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List of the papers with an analysis of their contents

argentine republic.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pitkin (telegram). 1891. Jan. 5 Tax on foreign life-insurance companies doing business in the Argentine Republic: Instructions to protest against levying exceptionally large tax. 1
88 Same to same Jan. 8 Same subject: Confirms the above telegram and incloses, quoting from it, a letter dated December 22, 1890, from the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York. 1
94 Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine Feb. 5 Same subject: Incloses copies of the protests from the legation. 2
96 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pitkin Feb. 13 Port charges on vessels putting into Buenos Ayres in distress: Transmits the complaint of the Natioual Board of Marine Underwriters and instructs to investigate and remedy. 4
100 Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine Feb. 23 Political condition: Incloses the proclamation declaring the state of siege and an account of the attempt on ex-President Roca’s life. Reports the suspension of two newspapers and his visit of congratulations to Gen. Roca. 5
102 Same to same Feb. 26 Tax on foreign life-insurance companies: Incloses reply of the foreign office, placing the remedy in the federal supreme court, and announces that by decree, inclosed, the tax has been in part removed, and that a proposition has been made to the companies to place them, under certain conditions, on the same footing as domestic companies. 7
111 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pitkin Mar. 30 Same subject: Acknowledges, with approval, Mr. Pitkin’s No. 94. 9
124 Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine May 13 Address of the President of the Confederation to the Argentine Congress: Reports its salient statements. 9
129 Same to same May 27 Port charges on vessels in distress: Transmits verbal denial that they are levied and assurance that they will be refunded if proved to have been collected. 10
137 Same to same June 17 Tax on life-insurance companies: Incloses copy of the executive decree promulgating conditions on which the Equitable Life Assurance Society is assimilated to the domestic companies, and letter of thanks from the manager of said society. 11
141 Same to same July 7 Port charges on vessels in distress: Transmits letter of minister of Hacienda accompanying report of customs official, denying that they are collected except in cases of regular entry. 12

austria-hungary.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
125 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine 1890. Dec. 21 Passport application of Mr. Rudolph Nejedly, born in New York of a naturalized citizen who came back to live in Europe one year after obtaining naturalization; Explains that he has no intention of returning to the United States, and submits the course adopted by the legation in similar cases, viz, refusal of the passport. 14
[Page XLIV]110 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Grant 1891. Feb. 26 Same subject: Discusses the case above presented and declines to direct the issuance of the passport. 15
155 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine May 25 Assisted immigration: Incloses copy of his note to the foreign office in the case of the sending to New York of Nikolaus Bader, a criminal, by the authorities of Stauzach. 16
124 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Grant June 16 Same subject: Approves his note above mentioned. 17
168 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine July 15 Same subject: Transmits and comments upon the reply of the foreign office, attempting to show that Bader’s case did not come within the categories prohibited by the immigration laws. 17
173 Same to same July 27 Citizenship of Mr. Mazel, born in Washington, D. C., while his father was minister of the Netherlands to the United States, his mother being an American citizen: Will it be sufficient for him to return to the United States and renounce his allegiance to the Queen of the Netherlands to be admitted a citizen of the United States? 19
180 Same to same Aug. 1 Free port of Trieste is to be by act of the Reichsrath, divested after July 1 of the franchise conferred in 1719 by Karl VI. 20
133 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Grant Aug. 6 Assisted immigration: Instructions to address a note to the foreign office saying that Bader having been returned, the incident is terminated. 20
134 Same to same Aug. 10 Citizenship of Mr. Mazel: Expresses the opinion that he being the son of a foreign diplomatic officer comes under the statute governing the naturalization of aliens. 21
183 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine Aug. 18 Military service of Alfred Janowitz, a naturalized citizen: Relates his interview with Mr. Janowitz, to whom he promised protection if molested by the military authorities, and reports his subsequent successful intervention in his behalf. Incloses correspondence with Mr. Janowitz and the foreign office. 21
184 Same to same Aug. 20 Military service of Julius Kranz, a naturalized citizen: Reports that after being deprived of his passport and ordered to appear before the board of enrollment he was, through the interference of the legation, relieved of all liability to military duty and allowed to visit his parents. Incloses correspondence in the case. 26
188 Same to same Sept. 11 Assisted immigration: Incloses a copy of his note to the foreign office in the case of Nikolaus Bader and of the reply thereto. 29
149 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Grant Oct. 5 Same subject: Approves the note transmitted in the above. 30
213 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine Dec. 5 Hog products: Incloses a copy of the ordinance permitting the importation of such products as are accompanied with certificates of inspection, and of the accompanying note from the foreign office; presents his congratulations. 31

belgium.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
134 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Terrell 1891. May 11 Dressed beef imported info Belgium: Incloses, with instructions to make appropriate representations, a letter from the honorable Secretary of Agriculture protesting against the requirements of the Belgian Government that carcasses should be imported with the lungs attached. 33
225 Mr. Terrell to Mr. Blaine. Sept. 10 Same subject: Reports that the foreign office replies that the requirements complained of, being provided for by law, can not be modified by the Government, but that as a token of good will, the quarantine against stock has been further reduced to three days; incloses correspondence, decree relating to quarantine, and copy of the law governing the importation of carcasses. 34
[Page XLV]160 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Terrell Oct. 1 Same subject: Incloses, with instructions to present the matter to the Belgian Government, a letter from the Secretary of Agriculture, complaining that the requirements of the law constitute a discrimination against the products and a reflection on the inspection law of the United States. 37
