative loan; and recommending consolidation and administrative loans only if more stable government emerges from Presidential crisis.
547
Sept. 21 (319) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that no government will be set up in Peking in near future strong enough to warrant administrative loans. Appointment by Peking Government of a financial adjustment commission with Yen as president and Yen’s offer to appoint Consortium representatives as advisers.
548
Sept. 29 (326) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Recommendation that Consortium representatives accept Yen’s invitation to them individually and personally to become advisers on financial adjustment commission.
549
[Page LXV]Oct. 8 (214) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Department perceives no objection to acceptance by American Group representative of advisership to financial adjustment commission and that American group has been so advised.
549
Oct. 9 From the American Group
Information that Consortium groups have already expressed approval of Peking representatives’ service on financial adjustment commission in their individual capacities.
549
Oct. 15 (350) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Joint note, October 12, of U. S., British, French, and Japanese Ministers to Chinese Foreign Office protesting against recent mandate preempting for service of internal loans whole customs surplus.
550

Naval Demonstration at Canton by the United States and Other Powers To Avert Seizure of the Customs by the Local Authorities

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 16 (20) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul at Canton, January 16 (text printed) reporting the occupation of Samshui by Yunnan-Kwangsi Army; departure of Chen Chiung-ming presumably for Hongkong; readiness of local troops to change sides.
551
Jan. 18 (22) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Canton, January 17 (text printed) reporting withdrawal of part of Kwantung forces to Waichow, January 15; arrival of Yunnan-Kwangsi forces on the 16th and 17th.
551
Jan. 19 (24) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Canton, January 18 (text printed) reporting Chen’s departure for Waichow, not Hongkong; confused situation at Canton, there being no recognized leader.
551
Jan. 26 (32) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul at Canton reporting inauguration of Hu Han-min, sympathizer of Sun Yat-sen, as Civil Governor.
551
Feb. 15 (58) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Shanghai, February 15 (text printed) reporting departure of Sun Yat-sen and staff for Hongkong.
552
Feb. 22 (64) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Canton, February 21 (text printed) reporting arrival of Sun Yat-sen at Canton.
552
Sept. 22 (321) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note dated September 5 from Canton Government to diplomatic corps at Peking (excerpts printed) presenting claim of Southwestern provinces to share in customs surplus after foreign obligations charged on customs revenues have been paid. Possibility that Canton Government may issue threat of making Canton a free port if their claim is denied.
552
[Page LXVI]Oct. 20 (226) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that Department maintains its previous position that diplomatic body deals with customs surpluses only as trustees for recognized government of China; that United States would regard proposed suppression of customhouses and levying of taxes in lieu of import and export duties as subversive of treaty basis of foreign trade with China.
556
Nov. 14 (367) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of capture of Sheklung by Chen Chiung-ming, November 12, and retreat of Sun’s forces into Canton; presence of U. S. S. Asheville at Canton; arrangement for protection of Americans.
556
Nov. 16 (369) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communications dated November 15 from consul general at Canton and commander of South China Patrol (texts printed) reporting imminence of serious fighting just outside Canton.
556
Nov. 27 (376) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton (text printed) reporting Sun Yat-sen as seriously considering attempt to seize maritime customs at Canton. Information that Chen’s advance seems halted.
557
Nov. 30 (240) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to action contemplated by interested foreign powers in case customs are seized.
557
Dec. 1 (379) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Diplomatic corps’ intention to inform Sun Yat-sen that it cannot advise Chinese Government as to disposition of customs surplus. Dean’s telegram to senior consul at Canton (text printed) requesting that Sun be warned against seizing maritime customs. Opinion of U. S., British, French, Italian, and Japanese Ministers that there should be a concentration of available naval units at Canton to deter Canton Government from its threatened course of action.
557
Dec. 4 (381) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 3 (text printed) reporting that Sun has not yet made final decision and requesting instructions as to position should British and French blockade port if Sun attempts seizure of customs. Minister’s reply, December 4 (text printed) explaining plan for naval demonstration at Canton. Request for instructions.
559
Dec. 5 (384) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 4 (text printed) reporting possibility that Sun may postpone final decision; understanding that British and French contemplate blockade only if other measures fail. Recommendation that United States participate in naval demonstration.
561
Dec. 5 To President Coolidge
Request for President’s views before seeking cooperation of Navy Department in naval demonstration at Canton.
561
[Page LXVII]Dec. 5 From President Coolidge
Approval of plan and authorization to seek Navy Department’s cooperation.
562
Dec. 5 (243) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of measures adopted to prevent seizure of customs. Arrangements for participation of U. S. naval units in naval demonstration at Canton.
562
Dec. 6 (385) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from commander of South China Patrol, December 5 (text printed) reporting British consul general’s receipt of Canton Government’s reply to December 1 note of diplomatic corps.
563
Dec. 6 (244) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that commander in chief of U. S. Asiatic Fleet and commander of South China Patrol have been instructed to concentrate available ships at Canton for naval demonstration and to cooperate with other powers in taking necessary measures short of actual warfare.
563
Dec. 6 (386) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Department’s telegram no. 243, December 5, was repeated to Canton with additional instructions as to contemplated course of action.
564
Dec. 8 (389) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Canton Government’s reply to note of diplomatic corps (text printed) asserting intention to order Commissioner of Customs to cease remittances to Peking Government and retain funds for local uses, but deferring definite action for 2 weeks to await decision of diplomatic corps.
564
Dec. 9 (391) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 8 (text printed) expressing opinion that Sun will carry out threat to seize customs in spite of 2 weeks’ postponement. Discussions of possibility of foreign powers’ taking customhouse before Sun does; also restiveness of Peking Government over action of foreign powers at Canton.
565
Dec. 10 (393) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Office memorandum, December 8 (text printed) inquiring as to reports concerning assembly of war vessels and armed marines of Great Britian, France, Italy, Japan, and United States at Canton and the purpose thereof. Information that other foreign ministers mentioned have received similar communications.
567
Dec. 11 (396) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note from dean of diplomatic corps to Foreign Office (text printed) explaining that no troops have been landed at Canton but that war vessels have been assembled there to prevent seizure of customs.
567
[Page LXVIII]Dec. 11 (397) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from diplomatic corps to senior consul at Canton (text printed) requesting him to inform Canton authorities that the granting or refusal of claim for share in customs surplus does not lie within province of diplomatic corps. Information that time of presentation of this reply to Canton Government is left to discretion of senior consul.
568
Dec. 12 (1061) From the British Chargé
Information that first results of joint naval demonstration seem to have been satisfactory. Hope that, if further action is necessary, the United States will cooperate with all means at disposal.
569
Dec. 13 To President Coolidge
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 10 (text printed) reporting plan of consular body to land marines and occupy customhouse, transferring archives and funds to French concession, if Sun attempts forcible seizure. Plan’s endorsement by Minister to China and by Secretary. Request for President’s approval.
569
Dec. 14 From President Coolidge
Approval of plan of consular body at Canton.
570
Dec. 14 (399) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that diplomatic corps’ reply would be delivered to Sun immediately. Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 13 (text printed) reporting conditions quiet but tense; consular body’s opinion Sun will not act before Monday.
571
Dec. 15 (402) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from commander of South China Patrol, December 14 (text printed) reporting agreement by conference of naval officers that United States, England, France, Portugal, and Japan be represented in landing force, if used; and the starting of antiforeign propaganda.
571
Dec. 15 (250) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of plan of consular body to prevent seizure of customhouse.
572
Dec. 15 (403) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 14 (excerpt printed) reporting decision of consular body to transmit diplomatic body’s reply to Canton Government; and to address warning to commander of Chinese forces that should Sun attempt to seize customs, powers would place marines in customhouse.
572
Dec. 16 (405) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 15 (text printed) reporting that on the 19th Sun will order Commissioner of Customs to retain customs but promises not to use force for present; possibility of further negotiations; continuation of antiforeign propaganda. Arrival of additional naval units.
572
[Page LXIX]Dec. 18 To the British Chargé
Information as to measures the United States has taken to cooperate with other powers for preventing seizure of Canton customhouse.
573
Dec. 18 (410) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 17 (text printed) reporting landing of British and French marines in Shameen; continued antiforeign agitation; expectation that Sun will issue customs order on the 19th as planned.
573
Dec. 18 (411) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 17 (text printed) reporting concentration of propaganda attacks upon United States.
574
Dec. 19 (412) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Messages from consul at Canton, December 18, and commander of South China Patrol (texts printed) stating that if propaganda attacks endanger American lives or property, local authorities will be warned of responsibility.
574
Dec. 21 (416) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul general at Canton, December 20 (text printed) reporting understanding that Sun’s order to Commissioner of Customs has been delivered; urging, as a face-saving measure for Sun, that pressure be brought on Peking Government to allocate customs surplus proportionally among provinces. Necessity of adopting plan for future action.
575
Dec. 22 (417) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Messages from senior consul at Canton to dean of diplomatic corps, from U. S. consul general at Canton, and from commander of South China Patrol, December 21 (texts printed) reporting delivery of Sun’s order to Commissioner of Customs.
576
Dec. 24 (419) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Message from commander of South China Patrol, December 22 (text printed) reporting departure of certain British, French, and Portuguese naval units and marines; opinion that Sun will not seize customhouse but will establish own customs; need for continued presence of U. S. naval vessels because of anti-American propaganda.
577
Dec. 26 (422) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from senior consul at Canton to dean of diplomatic corps, December 22 (text printed) reporting press statement of Canton Government justifying recent order and threatening to appoint new customs officers if order is not obeyed; opinion of consular corps that naval vessels in port should remain. Suggestion that departure of British consul general and half of British marine contingent from Canton be mentioned to British Ambassador as creating impression that Great Britain is weakening.
577
Dec. 27 (423) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent to consul general at Canton, December 27 (text printed) conveying information that inspector general of customs, in reply to Sun, explained why he cannot comply with Sun’s orders, but let Sun down easily; and commending consul general on conduct of affair.
578
[Page LXX]1924 Jan. 3 (1) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that British Chargé has been approached regarding matter of departure from Canton of half of British marine contingent.
579

Attitude of the American Government With Respect to Certain Chinese Internal Taxes

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 4 From the Vice President of the Standard Oil Company of New York
Information concerning recent activities of Chinese provincial authorities with respect to internal taxes, especially as to their apparent desire to obtain possession of inland transit revenues normally accruing to customs authorities from issuance of transit passes for foreign goods. Problems confronting company and its reluctance to take action.
579
May 8 From the Tobacco Merchants Association of the United States
Request that steps be taken to effect abrogation of tax of 20 percent ad valorem levied upon cigars and cigarettes by authorities of Chekiang Province, in contravention of treaties between United States and China.
581
May 22 (405) To the Minister in China
Opinion that dean of diplomatic corps had no proper ground for his protest of April 26, 1922, to the Chinese Foreign Office against imposition of famine relief surcharge stamps upon likin receipts.
582
May 29 To the Vice President of the Standard Oil Company of New York
Information that forthcoming Special Conference on Chinese Tariff will consider abolition of likin and allied problems.
588
May 31 To the Tobacco Merchants Association of the United States
Information concerning representations already made to Chinese Foreign Office against 20 percent ad valorem tax levied upon cigars and cigarettes by Chekiang authorities; possibility of increased interference by provinces in treaty arrangements in regard to taxes.
589
July 13 (1678) From the Minister in China
Suspension of tax on cigars and cigarettes in northern Fukien; and Minister’s efforts to secure similar action in southern Fukien.
590
Sept. 29 (479) To the Minister in China
Instructions to continue to file with Chinese Government protests against imposition of destination taxes, pending consideration of subject before Special Conference on Chinese Tariff.
591
[Page LXXI]

