Mr. Tillman to Mr. Olney.

No. 30.]

Sir: I had the honor in my dispatch No. 29,1 dated September 1, but which should have been dated August 31, to inform you of the flight of the minister of foreign relations and the abdication of the other cabinet officers, and that the municipal government was the only source of order and that a friend of Alfaro was civil and military chief.

Governor Alfaro entered the city on the 1st of this month with his army, and everything has been quiet. His course has been moderate and magnanimous. He yesterday notified General Savasti that he was at liberty to return to his own home, with the assurance that he should not be molested, but there is a disposition on the part of all parties, either from ignorance or prejudice, to attribute the act even of a half-drunken soldier to the Government in power. I hand you herewith a letter, copy of original and translation, from Louis F. Carbo, minister of foreign relations under Alfaro’s regime, addressed to me, and my reply to the same.

I have to-day made a personal call upon General Alfaro, and found him easy and affable, having the appearance of a man of decided character. He impresses me as a man who is moved by the highest motives. He took occasion to express to me his admiration for the real republican character of the United States Government. I informed him that I had from time to time informed my Government as to the progress of events in this country.

I am, etc.,

James D. Tillman
.
[Inclosure in No. 30—Translation.]

Mr. Carbo to Mr. Tillman.

Most Excellent Señor: On the 5th of August of the present year the people of Guayaquil proclaimed Gen. Eloy Alfaro jefe supremo of the Republic of Ecuador and general in chief of the army. This popular proclamation was immediately seconded by all the provinces of the coast and by some of the interior of the Republic. As soon as General Alfaro arrived from abroad he informed his cabinet in this city, as it appears in the decrees and proclamations, which your excellency will see in the “official record,” copies of which I have the pleasure of sending you with this note. The resistance which the Government, not recognized in the proceedings of the coast, offered to the expressed will of the country compelled the supreme chief to open a campaign against the interior of the Republic, but not without having first exhausted conciliatory efforts with commissioners of peace, whom he sent to Quito and Cuenca without results, on account of the obstinacy of those who attempted to exalt themselves above the national will, clearly and honestly manifested in the public press and in the military camps.

It was therefore necessary for the government of Guayas to appeal to arms to reduce to submission those who, working on the religious sentiment of the country, were engaged in sustaining a shadow of government, [Page 248]which was, in fact, but a mockery, and leaves behind it sad records. The victories obtained by our valorous army in the center and south of the Republic, the defection of the troops who sustained in Quito the expiring Government, the flight of some of the members of the cabinet, and the seeking of asylums by others in foreign legations, the proclamations, and the entry of our army into the capital, where the jefe supremo will be when this note reaches you, are circumstances more than sufficient to convince you that the Government which I represent, whose jurisdiction extends over the whole Republic, is in very truth the national Government, while the faction of fugitives who wander toward the north and will soon disappear no longer deserve to be taken into account. In the official record, to which I have referred your excellency, you will be able to inform yourself as to the policies and tendencies of this Government, as well as its actual residence in this city, as represented by the council of ministers charged with the executive power. The undersigned, being honored with the presidency of the council, has the satisfaction to assure your excellency that the new Government of Ecuador proposes to bind still further, if possible, the friendly relations of your country and ours.

Please accept, etc.,

Louis F. Carbo
.
[Inclosure 2 in No. 30.]

Mr. Tillman to Mr. Carbo.

Sir: I had the honor of receiving yesterday your communication of August 29, 1895. The narration of political events and military movements for the past three months is in accord with my own observation and information, and the conduct of General Alfaro since his entrance to the capital has been characterized by moderation and magnanimity. All the public offices of national rank have been abdicated by those to whom three months ago I presented my letter of credence from the President of the United States. I unite with you in the desire to strengthen still more, if possible, the friendly relations which have existed between Ecuador and the United States of America. I have informed my Government from time to time of the progress of events and General Alfaro’s movements, and will forward to Consul-General Dillard by your agent another dispatch to be mailed to the Secretary of State, from whom I must hear before I can further take action in my character as minister to Ecuador.

I am, etc.,

James D. Tillman
.