231 Mr. Terrell to Mr. Blaine Oct. 31 Same subject: Explains that the law is a sanitary measure and is indiscriminately applied to importations from all countries; says that he has suggested an amendment allowing the suspension of its provisions in regard to countries enforcing satisfactory inspection of their meat exports. Incloses a copy of his note to the foreign office. 38

brazil.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
31 Mr. Conger to Mr. Blaine 1891 Mar. 6 Political situation: Reports the adoption of the constitution and the election of the President and Vice-President; no invitation to the inauguration was issued to the diplomatic corps, and he did not attend. 40
62 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Conger June 23 Tax levied by the state of Amazonas on merchandise in transit to the United States: Incloses a letter from Charles Ahrenfeldt & Son, of New York, complaining that they have to pay a tax of 5 per cent on rubber shipped to them from Peru; instructs the minister to make proper representations against the practice if it is found to exist. 40
90 Mr. Conger to Mr. Blaine July 18 Political situation: Briefly reports the organization of the several states of Brazil. 41
101 Same to same July 27 Tax levied by the state of Amazonas: Replies to No. 62 and says he has no official knowledge of the facts complained of, but has written to the consular agent at Manaos. The minister from Peru has informed him that similar complaints have been made by his countrymen and that the tax has been refunded; says that the levying of the tax is not permissible under the constitution of Brazil. 41
Same to same Nov. 4 Political situation: Announces that the president has dissolved congress and declared martial law. 42
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Conger (telegram). Nov. 9 Same subject: Instructions to present to the Brazilian President the solicitude of the United States and counsel in favor of wise moderation. 42
Mr. Conger to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Nov. 23 Same subject: Announces the resignation of President Deodora and the peaceful installation of Vice-President Peixoto. 42

correspondence with the legation of brazil at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Blaine to Senhor Men-donça. 1890. Nov. 3 Reciprocity: Calls attention to section 3 of the tariff law and invites the presentation of an agreement between the two Governments, the basis and terms of which are indicated to remain in force so long as no intention is declared to consider it at an end. 43
Senhor Mendonça to Mr. Blaine. 1891. Jan. 31 Same subject: Transmits schedules of articles, the products or manufactures of the United States, to be admitted into Brazil free or with a reduction of duty of 25 per cent, in due reciprocity; declares that no increase in the export tax shall be made on articles admitted free of duty into the United States; notice of termination of the agreement to be given at least three months in advance, and such termination to take place on the first day of January or of July. 44
[Page XLVI] Mr. Blaine to Senhor Mendonça. Jan. 31 Same subject: Acknowledges the above communication and conveys the formal acceptation of its terms. 46
Feb. 5 Same subject: Proclamation of the President promulgating the reciprocity agreement with the United States of Brazil. 47
Mr. Blaine to the President Feb. 7 Same subject: Submits tables showing the share of the United States in the importation of, and rates of duty levied on, articles included in the two categories established by the agreement with Brazil. 49
Senhor Mendonça to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 10 Message of friendship of the Brazilian Congress to the Congress of the United States transmitted. 50
Mr. Blaine to Senhor Mendonça. Mar. 17 Same subject: Acknowledges the receipt of the above, and returns expressions of friendship. 51
Senhor Chermont to Senhor Mendonça. Nov. 15 Political situation: Instructs the Brazilian minister at Washington to transmit to the President the grateful feelings with which his interest in the institutions of Brazil and his advice for their preservation have been received. 52

central america.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
238 Mr. Kimberly to Mr. Blaine. 1891. Jan. 24 Seizure of arms on the Colima by the Government of Guatemala: Reports his interview with the minister of foreign affairs, who contended that the late U. S. minister, Mr. Mizner, neglected to carry out the arrangements agreed upon for reparation; says that he fixed upon the 26th instant for the date of their execution. Incloses his letter to Capt. Johnston informing the said captain of the facts. 53
239 Same to same Jan. 26 Telegraphic communications: Recommends that steps be taken to maintain and facilitate the same between the United States and Central America. 54
243 Same to same Jan. 31 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Incloses the report, by Capt. Johnston, of the reparation made at San José on the 29th of January by the commandant of the port. 54
246 Same to same. Feb. 4 Same subject: Reports his refusal of the request made by the acting Minister of Foreign Affairs that he change the word “expiation” to “explanation” in his letter of instructions to Capt. Johnston. 55
27 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pacheco. Feb. 13 Rumors of war in Central America: instructs him to request a definite assurance that the reported attack by Guatemala and Honduras on Salvador is not contemplated, and deprecates war among the Central American Republics. 56
32 Same to same Feb. 20 Telegraphic communications: Instructs him to carry out the suggestion made in No. 239 (supra) for the preservation of the same between the United States and Central America in time of war. 57
253 Mr. Kimberly to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 23 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a letter from the United States consul at Tegucigalpa, Honduras, reporting various instances of delay of transmission and requesting the legation’s intervention. 58
35 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pacheco. Feb. 28 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Reviews Mr. Kimberly’s action in the matter of reparation, and, referring to previous instructions, points to the grave omission of reparation due to the United States for the seizure, arid instructs him to bring the subject to the attention of the Government of Guatemala. 59
38 Same to same Mar. 2 Same subject: Refers to Mr. Kimberly’s No. 246 and to the instructions above, and the word “expiation” not being adapted to the requirements of the case; says that the letter of instructions to Capt. Johnston should be expunged or at least amended. 61
[Page XLVII]10 Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 11 Rumors of war in Central America. They are denied by the minister of foreign affairs and by the President of Guatemala; incloses extract of the President’s message bearing upon this point and the Barrundia incident; and an editorial of the Guatemalteco. 62