Concurrence by the United States in the Contention by Certain Powers That the Boxer Indemnity Payments Should Be Made in Gold Currency

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 4 (6) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Resumption of deferred Boxer indemnity payments. Refusal of Belgian, French, and Italian Ministers to accept payment by telegraphic transfer at exchange rate, arguing that debt must be paid in gold. Proposal of identic note by representatives of protocol powers supporting contention of Ministers. Request for instructions.
592
Jan. 10 (7) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that Governments concerned have right under protocol of 1901 and exchange of notes of July 2, 1905, to insist upon payment in gold francs, which have the same gold content now as in 1905.
593
Feb. 23 (65) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for authorization to sign note prepared by representatives of protocol powers for Chinese Foreign Office (text printed), expressing unanimous opinion of Governments that indemnity of 1901 should be paid in gold.
593
Feb. 26 (39) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to join colleagues in signing note.
594
Apr. 27 (124) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Recommendation of Belgian and Italian Ministers to their Governments to cause postponement of meeting of Special Conference on Chinese Tariff, if China persists in refusal to make indemnity payments in gold. France’s acquiescence in recommendation.
594
Nov. 5 (1905) From the Minister in China
Note from representatives of protocol powers to Chinese Foreign Minister, November 3 (text printed) quoting their unanswered note of February 24 and demanding immediate settlement of question.
594
Dec. 8 (290) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Identic telegram to respective Governments adopted December 6 by representatives of protocol powers at suggestion of French Minister (text printed), requesting authority to institute an embargo on Chinese customs funds. Minister’s criticism of plan.
596
Dec. 15 (1067) From the British Chargé
Information that British Minister at Peking has been instructed to make it clear that Great Britain cannot agree to embargo plan and to propose that issue be submitted to Hague Tribunal or some other agreed arbitrator.
597
Dec. 24 (256) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note sent to British Embassy, December 24 (text printed) stating that U. S. Minister at Peking has been instructed not to participate in proposed embargo.
598
Dec. 28 (426) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Receipt of note dated December 26 from Foreign Office, refusing to accept contention of protocol powers.
598
[Page LXXII]Dec. 30 (258) To the Minister in China (tel.)
French Embassy’s view that French proposal may have contemplated embargo only on funds necessary to pay France, Belgium, Italy, and Spain in gold. Authorization to join colleagues in such action, pending definite word from French Embassy; instructions to inform French and British Legation.
599
1924 Jan. 1 (1) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that embargo proposal was dropped because of British disapproval; but that a meeting would be held to discuss limited embargo.
599
Jan. 2 (1999) From the Minister in China
Note from Chinese Acting Foreign Minister, December 26 (text printed) refusing to accept contention of protocol powers.
600
Jan. 7 (8) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note from inspector general of Chinese customs to dean of diplomatic corps, January 4, 1924 (excerpt printed) stating that all indemnity installments had been fully paid from customs in 1923, except those refused by Belgium, France, and Italy; but that sufficient silver had been retained in loan service accounts at Shanghai to cover these payments at gold parity.
605

Efforts by the British and American Governments To Secure From Other Powers Acceptance of the Arms Embargo Resolution Which Had Been Proposed at the Washington Conference

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 9 (46) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Adoption by diplomatic body of statement (text printed) which was agreed upon as a substitute for identic telegram of October 3, 1922, because of objections of certain Ministers and which recommends that as many powers as possible approve Washington Conference arms resolution without reservations, but widened to include aircraft other than commercial aircraft. Discussion by diplomatic body of proposal to withhold naval assistance to China.
606
Mar. 2 (71) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry whether proclamation of March 4, 1922, regarding export of arms and munitions of war from United States to China applies to the Philippine Islands.
607
Mar. 14 (209) From the British Ambassador
Information that as a preliminary to British formal adhesion to Washington Conference resolution, the self-governing dominions and India have been consulted. Inquiry whether United States will adopt recommendations of diplomatic corps at Peking. Information that Great Britain is sounding out other governments. Amended draft of Washington Conference resolution (text printed).
607
Mar. 30 (55) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inapplicability of proclamation of March 4, 1922, to the Philippine Islands.
608
[Page LXXIII]Apr. 21 (223) From the Chargé in Norway
Norwegian note, April 19, stating that Minister in Peking may participate in embargo discussion but has no authority to commit Government; and that embargo proposals seem unnecessary for Norway, as an embargo is already in force on arms exportations from Norway to China.
609
July 2 (550) From the British Chargé
Request that U. S. representative at The Hague be instructed to support British colleague in seeking Netherland concurrence in arms embargo resolution; also that similar instructions be sent to U. S. representative at Christiania.
609
July 16 (142) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to present status of adherence of Governments represented at Peking to embargo and whether Minister sees any objection to informing British Government of U. S. willingness to accept terms of embargo.
610
July 31 (268) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Adhesion of Netherland, Norwegian, and Swedish Ministers to recommendations of October 3, 1922. Conviction of Ministers that unanimity as regards embargo could easily be secured if Italy were prevented from enjoying monopoly in selling arms and munitions of war to China. No objection to informing British Government of U. S. adherence.
611
Aug. 25 (721) From the British Chargé
Information that no replies have been received from Norwegian, Netherland, or Swedish Governments. Request that U. S. representatives at capitals of powers participating in 1919 arms embargo agreement be instructed to support representations of British colleagues, except in case of France, Belgium, Italy, and Japan, who have already expressed concurrence.
612
Oct. 5 (422) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office note (text printed) expressing adherence of British Empire to resolution with interpretative note, provided other powers concerned agree to do likewise.
613
Oct. 17 To the British Chargé
Information that U. S. Minister at Peking has been advised of U. S. readiness to assent to terms of embargo provided unanimity of action can be had among other governments, and that recommendations for adoption have been sent to powers which have not yet signified approval.
613
Oct. 17 To the Ambassador in Brazil
Instructions to inform Foreign Office that United States has signified its approval of terms of embargo and hopes Brazilian Government will instruct its representative at Peking in similar sense.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to diplomatic representatives in Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden.)
614
[Page LXXIV]Nov. 22 (145) From the Ambassador in Spain
Foreign Office note, November 20, stating that Minister at Peking has already been instructed of Spanish Government’s approval of amended draft resolution and interpretative note and of its readiness to adhere if there is substantial unanimity among powers.
615
Nov. 23 (2107) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Foreign Minister’s note, November 17, stating that Great Britain has been informed of Brazil’s preference to abstain from embargo agreement, while continuing to follow sympathetically the attitude of the signatories of the Washington Conference.
615
Dec. 6 (92) From the Ambassador in Peru
Foreign Minister’s note, November 26, stating that Peru is entirely in accord with U. S. action and that representative in Peking is being instructed to approve terms of embargo and interpretative note.
616

Amended American Proposal for a Mutual Undertaking Among the Powers To Refrain From Assisting China in Naval Construction

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 24 (15) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to present to diplomatic body an amended formula for withholding naval assistance to China (text printed).
617
July 25 (1689) From the Minister in China
Circular no. 187, July 13, of dean of diplomatic corps (text printed) circulating a letter from Netherland Minister announcing his authorization to concur in U. S. proposal, provided other powers concur. Observation of Japanese Minister, July 16 (text printed) that his Government accepts proposals.
617
Sept. 13 (1809) From the Minister in China
Dean’s circular no. 227, August 30, containing copy of letter from Belgian Minister stating that Belgian Government concurs in proposal, provided other powers concur.
619
Sept. 18 (1827) From the Minister in China
Dean’s circular no. 236, September 14, containing copy of letter from German Minister stating that German Government concurs in proposal.
619

Further Postponement of the Meeting of the Commission on Extraterritoriality in China

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 9 (45) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Tentative program on work of Commission on Extraterritoriality in China; instructions to discuss program with colleagues, particularly the British and Japanese Ministers.
620
May 4 From the Chinese Chargé
Advice that Government would be pleased to have Commission meet at Peking, November 1; request that interested Governments be informed.
620
[Page LXXV]May 11 To the Chinese Minister
Advice that meeting of Commission at Peking, November 1, would be agreeable to United States; also that interested Governments are being informed.
621
May 25 (181) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Minister’s refusal to commit himself, without instructions, to identic telegram (text printed) adopted May 24 by his colleagues recommending to their Governments that meeting of Commission should again be postponed in view of existing conditions in China. Also his opposition and British Minister’s opposition to resolution recommending postponement of Special Conference on Chinese Tariff.
621
May 28 (90) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for opinion whether convening of Commission might be used to focus world attention upon political abuses in China which must be remedied as condition of obtaining relaxation of foreign treaty rights.
622
June 1 (192) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Unanimous opposition of diplomatic body and foreign community to convening of Commission for any purpose. Chinese desire for convening of Commission.
622
June 3 (99) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Japanese Government’s willingness to proceed in accordance with U. S. views. Secretary’s reluctance to postpone Commission indefinitely; suggestion that question be held in abeyance.
623
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Chinese Minister, June 7, 1923
Minister’s representations against delay in holding Conference; Secretary’s reply that subject is receiving consideration but that conditions in China do not justify changes proposed.
624
July 17 (189) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Reply to British inquiry that apart from Danish, Peruvian, Spanish, and Swedish adherence to resolution to establish Commission, no expression of views has been received except from British and Japanese, latter having expressed willingness to take part in Conference.
626
Sept. 13 (312) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Recommendation that Conference be postponed, in view of increasing weakness of Peking Government.
626
Sept. 27 To the Chargé in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform Government as to lack of unanimity among powers toward convening Conference on November 1, 1923, and to request that Government state definitely whether it desires to proceed with Conference or to postpone Conference to November 1, 1924.
(Instructions to repeat to London, Rome, The Hague, Brussels, Lisbon, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Madrid. Sent also to Lima and Tokyo.)
627
[Page LXXVI]Oct. 25 To the Chargé in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform Government that U. S. inquiry disclosed lack of unanimity on convening of Conference on November 1, but that majority of powers assent to postponement to definite date; and to request Government to indicate whether it would agree to postponement to November 1, 1924.
(Instructions to repeat to London, Rome, The Hague, Brussels, Lisbon, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Madrid. Sent also to Lima and to Tokyo with instructions to repeat to China.)
629
Nov. 14 To the Chinese Minister
Information that U. S. inquiry has disclosed lack of unanimity on convening of Conference on November 1, but that majority of powers assent to postponement to definite date, November 1, 1924, having been suggested.
629
Dec. 14 (400) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Office memorandum, December 13, consenting to postponement of Conference to November 1, 1924, and requesting that nature of replies from various Governments be transmitted to Chinese Government.
630
1924 Jan. 14 (15) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to inform Foreign Office that consent of Governments to convening of Commission November 1, 1924, has not been obtained; also to refrain from giving intimation as to attitude of individual powers.
630

Kidnaping of Railway Passengers Near Lincheng by Bandits and Consequent Demands Upon China by the Powers

Date and number Subject Page
1923 May 6 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of train hold-up by bandits near Lincheng; capture of 19 foreigners including James B. Powell, an American; killing of British subject; also that inquiry is being made whether there were other Americans on train.
(Footnote: List of other Americans on train; those who escaped or were released; those held as captives.)
631
May 8 (140) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Representations by dean of diplomatic body to Chinese Government demanding measures to secure immediate release of foreign captives, payment of ransom by Chinese Government, strong military action to put down brigandage in Shantung, and an official inquiry. Prime Minister’s agreement to demands. Subsequent resolution of diplomatic body to demand progressive indemnity after May 12. British Minister’s proposal for adequate police protection on Tientsin-Pukow line under foreign supervision.
631
[Page LXXVII]May 9 (143) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Telegram from U. S. Minister from Tsinanfu, May 8 (text printed) reporting his demands upon Marshal Tsao Kun and military and civil governors; letter from Powell, May 6, transmitting bandit commander’s promise to release captives if troops withdrawn; release of several captives; telegram from Naill of Asia Development Co., May 8 (text printed) announcing his departure for bandit outpost with French and Italian consuls general to conduct negotiations; relief for released captives.
632
May 9 (145) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Acting Foreign Minister’s statement that attempts were being made to send supplies to captives through natives, that government would desist from military measures against bandits, and that he believed negotiations had begun. Presidential mandate ordering investigation of outrage.
634
May 10 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Presentation to Tien, Shantung Military Governor, of Naill’s telegrams reporting privations of captives and possibility they will be killed if Chinese authorities do not negotiate with bandits. Military Governor’s instructions to his generals to consult with Naill.
635
May 10 (148) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Telegram from consul at Lincheng (text printed) reporting release of two American boys, sons of men held by bandits; situation hopeful.
635
May 11 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conference with Chi, Military Governor at Nanking: Military Governor’s efforts in behalf of captives and promise of further instructions to his representatives concerning their immediate release; Minister’s intimation of possible foreign intervention. Information that Chi, Tien, Peking Government, and Tsao Kun are all in agreement.
635
May 11 (151) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Telegram sent to consul at Lincheng (text printed) instructing him and assistant military attaché to participate in joint inquiry at Lincheng into outrages; and informing him of selection of other representatives on the commission.
636
May 14 (156) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Telegrams from consul and assistant military attaché at Lincheng, May 13 and 14 (texts printed) reporting progress in negotiations with bandits, Roy S. Anderson’s participation, bandits’ demands. Diplomatic body’s decision to remind Foreign Office of progressive indemnity; and to address note to Foreign Office concerning policing of railway lines.
636
May 15 (157) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Notes from the dean of the diplomatic body to the Foreign Minister, May 14 (texts printed): (1) Insisting that Government reenforce troops and police guarding principal railways, informing Government of appointment of commission of foreign officers to investigate Chinese measures for protecting railways, and reserving right to take further action; (2) reminding Government of its responsibility for payment of ransom.
637
[Page LXXVIII]May 16 (161) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Diplomatic body’s decision to address further note to Foreign Office in view of unsatisfactory progress of negotiations with bandits; and to consult governments and senior naval officers concerning advisability of making joint naval demonstration at Taku near Tientsin.
639
May 17 (166) From the Counselor of Legation at Peking (tel.)
Memorandum handed by dean of diplomatic body to Acting Foreign Minister, May 16 (text printed) making further representations against delay in release of captives and reserving right to fix at later date nature and scope of sanctions.
640
May 18 (168) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on his conferences at Lincheng with consul and assistant military attaché and with representatives of various Chinese officials. Opinion that competition among Chinese officials on spot to obtain credit for effecting release of prisoners indicates that negotiations are reaching stage when success is probable. Institution of regular service of supply for captives.
641
May 18 (170) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that a naval demonstration is unnecessary and also likely to delay release of captives. British and French Ministers’ accord with views.
642
May 20 (174) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Release of French citizen by bandits to bring to diplomatic body at Peking and President of China the bandits’ threat to shoot two foreign captives if troops are not withdrawn, their refusal to negotiate until troops are withdrawn, and inclusion in their terms of a guarantee for their safety by six foreign powers.
643
May 23 (176) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul and assistant military attaché at Lincheng (text printed) reporting military situation and condition of captives. Detailed account of situation.
644
May 23 (178) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Adoption by diplomatic body of U. S. Minister’s suggestion to send to Tsaochwang an international commission of military commanders at Tientsin, or substitutes, to investigate and report upon military situation.
647
May 24 (179) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that consuls at Lincheng had been instructed, in accordance with resolution of diplomatic body, to convey to bandit chiefs a message (text printed) warning them that they would be held responsible with their lives for any fatality to foreign captives as result of delay or refusal to negotiate.
647
May 26 (182) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on various measures suggested for the protection of lives and property of foreigners. Inquiry whether United States would approve extension of use of armed force in China for protection of U. S. nationals in future.
648
[Page LXXIX]May 28 (185) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Bandits’ reply to message of diplomatic body that they would not endanger lives of foreigners and would accept reasonable terms; reiteration of demands.
649
May 29 (186) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement of the five demands made by the bandits.
649
May 31 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Unconditional release of two captives.
650
June 1 (193) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Meeting of international commission of inquiry, May 31, to receive instructions of diplomatic body and arrange program for Lincheng visit. Commission’s departure for Lincheng, June 1, U. S. representative on commission being accompanied by Congressman Wainwright of New York.
650
June 1 (97) To the Minister in China (tel.)
President Harding’s endorsement of Secretary’s view that general use of foreign force in China would be inadvisable. Request for Minister’s views on feasibility and possible usefulness of foreign occupation of railroad from Tientsin to Pukow in manner analogous to occupation of line from Peking to sea; also for views on British suggestion concerning railway police and on possibility of inducing Government to install a budget system under control of an international auditing board.
650
June 2 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Unconditional release of four more captives.
652
June 6 (199) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Congressman Wainwright’s arrival at Peking in advance of international commission and report that bandits and Governor of province appear to have reached agreement on taking bandits into army, but that bandits desire Roy Anderson’s personal guarantee as to their pay; that Anderson is willing provided he is guaranteed in writing, also personally, by Tsao Kun.
652
June 6 (200) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inadvisability of foreign occupation of Tientsin-Pukow railway. Views on foreign inspection or supervision of railway police force.
653
June 8 (207) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of international commission as to estimated number Chinese troops and number bandits within cordon; necessity for control of troops by Central Government; inadequacy of protection afforded Tientsin-Pukow railway.
654
June 10 (212) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Recommendation that 3d battalion of 15th Infantry be sent from Philippine Islands to Tientsin because of chaotic conditions in China.
655
June 10 (213) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from consul and assistant military attaché at Lincheng, June 9 (text printed) reporting bandits’ acceptance of all terms with request for 3 more days for enrollment into army; efforts to effect release of captives by Monday.
655
[Page LXXX]June 11 (214) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions, June 7, to consul and assistant military attaché at Lincheng to make clear to bandits that Anderson in no way represents the United States and that his signature to guarantee does not involve United States in any way. Their reply, June 10 (text printed) reporting satisfactory telegram from Tsao Kun regarding guarantee.
656
June 12 (107) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for fuller expression of views with respect to increasing U. S. forces at Tientsin and for a statement as to what action other powers may be contemplating.
656
June 12 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report from consul at Lincheng of release of all foreign captives. Opinion that credit for release is due U. S. consul at Lincheng, Roy Anderson, and Wen, Chinese Commissioner of Foreign Affairs.
657
June 14 (222) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Reasons for suggesting increase in U. S. forces at Tientsin. Conference with British, French, and Japanese colleagues regarding increasing their forces at Tientsin.
657
June 14 (223) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Appointment of committee by diplomatic corps to make recommendations for settlement with Chinese Government. Commission’s decision to demand (1) compensation, (2) guarantees for future, and (3) sanctions; agreement as to classes of compensation. Minister’s objections to addition of progressive indemnity to classes of compensation.
658
June 15 (226) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Committee’s adoption of guarantees for future (1) for imposition of penalties under 1901 protocol after inspection of troubled areas by foreign commission; and (2) for reforms in protection of Chinese railways. Committee’s decision that sanctions should include punishment of offending civil and military officials and employees of railway, and settlement of harbor improvement of Shanghai, with extension of International Settlement and reorganization of Mixed Court. Discussion of methods to secure enforcement of demands.
659
June 19 From the British Embassy
Expression of hope that United States will join in proposed concerted effort of diplomatic body to secure creation of railway police force under foreign officers and increased foreign control of railway revenues to pay force.
661
June 19 (229) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Recommendation that proposal for progressive indemnity be approved, in view of committee’s adoption of term indemnité to cover all classes of compensation, including claim for loss of liberty and for moral and physical sufferings of foreign captives.
661
[Page LXXXI]June 20 (231) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Committee’s adoption of sanctions (1) for punishment of Generals Tien, Ho, Chang, and Chao; and (2) for extension of Shanghai Settlement, improvement of Shanghai harbor, and reorganization of Mixed Court. Concluding section of note for Chinese Government as drafted by U. S. Minister (text printed). Committee’s decision not to report to diplomatic body until Governments have authorized measures for enforcing demands.
662
June 21 (118) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s disapproval of proposal to include in settlement of Lincheng affair such unrelated questions as extension of Shanghai Settlement, Mixed Court, etc., warning against any commitment until homogeneous plan can be authorized.
663
June 22 (233) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inclusion in committee’s report of claim for expense incurred by U. S. Chamber of Commerce, Shanghai, in providing subsistence and relief for captives.
664
June 22 (234) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Presentation of large claims by Major Allen, Major Pinger, and other victims of outrage.
664
June 22 (235) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Committee’s decision to leave certain categories of pecuniary indemnities for action of Legations, diplomatic body demanding indemnity only for loss of personal property, for loss of liberty, and for relief expenses.
664
June 23 (236) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Reasons why Shanghai demands should be sustained, not as claim for pecuniary indemnity but as total of progressive sanctions announced by diplomatic body on May 9.
665
June 23 (121) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s suggestion that small international force be stationed at Tsinan for a year, as specific penalty for outrage in Shantung Province. Approval, in principle, of British plan to create railway police force; also of proposed penalties, etc. Inquiry as to possible use of political crisis to gain Chinese acquiescence in demands, disapproving, however, any demonstration of force for such purpose.
666
June 25 (238) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Desirability of stationing a force at Tsinan larger than Department proposes.
668
June 26 (126) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Reasons for disapproval of proposed demands with respect to Shanghai. Belief that suggestions for establishment of railway police and stationing of troops at Tsinan carry out policy of progressive sanctions.
669
June 29 (241) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Notification to committee of U. S. disapproval of demands with respect to Shanghai; committee’s recognition of U. S. reasons as unanswerable.
671
[Page LXXXII]June 29 (242) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Intention of certain Americans to raise indemnity claims to $150,000 each.
671
June 30 (546) From the British Chargé
Approval of committee’s draft note to Chinese Government, with the exception of the demands with respect to Shanghai. Inquiry whether United States agrees to modified demands and whether United States would be prepared as last resort to enforce them by cooperating in naval demonstration, increasing garrison in North China, or establishment by powers of a railway police force.
671
July 2 (133) To the Minister in China (tel.)
No objections to categories of indemnities as designated in telegram no. 235, June 22. Authorization for acceptance by Legation of separate personal or supplementary claims.
674
July 9 To the British Chargé
General concurrence in principles set forth in British memorandum of June 30; doubt, however, that demands could be secured by naval demonstration; and suggestion that withdrawal of recognition might prove effective as means of exerting pressure.
675
July 9 (138) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Summary of British memorandum of June 30 and Department’s reply of July 9. Japanese disapproval of British suggestions concerning naval demonstration and organization of railway police force by powers.
(Instructions to repeat to Tokyo.)
677
July 16 (261) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Completion of draft note to Chinese Government, with progressive sanctions omitted, indemnity increased, and subject of railway police reserved for future communication. Merits of French proposal for police reorganization, which Japanese are more likely to support than British plan; Japanese desire that diplomatic body work out entire program.
678
July 24 (147) To the Minister in China (tel.)
View that it would be hazardous to present demands without at least exploring measures for exerting pressure upon China; that there is no essential difference between British and French proposals concerning railway police; that withdrawal of recognition from Peking Government would not involve withdrawal of Legations from Peking. Decision not to request War Department to dispatch additional troops.
680
July 28 To the British Embassy
Information that unqualified support cannot be given to plan for policing railways until practical details of plan have been agreed upon by diplomatic corps.
681
Aug. 14 (7732) From the Minister in China
Note from diplomatic body to Foreign Minister, August 10 (text printed) presenting categorical demands for damages, guarantees for future, and sanctions, as result of attack on foreigners at Lincheng.
682
[Page LXXXIII]Aug. 21 (289) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Details of plan for reorganization of Chinese railway police adopted by the committee August 20.
689
Aug. 25 (185) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Japanese amendments to plan for reorganization of Chinese railway police; Department’s concurrence, except in proposal to change foreign codirector to adviser.
690
Aug. 29 (296) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Incorporation of amendments in committee’s report to satisfaction of Japanese. Probability Chinese will reject plan as result of propaganda.
692
Sept. 28 (325) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s intimation, in interview September 21, that demand for dismissal of General Tien was greatest difficulty, and hint of compromise by permitting General Tien to resign. Consideration by diplomatic body, September 27, of methods for answering Chinese reply to demands.
694
Sept. 29 (1852) From the Minister in China
Foreign Minister’s reply, September 24, to diplomatic body’s demands (text printed), deploring Lincheng incident; and stating Chinese intention to accept all except supplementary indemnity claims, to reorganize railway police on own initiative, to punish all culpable officials, and to conduct new campaign against banditry.
695
Oct. 2 (328) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Decision of diplomatic body to make early counter reply to Chinese Government maintaining original demands en bloc; discussion of possibility of nonrecognition in case of refusal of new Chinese administration to comply with demands.
701
Oct. 3 (329) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japan’s decision to approve committee’s plan for reorganization of Chinese railway police.
702
Oct. 4 (211) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Interview with Chinese Minister wherein Minister expressed hope that Lincheng demands would be reconsidered, especially supplemental indemnities, and Secretary replied that changes were unlikely.
702
Oct. 4 (212) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram, October 3, from Chinese Foreign Minister to Chinese Minister at Washington (text printed) instructing him to make representations against diplomatic body’s insistence on original demands.
704
Oct. 5 (331) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Diplomatic body’s note to Foreign Minister, October 4 (text printed) maintaining original demands.
704
Oct. 9 (336) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese efforts to reach settlement, as result of decision of diplomatic corps not to attend inaugural reception to be held October 10. Possibility that diplomatic corps may accept compromise of resignation of General Tien.
705
[Page LXXXIV]Oct. 15 The Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Dean of the Diplomatic Corps at Peking
Further concessions to demands, China agreeing in principle to inclusion of supplementary indemnities; information that General Tien has been removed and campaign against banditry has been renewed.
706
Oct. 18 (224) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to report concerning oral understanding between dean of diplomatic corps and Chinese Foreign Office regarding railway police scheme.
708
Oct. 20 (352) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Explanation that dean’s acceptance of terms of Chinese Foreign Minister’s note was conditional on understanding that Chinese Government would receive and consider diplomatic body’s scheme for reorganization of railway police. Dean’s proposal that Chinese Government be permitted to submit its own scheme framed upon confidential copy of diplomatic body’s scheme. Publication simultaneously, October 16, of mandates relieving General Tien from office and elevating him to marshal.
708
Oct. 24 (229) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Disappointment that Tien’s dismissal should be rendered nugatory by simultaneous promotion.
709