44 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pacheco Mar. 16 Telegraphic communications between Central America and the United States. Incloses further complaint about their bad condition from the United States consul at Tegucigalpa, and expresses the hope that a remedy will soon be applied. 64
28 Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine June 9 Same subject: Reports that he has written a letter to the minister of foreign affairs of Salvador in accordance with instructions Nos. 32 and 44. 65
42 Same to same July 22 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Incloses notes exchanged with the minister of foreign affairs, who insists that the reparation made by Col. Toriello was accepted by the United States charge d’affaires as complete. 66
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco (telegram). Aug. 10 Right of asylum: Confiscation of the steamship City of Panama. Advises Mr. Pacheco of the intelligence received from the minister of foreign affairs of Salvador of the refusal of the captain of the steamer to surrender a passenger and of the subsequent sentence of confiscation of the vessel and instructs him to protest against any arbitrary action. 68
Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 10 Same subject: Reports the facts stated in the above telegram and announces that the City of Panama was declared confiscated on arrival at Libertad. 68
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco (telegram). Aug. 13 Same subject: Confirms preceding telegraphic instruction and calls for a full report. 68
13 Same to same Aug. 13 Same subject: Incloses telegram of United States consul at San Salvador and a letter from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company referring to the case. 69
Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 14 Same subject: Reports the safe arrival of the City of Panama at San Jose de Guatemala, where the authorities Avill deliver clearance papers; protest will be telegraphed at once to Salvador. 70
53 Same to same Aug. 18 Same subject: Incloses a copy of his protest telegraphed to minister of foreign affairs of Salvador. 70
54 Same to same Aug. 19 Same subject: Incloses detailed report of Capt. White of the City of Panama to the company’s general agent at Panama, with its inclosures; explains that telegraphic communications with Salvadorbeing interrupted, he has not yet received any answer to his protest. 70
21 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco. Aug. 22 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Reviews the action taken by the chargé d’ affaires and by himself, and expresses regret that it should have led to the misconception on the part of the Guatemalan Government of the true purport of reparation expected; instructs him to advise that Government that the question of indemnity is reserved for future consideration. 74
55 M. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine. Aug. 26 Right of asylum: Confiscation of steamship City of Panama: incloses copies of two notes from the minister of foreign affairs of Guatemala relating to the confiscation, and his reply, maintaining the right of Capt. White to refuse the surrender of a political offender. 76
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco (telegram). Aug. 28 Same subject: Instructs him to secure assurance that the City of Panama will not be detained on her return trip to Salvador, and to enter strong protest against any contemplated seizure of the ship. 79
58 Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine Aug. 31 Same subject: Incloses copy of his telegram to the foreign office of Guatemala in compliance with the above instructions. 79
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 3 Same subject: The City of Panama will not be detained longer than permitted under the contract, and indemnity will be paid if unlawful detention be ordered; the confiscation proceedings will be continued. 80
[Page XLVIII] Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco (telegram). Sept. 4 Same subject: What is the length of time adverted to in contract, and what is the meaning of indemnity if no longer detention is to take place? 80
Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine Sept. 9 Same subject: The offer of the Salvador Government was evidently intended to apply to any case of unjust and exceptional detention. 80
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco (telegram.) Sept. 11 Eight of asylum: Confiscation of steamship City of Panama; asks what is the penalty on a vessel leaving port of Salvador without clearance papers. 81
Same to same (telegram) Sept, 14 Same subject: Repeats the above instruction. 81
Mr. Pacheco to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 15 Same subject: Reply to the above. 81
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 17 Same subject: No answer yet received as to time during which the steamer can be detained under the contract. 81
73 Same to same Sept. 29 Seizure of arms on Colima: Instructions No. 21 have been complied with. 82
39 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pacheco Oct. 19 War rumors in Central America: In view of, instructs him to use his good offices for the maintenance of peace and the observance of arbitration principles 82

correspondence with the legation of salvador at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Señor Guirola to Mr. Blaine 1891. Feb. 3 War rumors in Central America: Adverts to preparations of Guatemala, said to be conducted in New York, and beseeches the friendly offices of the United States; newspaper extracts inclosed. 83
Mr. Blaine to Señor Guirola Feb. 9 Same subject: In reply to the above, remarks that allegations should be first supported by affidavits, 85
Señor Guirola to Mr. Blaine Feb. 10 Same subject: Affirms that Guatemala is preparing for war, and repeats his request of February 3. 86
Mr. Blaine to Señor Guirola Feb. 18 Same subject: The United States will do all in its power to avert a conflict. 87
Same to same. Feb. 27 Same subject: The collector of customs at New York has received instructions to prevent the violation of neutrality laws. 88
Same to same Apr. 23 Same subject: Upon investigation, no preparations to disturb the peace in Central America have been found to be carried on in New York. 88
Señor Galindo to Mr. Blaine (telegram.) Aug. 8 Right of asylum: Denounces as an infringement of international law the refusal on the part of the steam ship City of Panama to surrender a passenger. 88
Same to same Aug. 9 Same subject: The steamship City of Panama declared confiscated. 88
Mr. Wharton to Señor Galindo Aug. 13 Same subject: Acknowledges the above telegrams and announces protest against any arbitrary action. 89

chile.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
88 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine 1890. Aug. 15 Political situation: Reports differences between the executive and legislative branches of the Chilean Government, and announces the appointment of a new cabinet, by which harmony has been restored. 90
100 Same to same Oct. 17 Same subject: The cabinet formed in August resigned and a new one selected among members of the minority favorable to the President, who summarily closed the session of Congress. 91
Same to same (telegram) 1891. Jan. 12 Revolution: Reports the revolt of six war vessels: the army seems to remain loyal and public order is maintained by the Government. 91
[Page XLIX]120 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Jan. 12 Same subject: Reports the succession of circumstances which led to the struggle, its actual status, and the preparations and operations carried on by both sides. 92
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 17 Same subject: Blockade of Chilean ports by revolted fleet reported; United States consuls have been advised by him to protest. 93
122 Same to same Jan. 17 Same subject: Confirms the above; the representatives of Germany, England, and France have also agreed to have protests made by the respective consuls. 93
123 Same to same Jan. 19 Same subject: Proclamation of President Balmaceda inclosed; the Congressional forces have landed in Coquimbo, which they hold; the army is still loyal and rapidly increasing. 94
129 Same to same Feb. 13 Same subject: Recapture of Coquimbo by the Government forces reported; the army is rapidly increasing, and, with the exception of repulsed attempts to land on the part of the Congressionalists, the peace has not been disturbed. 104
135 Same to same Feb. 23 Same subject: Arrival at Talcahuano of U. S. S. Pensacola with Admiral McCann. 105
136 Same to same Mar. 4 Same subject: Capture of Iquique by the Congressionalists reported; the United States consulate building and property destroyed in the fight. 105
Same to same (telegram) Mar. 8 Neutrality of the United States: Use of a war vessel of the United States requested by the Chilean Government for the transportation to Montevideo of bar silver destined to payment of interest on the national debt. 105
138 Same to same Mar. 9 Political situation: The Liberal or Government party nominated for President Señor Vicuña, whose election is expected. 106
143 Same to same Mar. 17 Revolution: Battle near Iquique gained by the revolutionists, who have control of the province of Tarapaca; the sympathies of English residents on the side of the revolutionists, to whom they gave pecuniary assistance. 106
144 Same to same Mar. 17 Political: Changes in the cabinet reported 107
86 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan Mar. 23 Revolution: War vessels of the United States which have been or will be sent to Chilean waters. 107
147 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Mar. 31 Same subject: Antofagasta abandoned by the Government troops; elections took place without disturbance in all the provinces, except that of Tarapaca. 108
148 Same to same Apr. 1 Neutrality of the United States: A reply to his telegram of the 8th of March (supra) requested. 108
Same to same (telegram) Apr. 6 Revolution: Closing to commerce of certain ports by the Chilean Government announced. 108
151 Same to same Apr. 6 Same subject: Confirms the preceding telegram and incloses copy of the blockade decree. 109
90 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan Apr. 14 Same subject: The right of considering cases arising under the blockade decree is reserved. 109
152 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Apr. 14 Same subject: German and British legations have strongly protested against the closing of Congressionalist ports, and a German fleet is on its way to oppose its enforcement. He has not joined them, but received assurances that American vessels will not be molested. 110
Same to same (telegram) Apr. 21 Neutrality of the United States: Purchase of United States war vessel is earnestly desired by the Chilean Government; previous advice confirmed. 110
153 Same to same Apr. 21 Revolution: One English and one German steamer detained at Coronel; threats of British minister to release his vessel by force. 110
154 Same to same Apr. 23 Same subject: A German fleet will be sent by the Imperial Government to Chilean waters from China; this measure is not looked upon favorably by Chileans. 111
Same to same (telegram) Apr. 24 Mediation: Asks whether he can act with Brazilian and French representatives toward, restoration of peace. 111
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Apr. 25 Same subject: Grants the permission requested in the preceding telegram. 111
[Page L]157 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Apr. 27 Same subject: Exports that his efforts as mediator will be well received, and that he has had preliminary conferences with both parties. 111
96 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan Apr. 28 Same subject: Confirms telegram of April 25 112
159 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine May 2 Speech of President Balmaceda at the opening of the new Congress. 112
Same to same (telegram). May 4 Mediation: The good offices of the United States, Brazil, and France accepted by both parties; those of Germany and Great Britain declined. 120
160 Same to same. May 4 Same subject: A committee of seven duly authorized by the revolutionists meet at the United States legation. 120
98 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan May 6 Cable of the Central and South American Telegraph Co. Instructions to request special facilities for its repair. Letter of the president of the company inclosed. 120
99 Same to same. May 7 Mediation: Confirms the telegram of May 4 121
Mr. McCreery to Mr. Blaine (telegram). May 8 Steamer Itata, the property of the South American Steamship Company taken by force and impressed in the service of the revolutionary party. 122
161 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine May 8 Mediation and neutrality: Failure of negotiations for peace and presence of the Itata in a port of California with munitions of war for the revolutionary squadron reported. 112
162 Same to same May 13 War vessels of the United States: Movements reported. 122
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). May 14 Mediation: Instructions to protect envoys of the revolutionary party who may come within President Balmaceda’s jurisdiction under offer of mediation. 123
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). May 16 Same subject: Explains and denies report of threats to the envoys; they have been given every facility to leave the country. 123
164 Same to same May 18 Same subject:’ Reports the initiation and progress of negotiations for peace, and their abrupt termination in consequence of an attempt on the lives of members of the cabinet, and the mediators’ intervention in behalf of the envoys’ safety which that event had placed in jeopardy.
Inclosures: Safe conduct for the envoys; acceptance of good offices by the same; bases of negotiations submitted by the same; letter of the minister of foreign affairs to the mediators; reply of Mr. Egan, letter of the mediators to the envoys, and to the minister of foreign affairs in regard to termination of negotiations and of safe conduct.