Amends by the Chinese Government for the Killing of Charles Coltman, an American Citizen, by Chinese Soldiers in the Presence of an American Consul

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Dec. 12 (489) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Shooting of Charles Coltman, U. S. merchant, by Chinese soldiers, following dispute as to Coltman’s right to leave Kalgan in automobile with silver currency.
709
Dec. 13 (492) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Presence of U. S. consul at Kalgan in car with Coltman when shooting occurred. Representations to Foreign Office, demanding arrest and trial of offenders and reserving rights as to conditions of settlement.
710
Dec. 15 (495) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Death of Coltman. Oral representations to Premier and Foreign Minister charging Kalgan soldiers with murder of U. S. citizen and with firing on U. S. official. Recommendations as to amends to be demanded of Chinese Government and request for instructions. Details of case.
710
Dec. 20 (294) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s approval of suggested amends to be demanded of Chinese Government, and inquiry as to earning capacity of Coltman and financial condition of dependents. Advisability of issuing instructions to consular officers to prevent possible future abuse of U. S. privileges, in view of fact that Coltman was transporting funds for Chinese banks.
712
[Page LXXXV]Dec. 22 (502) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Unsatisfactory and frivolous note from Foreign Office contending that soldiers fired in self-defense, as consul and Coltman had fired first shots; that there was an administrative order prohibiting exportation of moneys from Kalgan; and that moneys belonged to Chinese banks. Consul’s denial that Americans fired first shots. Explanation that neither consul nor Legation had been informed of administrative order and that question of money belonging to Chinese banks had not been raised at time of incident.
713
Dec. 23 (297) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions, if investigation proves that soldiers’ plea of self-defense was not justified, to advise Foreign Office that U. S. Government supports Minister’s previous statements. Instructions also, if Chinese Government fails to act promptly, to indicate that United States considers this a test of confidence in Chinese Government and that it will influence U. S. attitude toward Boxer indemnity and other pending questions.
713
1923 Jan. 2 (2) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conviction after investigation that none of Americans attempted to fire. Note to Foreign Minister refuting Chinese contentions; and demanding apologies from Chinese to U. S. Government and from Military Governor to consul, dismissal and punishment of responsible officers, indemnity, cancelation of transportation prohibition, etc. Information that Military Governor was absent from Kalgan at time Coltman was shot.
714
Jan. 3 (4) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s request that U. S. demands be withdrawn pending receipt of Chinese report on investigations and expression of regret; U. S. Minister’s refusal and further representations. Note from Foreign Minister (text printed) apologizing to U. S. Government for incident and reserving to some future communication further consideration of case. Opinion that there will be discussion, haggling, and delay with respect to other demands.
715
Jan. 4 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Conversation with Chinese Chargé, in which Chargé, upon being informed of the extreme seriousness with which United States regarded the Coltman case, volunteered to send a strong cable to his Government.
716
Jan. 13 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Further conversation with Chinese Chargé: Chargé’s disposition to argue certain points reported by Chinese investigating committee; division chief’s refutation, stating that China seeks to evade issue and find excuses for delay; Chargé’s promise to send another strong telegram urging prompt settlement of main issues.
717
Jan. 17 (21) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s contention that settlement of case is matter of practicability as well as justice; indemnity and punishment of officers the chief obstacles to adjustment.
718
[Page LXXXVI]Jan. 30 (36) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Further representations to Premier repudiating contentions that U. S. demands are unjust and that Chinese tribunals should determine matter, and placing responsibility for crime on Kalgan military officers acting in contravention of U. S. treaty rights. Premier’s postponement of reply to U. S. demands.
720
Jan. 31 (21) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to inform Premier that Military Governor’s obstruction of justice in Coltman case is in effect ratification by him of his subordinates’ action and that, unless satisfaction is given within reasonable time, United States will add to terms a demand for his dismissal from office. Request for Minister’s views.
722
Feb. 11 (48) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Further unsatisfactory reply received from Foreign Office February 10 (text printed).
723
Feb. 13 (30) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Concurrence in Minister’s view that latest Foreign Office reply is unsatisfactory. Request for views on Department’s telegram no. 21, January 31.
724
Feb. 14 (53) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that demand for dismissal of Military Governor would appear unfair and also that it could not be obtained; and that time limit for settlement of Coltman case would serve no good purpose.
724
Feb. 15 (56) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Further conversation with Premier, centering on Premier’s proposal to have Tutung voluntarily punish officers to avoid violation of Chinese sentiment, with Premier’s guarantee that penalties would meet U. S. demands; inferiority of consul’s rank an obstacle to apology from Tutung.
725
Feb. 19 (35) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s unconcern as to method of Chinese in arranging for punishment of officers, provided consul at Kalgan is witness to infliction of penalties.
726
Feb. 23 (37) To the Minister in China (tel.)
View that penalties imposed by Tutung were too mild and that punishment cannot be of value unless delivered publicly in presence of consul. Reliance upon Minister’s judgment as to advisability of demanding more satisfactory action.
727
Mar. 14 (1410) From the Minister in China
Note from Foreign Minister, March 2 (text printed) transmitting formal apology of Military Governor to U. S. Minister for death of Coltman and what purports to be apology for attack on U. S. consul. Note to Foreign Minister, March 27 (text printed) agreeing to modify demand for apology from Tutung and reiterating unfulfilled demand for punishment of officers and unacceptability of indemnity offer.
727
[Page LXXXVII]Apr. 7 (59) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to report upon status of Coltman case; and authorization, at Minister’s discretion, to issue public statement to correct any impression that case has been settled to satisfaction of United States or that United States is permitting case to be dropped.
731
Apr. 18 (112) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Further negotiations resulting in Chinese proposition that no further demands for apology be made upon Tutung, that punishment of three officers be limited to summary dismissal, and that size of indemnity be determined by United States subject to Chinese approval. Recommendation that proposition be accepted. Opinion that no satisfactory settlement can be obtained without use of diplomatic pressure hurtful to China.
732
Apr. 26 (73) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Acceptance of Chinese proposal concerning determination of size of indemnity; unsatisfactoriness of suggestions concerning punishment of officers and apology by Tutung. Desire that offending officers be barred from Government employment in future and insistence that Tutung make formal apology at Kalgan consulate or to U. S. Minister.
734
May 4 (129) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Presentation to Foreign Minister of U. S. refusal to accept Chinese proposals, Conference with Tsao Kun at Paotingfu and Tsao Kun’s promise to have Tutung offer suitable apology at U. S. Legation.
735
May 5 (131) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Apology of Tutung of Chahar at Legation for the firing on U. S. consul and Coltman. Request that indemnity be fixed promptly.
736
May 16 (83) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advisability of reserving right to protest in event dismissed officers are again taken into military service. Fixing of indemnity for Coltman’s death at 25,000 gold dollars.
737
May 26 (184) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Dismissal of chief of staff and other responsible officers, and acceptance of U. S. claims for $25,000 indemnity.
(Footnote: Payment of claim on September 20.)
737

Refusal by the United States To Recognize the Applicability of Chinese Martial Law to American Citizens or to American Naval Vessels

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Aug. 18 (208) To the Minister in China
Opinion that declaration of martial law by Chinese authorities cannot operate to deprive U. S. citizens of any fights-or privileges enjoyed by reason of existing treaties between the United States and China.
738
[Page LXXXVIII]Nov. 26 (1952) From the Minister in China
Note from commissioner of foreign affairs of Kwangtung Province to U. S. consul general at Canton, November 7 (text printed) announcing restrictions upon movements of foreign vessels in ports and interior rivers owing to declaration of martial law; consul general’s reply, November 13 (text printed) denying right of local authorities to interfere with movements of U. S. vessels. Minister’s approval, with comment that consul general might have indicated that movements of U. S. vessels are based upon treaty stipulations; and Minister’s desire to circularize consuls in China in regard to incident.
739
1924 Jan. 29 (556) To the Minister in China
Article IX of the treaty of 1858 (text printed) stipulating rights of U. S. vessels in Chinese waters. Approval of Minister’s comment on treaty stipulations and his proposal to circularize consuls in China.
740