123
166 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine May 23 Political situation: Reports a change of cabinet, brought about by personal differences among members of the former cabinet. 131
106 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan. May 28 Neutrality: Requests explanations regarding a rumor that Mr. Egan has advised the Chilean Government to issue letters of marque; incloses a letter from Peru reporting the rumor. 131
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan. June 1 Mediation: Instructions to ascertain how the tender of good offices by the United States would be received. 131
Same to same (telegram) June 1 Revolution: A condensed statement by wire and full report by mail of the situation requested. 132
Same to same (telegram) June 1 Neutrality: The Itata and her cargo of arms are expected to be shortly returned to the custody of the courts of the United States. 132
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). June 3 Revolution: Superiority in forces and resources of the Government. 132
170 Same to same June 3 Neutrality: The telegram of June 1 acknowledged. 132
171 Same to same June 3 Revolution: Resources, forces, and territory under the control of each of the parties stated at length; incidents of warfare related; rumors of cruelty on either side denied. 133
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). June 9 Mediation: Peace propositions would be entertained by the Government, but the revolutionists are averse to making any. 135
172 Same to same June 9 Same subject: Incloses correspondence between the legation and Admiral McCann, U. S. Navy, relating to restoration of peace. 135
[Page LI] Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). June 17 Telegraph line on land: Instructions to assist the Central and South American Telegraph Co. in securing fair consideration of their application for a line to the Argentine frontier, in view of negotiations by English companies to purchase the only line now existing. 138
111 Same to same June 18 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a letter written to the Department by the president of the Central and South American Telegraph Co. 138
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). June 25 Same subject: The company refusing to open direct communication with Valparaiso, can not expect favors of the Chilean Government. 139
174 Same to same June 25 Same subject: Gives the additional reason that the application is believed to be a move for the depreciation of the land-line stock. 139
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). June 26 Mediation: Information from the naval officers confirms the impression that the insurgents, contrary to Mr. Egan’s report, would accept the good offices of the United States, and he is instructed to ascertain whether the Government would likewise accept the same. 140
175 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine June 27 Same subject: Incloses correspondence toward restoration of peace passed between the Junta and Rear-Admiral McCann, of the U. S. Navy, accompanying it with a denial that it was carried at his request, and a statement that mediation as present can not be considered. 140
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). June 30 Cable of the Central and South American Telegraph Co.: The company are prevented from operating it between Iquique and Valparaiso, and would open direct connection between the latter place and Peru but fear the officials at Iquique would then cut it. 144
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 2 Same subject: Recommends that the company accept the offer of Chilean Government to pay expenses and guarantee against damages to the cable, in the opening of direct, communication with Valparaiso. 144
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 3 Neutrality: War vessel desired by Chilean Government. The Navy Department has none for sale. 144
115 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan July 9 Revolution: Closing of certain ports to commerce. In view of the assurance that American vessels will not be molested, no instruction in that respect seems necessary. 144
179 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine July 10 Mediation: Insists upon the correctness of his views regarding difficulties in the way of restoration of peace as presented in Nos. 172 and 175. 145
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). July 14 Cable of the Central and South American Telegraph Co. will be connected in the open sea on the 20th of July. 145
180 Mr. Egan to Mr. Wharton July 16 Same subject: Acknowledges the receipt of the above telegram. 145
181 Same to same July 16 Revolution: Cruelties alleged against both sides are grossly exaggerated; instances given. 146
120 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan July 21 Neutrality: Explains for what reasons the envoys of the Junta now in Washington could not be recognized by the Government of the United States. 146
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 25 Clearance to vessels will be granted by Chilean Government only under condition that respective ministers will sign agreement to have their vessels released by force if compelled to enter insurgent ports; asks if he can give the required assurance, as the representatives of Great Britain, Germany, and France have done. 147
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). July 25 Same subject: Declines permission requested in the above telegram, and says the United States will always take proper steps to protect vessels flying its flag. 147
182 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine July 25 Same subject: Guaranty subscribed by the British minister inclosed. 147
183 Same to same July 28 Same subject: Bar silver which the Department declined to allow to be carried to Montevideo on a United States war vessel has been placed on board the British war ship Espiégle, to the destination of England. 148
[Page LII]184 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine July 29 Political: Election of Señor Claudio Vicuña to succeed President Balmaceda. 149
185 Same to same July 30 Neutrality: Attacks on Mr. Egan for alleged nonobservance of neutrality, presented in Mr. Wharton’s No. 106, are denied and refuted. 149
188 Same to same Aug. 3 Same subject: Alleged partiality of British navy to the insurgents’ cause. Transmits instances asserted by the Chilean Government, and incloses article from la Nation 150
189 Same to same Aug. 5 Telegrams received by way of Europe are frequently unintelligible; recommends the using of the Central and South American Co.’s cable. 151
191 Same to same Aug. 8 Outrage on Mr. Herbert C. Stevenson, a United States citizen, by the intendante of Concepcion: Regret has been expressed and an indemnity of $2,000 satisfactory to him, paid Mr. Stevenson. Letter of regret inclosed. 151
192 Same to same Aug. 19 Revolution: Attack on the South by the insurgents anticipated; movements in sympathy with them repressed with barbarity. 152
193 Same to same Aug. 20 Asylum afforded to two members of the revolutionary party. On hearing that threats had been informally made to search his and other legations on that account, he energetically protests. 153
194 Same to same Aug. 24 Revolution: Rout of the Government forces at Concon, near Valparaiso, and ensuing demoralization of the Balmaceda party; measures suggested by Mr. Egan to avert the sacking of Valparaiso, which, however, was not attacked by the victors. 153
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 27 Same subject: Another victory of the revolutionists reported and a decisive battle expected; communications between Valparaiso and the capital cut off; asks to be informed by the Department of any news obtained. 154
Mr. McCreery to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 28 Same subject: Defeat of the Government troops; Valparaiso, surrendered to foreign naval commanders for preservation of order, is being entered by the revolutionists. 155