Increase of Lawlessness on the Upper Yangtze River and Recommendations by American Officers in China To Reenforce the American Gunboat Patrol

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 20 (1422) From the Minister in China
Note from U. S., British, French, and Japanese representatives to Foreign Office, March 19 (text printed) making joint representations regarding outrages against foreign life and property on Upper Yangtze and transmitting memorandum prepared February 19 by senior officers of principal naval forces operating on Yangtze River (text printed).
741
June 13 (1605) From the Minister in China
Recommendation that six new river gunboats be constructed for proper protection of U. S. lives and property in region of Yangtze.
744
July 27 (264) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from commander of the Yangtze Patrol (text printed) reporting attacks on U. S. S. Alice Dollar and Monocacy, and defeat by latter vessel of attempt to establish illegal blockade of Chungking.
745
Aug. 6 (27403–340:23) From the Acting Secretary of the Navy
Inclusion in budget estimates for next Congress of a request for the construction of six river gunboats for service on the Yangtze River. Inquiry as to desirability of requesting emergency appropriation for their immediate construction.
746
Aug. 20 To the Secretary of the Navy
Opinion that contemplated request for emergency appropriation for gunboats on Yangtze is fully warranted.
747
Aug. 28 (27403–340: 23) From the Acting Secretary of the Navy
Inadequacy of vessels constituting the Yangtze River Patrol; and reasons for requesting Congress for new vessels specially designed for service on Chinese rivers.
747
[Page LXXXIX]Oct. 16 To the Secretary of the Navy
Gratification over inclusion in Navy Department’s estimates for coming year of six new river gunboats especially designed for service on Chinese rivers. Review of need for maintaining adequate naval patrol on Yangtze.
748
Dec. 31 (525) To the Minister in China
Disapproval of official acquiescence on part of U. S. representatives in China to search of U. S. merchantmen by unarmed insurgents; inadvisability, however, of withdrawal by consul at Chungking from position already taken in Foochow case.
750
1924 Feb. 5 (27403–340:39–L) From the Secretary of the Navy
Information that proposed legislation regarding six new gunboats is not in conflict with President’s financial program. Presentation of proposed legislation to House, with recommendation for enactment.
(Footnote: Construction of six new river gunboats authorized by act by Congress approved December 18, 1924, and gunboats completed in 1928.)
751

Relation of Consular Officers to Other American Officers in China

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Oct. 30 To Diplomatic and Consular Officers in China
Instructions relative to administrative duties, representation, and rank of U. S. consular officers in China, defining their relation to officers of U. S. Court for China and to officials of other branches of U. S. Government in China.
751
1923 Feb. 22 (58) From the Vice Consul in Charge at Chungking
Interpretation of Navy regulations by commanders of the Monocacy and Palos as giving commander of the Monocacy the right to attempt to secure settlement at Wanhsien of a civil claim of the Standard Oil Co. of New York. Vice consul’s disagreement with interpretation; and letter, January 22, from the commander of the Yangtze River Patrol to the commander of the Monocacy, also disagreeing with interpretation (text printed).
752

Final Report of the President of the Inter-Allied Technical Board for the Supervision of the Chinese Eastern and Siberian Rail ways

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 15 From the President of the Technical Board
Final report upon activities and conditions surrounding work of Inter-Allied Technical Board.
758
Mar. 29 To the President of the Technical Board
Expression of high appreciation of services rendered by President of Technical Board in supervision of Chinese Eastern and Siberian Railways, and also of work of technical and clerical subordinates.
775
Apr. 17 From the President of the Technical Board
Final balance sheet, as of April 17, 1923, covering U. S. share of Allied fund advanced for supervising Chinese Eastern and Siberian Railways.
777
[Page XC]

Foreign Representations Dissuading Chang Tso-lin From Assuming Control of the Land Office of the Chinese Eastern Railway

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 31 From the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
Demand of General Chang Huan-hsiang of Harbin, acting allegedly under instructions of General Chang Tso-lin of Mukden, that land department of Chinese Eastern Railway be handed over to him. Efforts of U. S., British, French, and Japanese consuls to delay step pending instructions from their respective Ministers.
778
Aug. 2 (159) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to make representations to Chinese Government against alteration of status quo. Suggestion that powers participating in Washington Conference make joint representations.
778
Aug. 2 From the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
Failure of General Chang Huan-hsiang’s attempt to take over land department on August 1 because of opposition of railway officials and representatives of the Russo-Asiatic Bank. Apparent weakening of Chinese officials in their aggressive attitude and endeavor to find satisfactory retreat.
779
Aug. 12 (284) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Minister’s representations to Foreign Office, August 3; also French protest. Joint U. S., British, French, and Japanese representations, August 11; and instructions to consular officers at Mukden to make friendly representations to Chang Tso-lin. Absence of Italian, Belgian, and Portuguese Ministers from Peking.
(Footnote: Notification that Italian Minister joined in representations.)
779
Aug. 21 (290) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Admission by Chang Tso-lin, in conference with consuls at Mukden, of incorrect procedure of Harbin officials; his assurances of no intention to confiscate railway property although control over settlements is sought.
780
Sept. 14 (313) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Minister’s trip to Harbin and other points on Chinese Eastern Railway; his speech, September 6, at Harbin; his conference with Chang Tso-lin, September 10, in which Minister suggested that Chang might solve his difficulties by suspending order creating new land department, pending conferences between Harbin authorities and railway company.
780
Sept. 18 (315) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Press account (text printed) of order by Chang Tso-lin to postpone taking over of railway land department, pending discussion of subject by railway directors, foreign consuls, and Chinese officials.
782
[Page XCI]

Continued Support by the United States to the Federal Telegraph Company in Efforts To Obtain Execution of Its Contract With the Chinese Government

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 10 (47) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japan’s further protest to China against execution of terms of Federal Telegraph Co.’s contract as infringement on Mitsui contract. China’s reasons for refusing to consummate with Federal Co. arrangements made necessary by inclusion of Radio Corporation of America. Official request that U. S. Government secure withdrawal of Japanese protest.
783
Feb. 14 (54) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Doubtful outlook for conclusion of Federal contract because of China’s reported desire to remain on friendly terms with opposition cable companies and because of report that British, French, and Japanese radio groups have agreed to pool their radio interests in China, which agreement is endorsed by Great Northern Telegraph Co. Informal representations to Chinese officials urging immediate conclusion of Federal agreement to prevent alien radio monopoly.
783
Feb. 16 (60) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that Chinese vacillation might be overcome if Chinese Chargé at Washington could be induced to cable his Government a report of strong U. S. representations for immediate conclusion of Federal agreement.
784
Feb. 28 (70) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese Cabinet’s affirmation, February 27, of its intention to execute the Federal contract; reluctance, however, to take necessary measures for contract’s execution until Japanese opposition has been overcome.
785
Mar. 1 (1387) From the Minister in China
Note to Foreign Office, February 13 (text printed) making representations against Mitsui Co.’s claim to exclusive rights as being contrary to Chinese treaty obligations and not in accord with spirit of the nine-power treaty concerning China; and requesting that necessary steps be taken to execute Federal contract.
786
Mar. 8 To the Chinese Legation
Representations against Japanese interference with execution of Federal contract as being contrary to principle of open door reasserted and confirmed by the nine-power treaty and the Shantung Agreement; reservation of all rights with respect to any purported telegraph and cable monopoly.
788
Mar. 8 To the Japanese Embassy
Representations against interference with execution of Federal contract as being contrary to provisions of Shantung Agreement concerning monopolies; reservation of all rights with respect to any purported telegraph and cable monopoly.
789
Apr. 10 (100) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Prime Minister’s obstructive tactics. Notes to Foreign Office, March 15 and 22, demanding replies to former communications; also interview, April 2, with Prime Minister. Suggestion that Secretary of State telegraph strong personal message for presentation to Wellington Koo, new Foreign Minister.
790
[Page XCII]Apr. 22 (117) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japan’s urgent representations to Chinese officials that Federal contract should not be considered by Cabinet at present, on ground that negotiations are being conducted with U. S. Government by Japanese Ambassador at Washington.
791
Apr. 24 (72) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to advise Foreign Office and other interested authorities that no negotiations are in progress with Japan regarding Federal contract; that United States has merely addressed a remonstrance to Japan against interference with Federal contract. Inability of United States to comprehend China’s withdrawal of cooperation and apparent willingness to permit continued delays.
791
May 28 (416) From the British Ambassador
Opinion that recommendations of experts put forward on February 4, 1922, at the Washington Conference provide the best solution and should be generally approved and put into execution. Inquiry as to U. S. views.
793
June 7 (202) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese Cabinet’s decision to postpone execution of Federal contract until settlement with Japanese. Request that strong protest be expressed to Chinese Minister at Washington.
794
June 7 (204) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Expiration of Federal option February 28 and its renewal until July 15. Request for confirmation of report that Radio Corp. will not extend present agreement beyond July 15 and may thereafter be compelled to enter into arrangements with Mitsui Co.
795
June 9 (103) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for views of Minister and of Schwerin, President of Federal Co., as to three alternative methods of procedure regarding wireless communication with China.
796
June 12 (216) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Schwerin’s views (text printed) and Minister’s comments and recommendations regarding alternative methods of procedure, both approving independent Federal contract.
798
June 19 (115) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Explanation as to differences between alternative proposals. Inquiry whether Schwerin approves giving British copies of proposed modifications in Federal contract.
801
June 20 (506) From the British Ambassador
Renewal of inquiry as to U. S. views regarding experts’ recommendations.
803
June 25 (237) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Schwerin’s reply (text printed) commenting on trend of negotiations away from Federal contract in favor of international wireless agreement on basis of experts’ recommendations; and indicating his concurrence in giving desired information to British with request that it be considered confidential.
803
[Page XCIII]June 25 (239) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Hope that Department will bring strong pressure upon Chinese Minister to urge his Government to carry out Federal contract.
804
June 28 To the Secretary of the British Embassy
Expression of regret at inability to communicate details of proposed amendments to Federal contract as requested; assurance, however, that they will not be incompatible with recommendations of radio experts.
804
June 28 (128) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Radio Corp.’s terms for going forward with Federal enterprise, which includes corporation’s purchase of the interests of Federal Co. of California. Disinclination of Department to pass on corporation’s suggestions. Request for views of Minister and Schwerin.
805
July 3 (248) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Message from Schwerin (text printed) acquiescing in Radio Corp.’s suggestions and in any action corporation representative may take at London meeting.
808
July 5 (249) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Chinese Foreign Office to Chinese Minister at Washington (text printed) informing him of Cabinet’s decision to maintain Federal contract; completion of Mitsui station by end of July and Government’s intention to take over station according to supplementary contract, thus enabling Federal contract to proceed.
808
July 12 (583) From the British Chargé
Inquiry as to correctness of provisions of clause of Federal’s supplementary agreement of September 19, 1921, relating to handling of Chinese-American traffic (text printed). Comment that clause appears to be inconsistent with U. S. assurances and with memorandum of experts at Washington Conference.
808
July 14 (259) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Substitution of introduction (text printed) for preamble and Article 2 of Federal contract; signature and affixing of official seal to document by Ministry of Communications, July 13; Schwerin’s request that notice be sent to Radio Corp. and Federal Co., but not made public until August 7.
809
July 19 To the British Chargé
Statement that U. S. assurances covered only the proposed amendments and not the basic agreements themselves; that the clause relating to handling of Chinese-American traffic (text printed) is contained in one of the basic agreements; also that the traffic arrangement does not constitute a monopoly in contravention to the memorandum of experts at Washington Conference.
810
July 19 (304) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Owen D. Young and General Harbord of Radio Corp.: Request for attitude toward proposal to proceed under Federal contract prior to time when Great Northern Cable Co. grant for monopoly of Chinese external communications expires in 1929; also toward exchange of messages as tests between Mitsui station at Peking and Radio Corp.’s Long Island and San Francisco stations.
812
[Page XCIV]July 21 (293) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform Radio Corp. officials of Department’s opinion that under treaty stipulations China had no power to grant monopoly such as is claimed by Great Northern Cable Co. or to divest U. S. interests, for that company’s benefit, of their existing rights; Department’s consent to proposed tests with Mitsui station, on understanding that any arrangement for exchange of traffic would be subject to Department’s approval.
813
July 25 (612) From the British Chargé
Information that British Minister at Peking has been instructed to defend Marconi Co.’s interests insofar as they are affected by Federal agreement, and that British Government must continue to oppose Federal contract until United States accepts Washington experts’ recommendations.
814
July 26 To the British Chargé
Information that Department is prepared to advise U. S. firms that it has no objection to their coming to an arrangement with British, French, and Japanese radio interests on basis of recommendations of Washington experts, upon understanding that this does not imply U. S. recognition of monopolistic or exclusive rights claimed by cable companies and upon condition that governments concerned likewise give approval.
815
July 27 To the British Chargé
Request to be apprised as to whether British Government intends to support Marconi Co.’s monopolistic claim or whether it is prepared to give assurance that it will support only such enterprise as involves no monopolistic element or abridgement of equality of opportunity.
816
Aug. 13 (678) From the British Chargé
Information that U. S. acceptance of experts’ recommendations has removed grounds for opposition to Federal contract and that British Minister at Peking will be instructed accordingly.
817
Aug. 16 From the President of the Radio Corporation of America
Interview of Radio Corp. officials with representatives of British Marconi Co. and Compagnie Générale de Télégraphie at London, July 19, on Chinese radio communications.
818
Aug. 31 To the President of the Radio Corporation of America
Renewal of suggestion that traffic arrangements with Mitsui station should be declined until diplomatic questions have been adjusted.
819
Aug. 31 To the Federal Telegraph Company
Suggestion that company consider advisability of coming to an agreement with British, French, and Japanese radio interests on basis of Washington experts’ recommendations.
820
Aug. 31 To the Vice President of the International Western Electric Company
Direction of attention to experts’ recommendations for broadening of China National Wireless Co. to facilitate manufacture in China of radio apparatus; and suggestion that International Western Electric Co. consider advisability of arrangement on basis of these recommendations.
820
[Page XCV]Nov. 5 To the President of the Federal Telegraph Company of Delaware
Acknowledgment of notice that Federal Telegraph Co. of California has assigned rights and titles to Federal Telegraph Co. of Delaware for erection of wireless stations in China; information that Minister at Peking has been instructed to render all appropriate diplomatic support in connection with fulfillment of Federal contract.
821
Nov. 8 (951) From the British Chargé
Japan’s disposition to accept and expedite plan of cooperation recommended by experts, subject to two conditions regarding paragraphs 2 and 6 of the Washington experts’ recommendations. Inquiry whether United States will be disposed to meet objections of Japan.
822
Nov. 24 To the British Chargé
Inability to meet Japan’s objections to experts’ recommendations.
823
Dec. 27 (257) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese Foreign Minister’s suggestion that United States send China a note expressing continued interest of U. S. Government in Federal enterprise, to counteract Japanese opposition. Instructions to consult Foreign Minister before presenting note.
824
Dec. 31 (433) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of Japan’s appeals to China for maintenance of monopoly clause in Mitsui contract. Opinion that U. S. consideration would be given suggested joint control of wireless by Japanese, Chinese, and U. S. interests, if Mitsui station only was involved. Presentation of memorandum refuting Japan’s contentions.
825