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram), Aug. 28 Same subject: Communicates information contained in the above. 155
Mr. McCreery to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 30 Same subject: Plight of Balmaceda; representative of the Junta proceeding to Santiago to assume control in its name. 155
195 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Aug. 31 Same subject: Resignation of Balmaceda induced by the American and French legations; Gen. Baquedano placed in charge of the city; scenes of disorder and pillage; sacking of Balmaceda’s partisans’ property; all legations except that of Great Britain sheltering large numbers of refugees. 155
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). Sept. 1 Same subject: Calls for a full report of the situation. 159
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 1 Same subject: Revolutionists have organized the Government; asks whether he may recognize it: all tranquil. 159
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). Sept. 4 Same subject: Instructions to recognize the new Government if formed and accepted by the people. 159
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 7 Same subject: Requests telegraphic reply to the above telegram. 159
Mr. Egan to Mr. Wharton (telegram). Sept. 7 Same subject: Provisional government established on the 4th is accepted by the people and in cordial communication with the legation. 160
197 Same to same Sept. 7 Same subject: Provisional Government has officially notified the legation of its constitution and assumption of power, and has been likewise recognized. 160
198 Same to same Sept. 7 Asylum: Refugees on board American and German war vessels. Informal feelers for their surrender are met by positive refusal of the American legation and German admiral. 161
199 Same to same Sept. 10 Paper money issued by the late government will be recognized by the new one. 162
201 Same to same Sept. 16 Members of the cabinet appointed. 162
202 Same to same Sept. 16 General elections will take place on Oct. 18. 163
[Page LIII]203 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Sept. 17 Neutrality: Denial by Rear-Admiral Brown of the rumor that information of the landing of revolutionists at Quinteros was brought to Valparaiso by the U. S. S. San Francisco, has been made public to counteract ill feeling running against the United States. 163
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 21 Suicide of Balmaceda 165
204 Same to same Sept. 21 Same subject: Balmaceda’s letter to the Argentine minister. 165
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 24 Asylum: Refugees in the legation would be tried criminally and their lives endangered if surrendered; it will not be done except under safe conduct. The legation is watched by police; two of the servants have been arrested and are in prison; firm protest has been made. 166
Same to same Sept. 25 Disrespect to legation: Arrests of visitors amount to 20 in two days; no reply has been made to his protest and he has entered another. 166
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). Sept. 26 Same subject: The question of right of asylum will be discussed later, but the United States will insist that no disrespect is shown to the legation, and prompt action from Chile is expected. 167
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 26 Asylum: Information concerning the refugees requested. 167
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 27 Same subject: Reply to the above; names former situations, etc., of refugees given; the charge of conspiracy brought against them has been denied in a note in which safe conduct is again asked for; that favor was granted to 2 officers who had entered the British legation. 167
Same to same (telegram)—. Sept. 28 Same subject: No answer has been made to his note referred to above. 168
205 Same to same Sept. 29 Same subject: Particulars regarding, the questions of asylum condensed in previous telegrams; status of the case regarding the other legations; correspondence with minister of foreign affairs relating thereto inclosed. 168
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 30 Same subject: Safe conduct refused by minister of foreign affairs, who renews the charge of conspiracy against the refugees; no more arrests of visitors to the legation have been made. 177
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). Oct. 1 Same subject: The right of asylum cannot now be denied by Chile after being freely recognized; deprecates acts of disrespect to the legation, and recommends that the asylum be not abused by the refugees. 177
Same to same (telegram) Oct, 1 Same subject: Instructions to keep the Department fully advised. 178
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 3 Same subject: The minister of foreign affairs denies any intention of disrespect to the legation, but insists upon the right of taking outside of the legation precautions against conspiracy. 178
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram). Oct. 6 Same subject: Information concerning refugees in other legations requested. 179
208 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Oct. 6 Disrespect to legation: Confirms in detail previous telegrams; particulars concerning several of the American and other visitors arrested on leaving the legation; the Spanish minister has agreed to act in harmony with the United States minister respecting the refugees in his legation; his correspondence and interviews with the minister of foreign affairs. 179
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 8 Asylum: Number of refugees originally received and actually remaining in the several legations given; visitors to Spanish legation also arrested; no safe conduct granted in any case, but some allowed to leave under bond. 184
136 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan. Oct. 9 Outrage on Mr. Stephenson: Action reported in No. 191 is approved. 184
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Oct. 13 Asylum: The reply of foreign office expresses regret for disrespect shown to legation, which was in violation of orders, and that safe conducts can not be granted in consequence of decree submitting refugees to criminal trial. 184
Same to same Oct. 17 Same subject: Mr. Egan has repeated request for safe conducts. Precedents citing principles set by the Chilean Government. 185
[Page LIV]209 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Oct. 17 Same subject: Incloses notes referred to in the telegrams of Oct. 13 and 17 and decree instituting criminal proceedings against refugees. 185
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 18 Assault on seamen of the U. S. S. Baltimore: Announces the killing of one and wounding of 5 men, and the wounding of 1 Chilean. 194
211 Same to same. Oct. 19 Same subject: Letters of Capt. Schley, of the Baltimore, to the legation and to the intendente of Valparaiso. 194
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 20 Asylum: Substance of the reply to request for safe conduct in which the right of Chile to decline to grant the same is maintained. Another decree provides that prisoners will not be brought before the courts or liberated even under order of the supreme courts. Victory of the Liberals at the polls. 195
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 23 Same subject: substance of Mr. Egan’s reply to the above suspending discussion pending decision of the United States Government, but giving reasons why the refusal of safe conduct must be interpreted as an unfriendly act. 196
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 23 Assault on the seamen of the Baltimore: Capt. Schley reports the attack to have been unprovoked; the legation will wait for instructions. 196
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Egan (telegram.) Oct. 23 Same subject: In view of the participation of the police and of the delay on the part of the Government of Chile to offer any expression of regret or of purpose to punish the perpetrators, instructs him to request an explanation. 196
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram.) Oct. 26 Asylum: Persistent refusal to grant safe conduct; he thinks further exchange of notes would be useless. 197
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 26 Assault on the seamen of the Baltimore: Asks what reparation is expected. 197
213 Same to same Oct. 26 Asylum: Incloses, with comments, copies of the notes from and to the Chilean Government and decree of the Junta and of the Supreme Court relative to refugees. 198
214 Same to same Oct. 26 Political: Result of the legislative elections. 202
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Oct. 28 Instructions to maintain his position and to draw for any amount needed. 203
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 28 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Reply of the Chilean Government to Mr. Egan’s note. It will recognize no authority to judge the case but that established by the nation. The American sailors were made to sign a document in Spanish, and no officer allowed to be present at the examination. 203
217 Same to same Oct. 28 Same subject: Confirms with particulars the above telegram; incloses Capt. Schley’s letter to the legation and report to the board of investigation, and notes exchanged with the Chilean foreign office. 204
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 30 Same subject: The investigation is secret; Capt. Schley and the United States consul at Valparaiso have been invited to submit evidence and will refer it to the legation; requests instructions. 210
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 31 Same subject: Reply of the minister of foreign affairs expresses no regret; says that the result will be communicated and the guilty punished, and gives the report of the inten-dente exonerating the police; denying any knowledge of the origin of the trouble or of Riggin’s murderer, and describing the assault as a free fight among drunken sailors. 210
Same to same (telegram) Oct. 31 Instructions of Oct. 28 acknowledged. 211
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Nov. 1 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Instructions to have the paper signed by the sailors shown to him and to allow no officer or man to testify except in the presence of a counsel in his own language and publicly. 211
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Nov. 3 Same subject: Capt. Schley has been advised to tender evidence in accordance with the above instructions; the same judge who refused to let officers of the Baltimore attend the examination, granted that favor to the secretary of the German consulate in a similar circumstance one month earlier. 211
[Page LV]220 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Nov. 3 Same subject: Confirms in detail his telegrams of Oct. 31 and Nov. 3. Incloses note of minister of foreign affairs referred to in the telegram of Oct. 31; two letters of Capt. Schley giving the names of witnesses and reply thereto; correspondence between Capt. Schley and the intendente of Valparaiso, and letter of the United States consul at Valparaiso, relative to the favor mentioned in the telegram of Nov. 3 as having been granted to the secretary of the German consulate. 211
Mr. Blaine to Mr. McCreery (telegram). Nov. 3 Same subject: Full information requested by cable. 217
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Nov. 7 Outrage on fireman Shields of the steamship Keweenaw, reported by consul at Valparaiso; the ill treatment followed upon arrest on a charge of drunkenness. 217
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 7 Asylum: Threats against the legation fomented by the press alleging a conspiracy of the refugees. Measures were taken by the authorities against hostile demonstration, resolved in a public meeting, but no denial of the charge was made previously to the meeting. 217
222 Same to same Nov. 7 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Incloses correspondence between Capt. Schley and the intendente in regard to witnesses, and second letter from the United States consul at Valparaiso relative to the attendance of secretary of the German consulate at investigation. 218
Mr. McCreery to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Nov. 8 Same subject: Full report transmitted as directed by Mr. Blaine’s telegram of Nov. 3. 220
223 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine. Nov. 9 Outrage on Patrick Shields, of the Keweenaw: Incloses letter of United States consul to intendente at Valparaiso, together with medical report of injuries sustained, reply of intentendente referring the matter to the judge of crime, and consul’s letter reporting that Shields’ name does not appear on the police records and that Shields was not brought before any court. 223
224 Same to same Nov. 9 Asylum: Confirmatory of telegram of Nov. 7; incloses extract of La Union relating to alleged conspiracy and object of the meeting, call of said meeting, protest of Mr. Egan and Señor Matta’s reply, and denial of conspiracy by the intendente. 223
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 10 Friendly sentiments expressed by the president of the provisional government at the call made officially by Mr. Egan. 226
226 Same to same Nov. 10 Same subject: Confirms the above 226
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 11 Election of Señor Montt for President and resignation of the provisional government at the convening of Congress. New cabinet not yet formed, but better feeling is anticipated. 227
229 Same to same. Nov. 11 Confirms the above 227
230 Same to same Nov. 11 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore; The investigation is declared by Señor Malta to be delayed by the refusal of Capt. Schley and Consul McCreery to supply the judge with necessary information pending instructions from the legation. 228
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 14 The cabinet remains in office as previously constituted, but changes are expected before the end of the year. 229
231 Same to same. Nov. 14 Confirms the above 229
232 Same to same. Nov. 16 Asylum: Refugees were received as guests at a cost of upwards of $5,000; the Spanish legation provided shelter only. 229
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 17 Disrespect to the legation: Protest has been made to the Chilean Government of the insulting conduct of spies by whom the legation is watched. 229
234 Same to same Nov. 19 Attacks on Mr. Egan by Mr. Julio Poster in New York: Incloses his note to Señor Matta complaining that they were made under assumption of official character, and reply thereto denying that Mr. Poster was ever vested with any authority. 230
[Page LVI]235 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Nov. 20 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Correspondence between Capt. Schley and the intendente of Valparaiso relative to the taking of the testimony of the men before the judge of crime, and to the protection of American officers and sailors on shore: inclosed. 232
236 Same to same Nov. 20 Disrespect to the legation by intoxicated spies: Incloses his note of protest, the reply of Señor Matta, which, evading the question presented therein, hints at provocation on the part of the refugees, and Mr. Egan’s final reply. 236
237 Same to same Nov. 23 Outrage on Patrick Shields: Incloses copy of papers, which have been presented to the Chilean Government in a note, copy of which is inclosed except that relating to a claim for $5,000, which it was thought best to withhold pending the investigation into the Baltimore case. 238