Rejection by Japan of the Proposal by China To Abrogate the Agreements of May 25, 1915

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Mar. 27 (174) To the Chargé in Japan
Chinese note of March 10 to Japan (text printed) proposing abrogation of treaties and of exchanges of notes of May 25, 1915. Japan’s reply, March 14 (text printed) rejecting proposal. Japanese Ambassador’s request for Secretary’s observations on subject; latter’s refusal to make any comment or add anything to what he had said upon this subject at Washington Conference.
826
Apr. 5 (57) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to state that no interview with Chinese Chargé has taken place on subject of retrocession of leased territory in China, and to refer, in this connection, to U. S. position as spread on records of Washington Conference.
830
[Page XCVI]

COLOMBIA

Employment of American Financial Advisers by the Government of Colombia

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Dec. 19 (544) From the Colombian Minister
Request that names of qualified U. S. experts be suggested as technical financial advisers to Colombian Government, particularly in organizing Bank of Issue and in making study of changes in national finance system.
831
1923 Feb. 13 (578) To the Minister in Colombia
Department’s recommendation of Professor E. W. Kemmerer as head of financial mission to Colombia; his qualifications. Names of other experts recommended. Status of mission.
831

COSTA RICA

Protocol of Agreement Between the United States and Costa Rica Relating to an Interoceanic Canal, and the Failure of Costa Rica To Ratify

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 20 To President Harding
Draft protocol (text printed) of agreement between the United States and Costa Rica in regard to future negotiations for construction of an interoceanic canal by way of Lake Nicaragua.
834
Mar. 27 (19) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Report that Costa Rican ratification of canal protocol is doubtful.
835
Mar. 31 (10) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to make no representations to secure desired ratification of protocol.
835
Apr. 14 (23) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Report that President has withdrawn canal protocol from Congress.
836

CUBA

Failure of President Zayas To Apply Vigorously the Program of Reform

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 13 Memorandum by Mr. A. N. Young of the Office of the Economic Adviser, Department of State
Department’s approval of draft paragraph (text printed) to be inserted in prospectus for Cuban loan to be floated by J. P. Morgan & Co.
837
Feb. 3 (C–S–258) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Letter from representative of J. P. Morgan & Co., January 22 (text printed) requesting advice concerning Cuban Cabinet crisis and possible Cabinet changes. Note from President Zayas, February 1 (text printed) giving assurances that he had no intention of making Cabinet changes; and conveying information that decrees were being prepared nullifying old public works contracts.
838
[Page XCVII]Feb. 23 To the Ambassador in Cuba
Expression of gratification at President Zayas’ assurances concerning Cabinet changes and at information regarding annulment of old public works contracts.
843
July 11 (47) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Passage, with great secrecy, of bill reorganizing national lottery. Ambassador’s purpose to request Presidential veto if bill is inimical to lottery reform.
844
July 13 (57) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Aide-mémoire handed to Cuban Chargé (text printed) making representations against alleged lottery reorganization.
844
July 24 (51) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Passage of lottery bill by Lower House over President’s veto; Lower House resolution giving reasons for overriding veto.
845
July 25 (52) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Passage of lottery bill by Senate over President’s veto; Senate resolution making objectionable reference to U. S. interference.
846
July 28 (63) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Instructions to come to Washington for conference.
(Footnote: Ambassador left Habana August 2 and remained in the United States until December 14.)
846
Aug. 18 (260) From the Chargé in Cuba
Decree authorizing payment of 7 million dollars to the United States as balance of 10-million-dollar loan of 1917, payment to be effected through National City Bank of New York and J. P. Morgan & Co.
847
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Cuban Chargé, August 21, 1923
Discussion of press reports regarding possible U. S. intervention in Cuba. Secretary’s assertion that efforts of the United States have been directed to help Cuba, but that lottery law points to another era of corruption; and that, if Cuba persists in this course, United States cannot be held responsible for the inevitable disaster.
847
Aug. 31 To the Cuban Chargé
Liquidation of demand obligations of Cuban Government dated March 27 and November 4, 1918, with accrued interest due the United States, and arrangements for surrender of collateral security.
848
Sept. 11 (91) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Authorization to state to Diaz Albertini, representative of Liberal leaders in Cuban Congress, that repeal of new lottery law would be gratifying; also that if Cuban Congress rejects U. S. advice and an unstable and inefficient government results, it must accept responsibility for the situation.
849
[Page XCVIII]Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Appointed Cuban Ambassador, November 15, 1923
Secretary’s welcome and assurances of U. S. friendly attitude toward Cuba; his statement that United States had no intention of intervening in Cuba unless Cuba herself made it necessary; his assertion that United States had been disquieted by conditions in Cuba, especially by the passage of the lottery law.
850
Dec. 13 Extracts from the Remarks of the Cuban Ambassador on the Occasion of His Reception by President Coolidge
Reference to past relations between the two Governments and U. S. role in Cuban affairs since joint resolution of 1898; statement of Cuba’s national principles and desire for continuance of friendly advice and aid of United States.
851
Dec. 13 President Coolidge’s Reply to the Remarks of the Cuban Ambassador on the Occasion of His Reception
Expression of pleasure upon receipt of credentials as first Cuban Ambassador to the United States and assurance of continuance of solicitude for welfare of Cuba and of friendly advice and aid of United States.
853

Revision of the Cuban Railway-Merger and Ports-Closing Bill Upon Representations by the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 21 (92) To the Ambassador in Cuba
Instructions to investigate and report on proposed Tarafa bill for consolidation of railways and reclassification of ports, latter measure imposing a high duty on sugar shipped from private wharves not connected with consolidated railways.
854
July 27 (220) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Report of preliminary investigation of Tarafa bill; information of appointment of committee by various U. S. companies to oppose bill and of demands upon both Houses for open hearings on measure.
855
Aug. 10 (67) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Note for Cuban Government (text printed) stating U. S. objections to Tarafa bill and expressing hope that legislation will not be enacted without affording opportunity for presentation of objections by all interested parties and consideration of probable effects.
857
Aug. 11 (72) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Presentation of note regarding Tarafa bill, as instructed.
859
Aug. 23 (78) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Tarafa’s conference with Department. Proposed conference between Tarafa and sugar interests to discuss elimination from bill of provision closing existing private ports, retention of provisions prohibiting imports through such ports, and addition of provision prohibiting in future the establishment of private ports.
859
[Page XCIX]Aug. 30 (296) From the Chargé in Cuba
Press report of compromise reached in New York between Tarafa and U. S. sugar interests eliminating confiscatory clauses in bill. Formidable opposition in Cuba to bill as being monopolistic and otherwise objectionable.
859
Sept. 13 (96) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Receipt of Tarafa bill as accepted by leaders in Congress, with monopolistic features seemingly removed and apparently carrying out agreement with sugar companies. Information that Senate will consider bill September 18.
861
Sept. 29 (96) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Passage of Tarafa bill by both Houses of Cuban Congress. Instructions to request President to interview representative of certain U. S. interests regarding manner in which U. S. rights are prejudiced by bill.
861
Oct. 9 (125) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Signature of Tarafa bill by President Zayas. Expectation that his promised interpretation of bill will give satisfaction to U. S. interests.
861

Establishment of Federal Reserve Bank Agencies in Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Apr. 17 (33) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Proposal of Federal Reserve Bank of Boston to open agency in Habana, where First National Bank of Boston would establish branch office. Request for opinion.
862
Apr. 17 (17) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Opinion that conditions are favorable to success of proposed agency and that announcement of the project would be helpful in present Cuban crisis.
862
Undated [Rec’d May 5] (24) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Suggestion for conference between Governor Harding and Federal Reserve Board. Comments on absorption of private banking interests in Cuba by Canadian banks, whose economic interests are unimportant compared with those of United States. Opinion that Federal Reserve Board agency would provide needed competition to combat exorbitant interest rates and to strengthen U. S. banking influence in Cuba.
862
May 8 (39) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Concurrence of Governor Harding in opinion of Federal Reserve Board that proposed central bank in Cuba cannot be established under Federal Reserve Act. Possibility, however, that Board may establish agency in Cuba.
864
June 29 (54) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Decision of Federal Reserve Board to grant to Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and Boston each an agency in Cuba to cooperate as agents of Federal Reserve Banks.
865
[Page C]

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

Exchange of Notes Between the United States and Czechoslovakia Mutually According Most-Favored-Nation Treatment in Customs Matters

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 19 (27) To the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether it would be agreeable to Czechoslovak Government to negotiate a general treaty of amity, commerce, and consular rights with the United States.
866
July 21 (34) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Assurance by Foreign Minister that Czechoslovakia will be glad to negotiate general treaty.
866
Aug. 3 (131) To the Minister in Czechoslovakia
Transmittal of draft of proposed treaty for submission to Government.
866
Aug. 30 (39) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Hesitation in presenting draft treaty, no provision having been made therein regarding import license system. Suggestion of temporary arrangement by exchange of notes, to avoid penalization of U. S. imports. Government’s approval of tentative draft (text printed) proposing provisional agreement on most-favored-nation basis, pending conclusion of treaty.
867
Sept. 6 (35) To the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Draft of note for presentation to Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting unconditional most-favored-nation treatment of U. S. products with respect to quantities, valuation, licensing, and import and export duties, pending conclusion of general treaty.
868
Sept. 6 (505) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia
Assertion that ordinary provisions regarding most-favored-nation clause will not protect U. S. commerce in Czechoslovakia; explanation of results of import license system, necessitating some special arrangement such as exchange of notes.
868
Sept. 26 (41) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Explanation that term “quantities” must be omitted from exchange of notes or matter left for special arrangements; urgency of accepting provisional agreement to assist importers of U. S. goods unable to compete with other countries enjoying lower treaty rates.
870
Oct. 11 (38) To the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Willingness to omit word “quantities” from exchange of notes. Proposed amendment to draft note (text printed).
871
Oct. 24 (45) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Expectation of early exchange of notes; change in draft note to make most-favored-nation treatment effective November 5.
873
Oct. 29 (444) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia to the Czechoslovak Minister for Foreign Affairs
Expression of hope that commercial relations may be maintained on basis of unconditional most-favored-nation treatment, pending the conclusion of a general treaty of amity, commerce, and consular rights, or until January 1, 1925.
873
Oct. 29 (182.207/iv/4–23) The Czechoslovak Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chargé in Czechoslovakia
Assurance that most-favored-nation treatment will be accorded to commerce of United States, pending the conclusion of a general treaty, or until January 1, 1925.
874
[Page CI]Oct. 30 (47) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Notification that exchange of notes has been effected; Government’s assurances as to quantities of restricted imports. Inquiry whether full treaty draft may now be presented.
875
Nov. 16 (49) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Effectiveness of agreement since November 5, although not yet ratified by Parliament.
875

Appointment of a Czechoslovak Commission To Negotiate a General Refunding of the Indebtedness of Czechoslovakia to the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 7 (353) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia
Foreign Minister’s hesitation in moving to prompt funding of Czechoslovak debt to United States because of loyalty to certain other nations unable to discharge their obligations. Minister’s representations as to difference between Czechoslovak and French obligations and advantages to Czechoslovakia from funding of debt.
876
Feb. 19 (4) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Government’s intention to send commission to the United States to negotiate terms of payment.
876
Mar. 13 (10) To the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Desirability of receiving binding obligations from Czechoslovak Debt Mission relative to outstanding and unsettled accounts of Czechoslovakia, to facilitate negotiations with World War Foreign Debt Commission.
877
Mar. 21 (15) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Purposes and organization of special debt commission.
877
Apr. 30 (23) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Departure of debt commission for the United States with authorization to conduct negotiations for repayment, subject to final approval by Government.
878
May 2 (436) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia
Note from Foreign Minister, April 30 (text printed) explaining nature of debt commission’s full powers, settlement being dependent, in part, upon consent of French and Italian Governments.
879

DENMARK

Arrangement Between the United States and Denmark for Reciprocal Exemption From Income Tax on Shipping

Date and number Subject Page
1920 June 16 (156) From the Danish Minister
Memorandum by joint committee of the three Scandinavian treaty commissions (text printed) presenting arguments against taxation of foreign shipping and suggesting that question be dealt with by international conference.
881
[Page CII]1921 Oct. 27 (370) From the Danish Minister
Representations against striking from revenue bill of section providing for reciprocal exemption from taxation of foreign shipping. Request that notes and memorandum be presented to U. S. Congress.
885
Dec. 21 To the Danish Minister
Information that section (text printed) of revenue act providing for reciprocal exemption from taxation of foreign shipping was reinserted in bill as enacted November 23, 1921.
886
1922 May 22 (157) From the Danish Minister
Proposal of exchange of notes to effect agreement for reciprocal exemption of shipowners from foreign taxation; desire that exemption be retroactive to include years 1917–1920.
887
Aug. 9 To the Danish Minister
Necessity for reciprocal declaration by Denmark and Iceland of exemption from taxation of income of U. S. shipowners in those countries.
887
Aug. 18 (236) From the Danish Minister
Understanding that exemption would extend from January 1, 1921, notwithstanding exchange of notes at later date.
888
Oct. 24 (284) From the Danish Minister
Danish declaration exempting U. S. shipowners from income tax in Denmark and Iceland. Request for reciprocal U. S. exemption in accordance with Revenue Act of 1921.
889
Oct. 25 To the Danish Minister
Confirmation of understanding that exemption of shipowners from foreign income tax will extend from January 1, 1921, and assurance of refund if such taxes have been collected.
889
Oct. 28 (290) From the Danish Minister
Affirmation that income of U. S. shipowners has not been subject to taxation in Denmark or Iceland since January 1, 1921, or previously.
890
Dec. 5 To the Danish Minister
U. S. Treasury note (excerpt printed) declaring that Denmark and Iceland satisfy equivalent exemption provision of Section 213 (b) (8) of Revenue Act of 1921, and in case such taxes have been collected since January 1, 1921, they will be proper subject of claim for refund.
890
Dec. 6 (331) From the Danish Minister
Acknowledgment of note effecting agreement relative to exemption of shipowners from double income tax on shipping.
891
[Page CIII]

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Delay in Holding Elections in Fulfillment of the Plan of Evacuation, and the Extension of the Life of the Provisional Government

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Feb. 14 (6) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to report on status of electoral law and all other political matters.
892
Feb. 15 (6) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Completion of electoral law and its final reading before presentation to President for promulgation. Intense political feeling between parties.
(Footnote: Promulgation of electoral law, March 8, 1923.)
892
Apr. 5 (42) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Unnecessary delay in promulgation of electoral law, with consequent retarding of evacuation. Agreement with Commission of Dominicans for short registration period to be followed by general elections. Recommendation to Provisional Government for immediate procuring of material for registration and balloting.
893
Apr. 10 (46) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Selection of Central Electoral Board; its personnel.
894
Apr. 30 (52) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic
Efforts to counteract propaganda spread by certain members of the National and Progressive Parties to the effect that U. S. Government and U. S. sugar companies favor and are financing the Presidential candidate of the National Coalition Party.
894
May 12 (56) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Commission’s agreement to continue Provisional Government in power until December 31, 1923, or if execution of Plan of Evacuation is not completed before January 1, 1924, for such further period as may be necessary.
895
May 17 (57) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Completion of preparations for registration and elections; decision to leave for temporary stay in the United States.
896
May 24 To the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic
Approval of Commissioner’s endeavor to make clear in Dominican Republic the neutral position of the United States in Presidential contest.
897
June 23 (27) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report on progress of registration
897
Aug. 3 (29) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Request for views on Acting Military Governor’s report on increase in smuggling of arms into Dominican Republic and dangers from antagonism against United States; and on Navy Department’s decision to send commander of Special Service Squadron in the Rochester to investigate situation.
897
Aug. 12 (40) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information concerning smuggling of arms into Republic. Belief that situation would not be unfavorably affected if Rochester came as a naval transport.
898
Aug. 16 (41) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Presidential decree calling for elections on November 14.
898
[Page CIV]Sept. 10 (36) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Inquiry whether indications of smuggling of arms continue; authorization, within discretion, to inquire of Provisional Government what preventive measures have been taken.
899
Sept. 11 (48) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Indications of cessation in smuggling of arms; capture of quantity of arms by national police.
899
Sept. 27 (37) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Reported agreement of Dominican Commission and Provisional Government to suspend from office for 10 days prior to elections all rural alcaldes pedañeos and to transfer their powers to local Policia Nacional. Department’s belief that period should be extended to 45 days commencing October 1.
899
Sept. 28 (50) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that there has been no agreement to suspend rural alcaldes pedañeos. Belief of Provisional Government that such suspension would be unwise and dangerous to preservation of order.
900
Sept. 28 (51) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Dominican Commission’s consideration of possibility of abolishing provision in electoral law for registration certificates, in view of impossibility of delivering sufficient number before elections.
900
Oct. 5 (39) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinion that alcaldes pedañeos should be suspended for at least 30 days prior to elections, because of belief that the majority of them are actively working for candidates of National and Progressive Parties. Instructions to consult Provisional President, Minister of Interior, Military Governor, and Colonel Cutts concerning suspension of alcaldes pedañeos and competence of Policia Nacional to preserve order in rural districts during period.
900
Oct. 5 (41) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to advise Commission and Provisional President of U. S. views that fair election cannot be held unless requirement of election law regarding registration is carried out without amendment.
901
Oct. 6 (42) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to advise Department on certain points in connection with electoral boards, after consulting with President and Secretary of Interior.
902
Oct. 8 (53) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Public protest against decision of Central Electoral Board in throwing out entire ticket of Vasquez Alliance nominated in La Vega Province, on ground that duplicate copy of original “acta” was not transmitted.
903
Oct. 10 (54) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Categorical reply to inquiry regarding electoral boards.
903
[Page CV]Oct. 10 (55) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinions of Provisional President, Colonel Cutts, Military Governor, and others that suspension of alcaldes pedañeos from office prior to election would result in trouble, since there are not sufficient police to replace them in preserving order.
904
Oct. 10 (45) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
From Welles: Instruction to request President to induce Central Electoral Board to permit Provincial Assembly of the Alliance in La Vega Province to correct technical error by presentation to Board of required duplicate copy of “acta”.
906
Oct. 10 (56) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Protest of Vasquez and Velasquez (text printed) against Board’s decision to throw out ticket of Vasquez Alliance in La Vega Province on ground of technical error.
907
Oct. 17 (49) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
From Welles: Instructions to present to Commission the view of the United States (text printed) that authorities should abide by decisions of Central Electoral Board or find recourse as provided in article 13 of electoral law.
908
Oct. 20 (63) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Provisional President’s offer to confer with Central Electoral Board and propose solution for case of rejection of Vasquez Alliance in La Vega Province as coming from U. S. Government. Electoral Board’s failure to function following impeachment charges against two nonpolitical members.
909
Oct. 22 (51) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Desire that Minister of Interior be urged to act as substitute on Central Electoral Board and that utmost influence be used to secure resumption of duties by Board. Instructions to express Department’s appreciation of President’s offer and to advise him that it is now too late to intervene in case of rejection of Alliance in La Vega Province and also that United States does not feel warranted in making formal suggestions in case.
910
Nov. 9 (62) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Conferences with Commission and Presidential candidates, resulting in agreement to postpone elections for 46 days and to amend electoral law to correct certain inequalities and abuses, thus necessitating modification of article 2 of the Plan of Evacuation.
911
Nov. 12 (6) To the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
No objection to modification of article 2 of Plan of Evacuation; and gratification over agreement brought about by Commissioner.
913
Nov. 16 (63) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Decree promulgated November 12 postponing elections. Progress in conference with Presidential candidates.
913
Nov. 27 (65) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Conference with Presidential candidates, resulting in agreement as to method of reconstituting electoral boards, even distribution of positions between the parties, etc.
914
[Page CVI]Dec. 12 (66) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Consent by both parties and Commission to extension of term of Provisional Government until replaced by constitutional government, conditional upon selection of a Minister of Interior satisfactory to both parties.
914
Dec. 22 (69) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Reorganization of Executive departments of Provisional Government; Commission’s adoption of amendment to election law, and appointment of new provincial and municipal electoral boards, and other officials.
915
Dec. 27 (70) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Completion of reorganization of Provisional Government by appointment of two secretaries.
916
1924 Jan. 4 (1) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Promulgation of decree containing amendments to electoral law; completion of appointments required by reorganization of provisional and municipal governments; also additional decree announcing dates for electoral period and national election. Personnel of new Central Electoral Board.
917

Arrangement for the Purchase of the Properties of the Santo Domingo Water, Light and Power Company by Dominican Municipalities

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 26 (2) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Assurance by Minister of Interior that Santo Domingo Water, Light and Power Co. will not be dispossessed of property during his term of office; his suggestion that arrangement be made to sell plant or make new contract to assure service of water and light.
918
Mar. 8 (7) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Desire that Provisional Government suspend embargo proceedings against company and make amicable settlement, preferably by Government’s purchase of plant and rights of company.
918
Apr. 12 (47) From the Commissioner in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
For Francis White: Reasons Provisional Government cannot take over company’s rights and property. Proposal that the two municipalities purchase plant by issue of municipal bonds with Government guaranty ad referendum to national Congress.
919
Apr. 16 (14) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Approval of proposal that Provisional Government and company’s representatives make a mutually satisfactory arrangement ad referendum for purchase of company’s properties by municipalities of Santiago and Puerta Plata.
921
June 23 (28) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Approval by both municipalities of contract for settlement of case of Santo Domingo Water, Light and Power Co.
921
[Page CVII]July 12 (875) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Provisional Government’s request for U. S. consent to issue of 5-percent bonds to be delivered to Water, Light and Power Co. Request for instructions.
922
Aug. 29 (46) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Request for advice as to necessary formalities with Provisional Government for negotiating bond issue with bankers, it being necessary that bonds be ready for delivery to mortgage creditor upon completion of valuation of property and repairs and improvement.
922
Aug. 31 (520) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Department’s promise to take necessary action toward granting consent to required increase in Dominican public debt under treaty provisions, as soon as the amount of the required payment of bonds by Dominican Government shall have been determined.
922

ECUADOR

Employment of a Financial Adviser by the Government of Ecuador

Date and number Subject Page
1922 Oct. 24 (22) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Unofficial information that President of Ecuador doubts necessity for employing a financial adviser as authorized by Congress, in view of failure of loan law in Congress. Instructions to report exact situation.
924
Nov. 6 (31) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
President’s reasons for not employing a financial adviser until a loan is obtained.
924
1923 June 9 (65) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
For General Russell: Ecuadoran desire for U. S. approval of 4-year contract with John S. Hord as Financial Adviser to Ecuador. Request for views as to advisability of his leaving uncompleted his task of reconstruction work in Haiti.
925
June 26 (85) From the High Commissioner in Haiti (tel.)
Report of Hord’s intention to leave Haiti, awaiting, however, word from Department before giving notice.
925
June 28 (70) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
For General Russell: Authorization to state to President, when Hord presents his resignation, that Department has no objection to its acceptance.
926
[Page CVIII]

Refusal by the Government of Ecuador To Submit a Dispute With the Guayaquil and Quito Railway to Arbitration as Provided in the Company’s Contract

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Jan. 6 (1) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to inform Government that its suit against Guayaquil and Quito Railway Co. for recovery of 600,000 sucres alleged to have been deposited with Company by Government in December 1909 appears to be contrary to provisions of contract, which calls for settlement of differences between Company and Government by arbitration.
926
Jan. 24 (1) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Government’s contention that contracts with aliens should not give rise to diplomatic settlement except in case of denial of justice and that deposit of 600,000 sucres had no relation to contract for construction of railway. Request for permission to lay case before President of Ecuador and urge advisability of arbitration.
926
Feb. 1 (3) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Authorization to take up with President right of company to resort to arbitration.
927
Feb. 17 (4) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s denial of right of company to present request for arbitration formally through diplomatic channels, especially since Ecuadoran Constitution makes waiver of diplomatic intervention an implicit part of every contract. President’s inability to discuss justice of arbitration because of Constitutional provisions prohibiting him from hindering judicial procedure.
928
Mar. 14 (6) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to renew representations to President, reminding him that Government of Ecuador voluntarily agreed in its contract to settle controversies with company by arbitration, and expressing the hope that suit will be withdrawn.
928
Mar. 23 (5) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
President’s inability to take action because lawyer against company was appointed and instructed by Congress.
929
May 1 (117) From the Minister in Ecuador
Decision of court of Province of Pichincha, April 9, that present case is not subject to arbitration and that court has full jurisdiction. Company’s appeal to Superior Court. Probability case will be prolonged until meeting of Congress in August, when Congress might be persuaded to withdraw suit.
929
July 9 (9) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to inform President that U. S. Government cannot admit that action taken by Government of Ecuador sets precedent for future and that United States must reserve all rights in case of adverse decision.
929
July 13 (136) From the Minister in Ecuador
Representations presented to President, July 11. President’s reply, July 12, maintaining position that suit is in no way a violation of contract as it is foreign to the provisions thereof.
930
[Page CIX]Nov. 15 (210) From the Minister in Ecuador
Decision of Superior Court, October 20, that case is related to contracts of railway company with Government and that arbitral court is only competent judge. Reference of case to Supreme Court for final decision.
931

Objections by the United States to the Hypothecation of Ecuadoran Revenues Already Pledged to the Service of the Guayaquil and Quito Railway Bonds

Date and number Subject Page
1922 July 11 (12) From the Minister in Ecuador
Report on status of Ecuador’s debt; failure of negotiations between Ecuador and Guayaquil and Quito Railway Co. for waiving of unpaid sinking fund and refunding of unpaid interest; railway’s efforts to secure appointment of a financial adviser, to influence exchange, and to increase its own income.
931
1923 Oct. 23 From the Consul General at London (tel.)
Approval by Congress of two loan contracts with Ethel-burga Syndicate, one a government loan and the other a conversion loan, both guaranteed by first mortgage on customs.
933
Oct. 24 (14) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Recommendation that Department refuse to approve loan, in view of fact that under loan contract it will be possible for Government as bondholder to foreclose and seize railway and because loan contract makes no provision for payment of debt of Association of Agriculturists to Mercantile Bank, as previously promised by President.
933
Oct. 26 (15) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Letter for President (text printed) inquiring what measures Government proposes to take in conformity with President’s assurances, February 5, 1922, that if Government obtained a foreign loan it would immediately pay half of the debt to the Mercantile Bank.
933
Oct. 29 (15) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Presentation of letter to President, October 27, and President’s reply on same date (text printed) merely acknowledging letter.
934
Nov. 5 (16) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to request definite answer to letter of October 27 inquiring what measures Ecuador proposes to take regarding debt to Mercantile Bank.
934
Nov. 6 (17) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to report as to correctness of information that loan contract gives new bonds priority and exclusive claim to customs receipts, in violation of railway contract of 1908; and that Government apparently intends to obtain control of railway bonds and then to foreclose as bondholder and seize railway. Instructions also to make such representations as deemed necessary to protect U. S. rights.
934
[Page CX]Nov. 9 (16) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Confirmation of Department’s information regarding new loan contract. Possibility that contract may not be signed.
935
Nov. 30 (18) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
President’s statement that present loan is intended merely to consolidate foreign debt and to pay off domestic debt; his assurance that Government recognizes Mercantile Bank debt and that it will be paid when the amount has been determined by the Association of Agriculturists and the bank by arbitration or lawsuit.
936
Dec. 1 (19) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Decision not to make representations regarding rights of U. S. bondholders unless further instructed, in view of possibility that loan will not be concluded.
936
Dec. 6 (18) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions not to make representations unless it seems probable that loan contract will be signed.
936
Dec. 7 (19) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to discuss loan contract with President immediately and, unless assured that loan contract will not be signed, to make representations to protect American rights.
937
Dec. 13 (20) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Note verbale sent to President in sense of Department’s telegram no. 17, November 6, in view of information that Government was proceeding with negotiations to sign final contract in London. President’s reply evading direct answer but giving assurance that Government will always respect and comply with its contracts.
937
Dec. 17 (383) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Note verbale for Foreign Office (text printed) making representations against proposed Ecuadoran loan contract with British syndicate and giving notice that Guayaquil and Quito Railway Co. disputes right of Ecuador to pledge customs receipts in violation of company’s rights.
938
Dec. 17 (21) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to address note to President acknowledging his communication and informing him of U. S. satisfaction at his assurances concerning contracts; also to indicate, if it is learned definitely that contract is to be signed, that U. S. Government will not view with favor the floating of such a loan in the United States.
938
1924 Jan. 24 (35) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Foreign Office note, January 22, 1924 (text printed) stating that British syndicate is acting in friendly manner and fully recognizes rights of bondholders under contract of 1908, and that portion of new issue is appropriated to liquidation of external debt of Ecuador.
939
[Page CXI]Feb. 25 (3) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information that President has authorized signing of loan contract; opposition of President-elect.
(Footnote: Failure of Ecuador and syndicate to conclude contract.)
940

Efforts To Liquidate the Debts of the Cacao Growers Association

Date and number Subject Page
1923 July 30 To the Minister in Ecuador
Instruction to render all appropriate assistance to Jordan Herbert Stabler, who is proceeding to Ecuador in interest of Mercantile Bank of the Americas in connection with matter pending between the bank and the Association of Agriculturists.
940
Sept. 11 (12) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information of a bill introduced in Ecuadoran Senate August 30 reducing 3-sucre tax on cacao to 1 sucre. Instructions to inform Government that Department relies on President’s assurances of February 5, 1922, that 3-sucre tax will be continued until Mercantile Bank debt has been canceled.
940
Sept. 30 (Quarterly Report 23) From the Minister in Ecuador
Stabler’s acceptance in name of bank of a reduction of the tax to 2 sucres; and the amendment of the bill in the Chamber of Deputies placing the tax at 2 sucres and providing for the complete liquidation of the Association of Agriculturists and the assumption of the administration of the debt by the Government.
941
Dec. 1 (236) From the Minister in Ecuador
Detailed report on interview with President, in which President gave assurance that Mercantile Bank debt would be paid once the amount had been determined between the bank and the association by arbitration or lawsuit.
942

ESTONIA

Extradition Treaty Between the United States and Estonia

Date and number Subject Page
1923 Nov. 8 Treaty between the United States of America and Estonia
For the extradition of fugitives from justice.
945
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