241 Same to same Nov. 30 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: The testimony of the men was given on the 20th under the conditions approved by the Navy Department; incloses correspondence between Capt. Schley and the intendente making arrangements to that purpose. 246
242 Same to same Nov. 30 Disrespect to the legation: The minister of foreign affairs again intimates that the occurrences complained of were brought on by indiscretions of the refugees or of their friends; Mr. Egan denies the charge. 248
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Dec. 3 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Desires to know who asked Mr. Egan for his testimony which he is said by the Chilean minister to have declined to give. 250
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Dec. 3 Animosity against Americans is fostered by publication of official correspondence in the Baltimore case; safe-conducts are still refused, and watching of the legation by obnoxious spies continued. 250
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 4 Asylum: Impeachment of refugees having been moved in Congress, the Secretary requested leave to notify them in person without using the channels of the foreign office. Mr. Egan expressed his surprise at this course. He says that unless otherwise instructed he will not receive any personal service in the legation. 250
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 4 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Reply to Mr. Blaine’s telegram of December 3. His testimony was not asked. Explanations furnished. 251
243 Same to same Dec. 4 Same subject: The investigation which, under Chilean law, should be secret, is published in a manner conducive to animosity against Americans. Incloses letter of Capt. Schley protesting against this and covering correspondence with the Intendente. 251
244 Same to same Dec. 4 Asylum: Safe-conducts are still refused 254
245 Same to same Dec. 5 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Confirms the telegram of the 4th relative to the giving of his testimony and explains that the minister of foreign affairs declared himself satisfied with the observations presented in an interview held in that respect. 255
246 Same to same Dec. 5 Outrage on Patrick Shields: Submits additional facts which were requested by the Chilean Government and furnished by the consul at Valparaiso; correspondence inclosed. 256
247 Same to same Dec. 7 Asylum: Confirms the telegram of December 4, and incloses the letter of the Secretary of the Chamber of Deputies, Mr. Egan’s note to the foreign office, Señor Matta’s reply offering explanations for the irregular course of the Secretary but maintaining the request for service of the impeachment at the legation, and Mr. Egan’s note declining the same. 261
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Dec. 9 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Asks whether the minister of foreign affairs requested Mr. Egan’s testimony. 263
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Dec. 12 Same subject: In reply to the above repeats the substance of his dispatch No. 245. 263
[Page LVII]249 Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine Dec. 12 Same subject: Confirms the above. 264
250 Same to same Dec. 12 Same subject: Incloses correspondence between Captain Schley and the Intendente touching the closing of the examination of the Baltimore sailors. 264
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 12 Difficulties with Chile: Offensive instructions sent by Señor Matta to the Chilean minister at Washington in reply to the President’s annual message; it was read in the Senate and published in all the papers. 267
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 13 Same subject: Text of his note asking whether the above as published was read by authority of the Government. The instructions have been telegraphed to all Chilean legations abroad. 269
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 14 Same subject: Text of Señor Matta’s reply to above note. He holds that those instructions being sent to the Chilean minister can not be discussed with the United States representative. 270
251 Same to same Dec. 14 Same subject: Confirms the above telegrams, points to misstatements in the document and says that by reason of its publication and general offensiveness he will suspend intercourse with the Chilean Government until it is withdrawn or instructions sent him from Washington. 270
158 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan Dec. 15 Outrage on Patrick Shields: Mr. Egan’s dispatch No. 223 is acknowledged with approval of the action taken in the matter by the united States consul at Valparaiso. 272
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Dec. 17 Disrespect to legation; the legation has suspended intercourse with the foreign office; it is still submitted to offensive espionage, and violent attacks from the press, Mr. Egan’s position is approved by the diplomatic corps. 272
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 19 Same subject; Arrest of Mr. Egan’s son reported. 273
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 21 Same subject: Arrest of several visitors to the legation; the Argentine minister promises to consult with the diplomatic corps of which he is dean, and to interview the minister of foreign affairs. 273
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 22 Same subject: The Argentine minister has been promised that uniformed police only will be left around the legation; the promise but partly fulfilled. 273
253 Same to same. Dec. 22 Same subject: Confirms previous telegrams, and incloses his invitation to the Argentine minister to call at the legation and see to what treatment it was being subjected. 273
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 22 Inauguration of the President of Chile will take place on the 26th; asks if he is to attend. 275
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Dec. 22 Instructs Mr. Egan not to make his dispatches public. 275
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Dec. 24 Acknowledges the above and says he has always been very careful in that respect. 275
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Dec. 27 Disrespect to legation: Reports the continuation of offensive surveillance; the publication of false statements by the police; his nonattendance at the inauguration of the President of Chile. 276
256 Same to same Dec. 28 Same subject: Incloses the police reports mentioned in the above telegram and refutes the assertions found in those reports; confirms with details the statements of the said telegram and incloses the speech delivered by the president of the Senate at the banquet following the Presidential inauguration. 276
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 30 Difficulties with Chile: Attitude of the minister of foreign affairs remains unchanged in spite of pleadings of British Minister, prompted by information received by Chilean Government as to the intention of the United States to issue an ultimatum. Better feeling may be hoped for when new ministry is formed. 284
Same to same (telegram) Dec. 31 Same subject: The new ministry, comprising personal friends of Mr. Egan, has been formed; some of the members have openly disavowed the course of the preceding cabinet and a prompt settlement may he looked to. 284
[Page LVIII] Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). 1892. Jan. 8 Same subject: Asks specially whether satisfaction will be given on all points by the new ministry. 284
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 11 Right of asylum: This being in Valparaiso for the purpose of placing two refugees on, board the Yorktown prevented him from seeing the minister for foreign affairs. No safe conduct has been granted, and five refugees remain in the legation. 285
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 12 Same subject: The minister for foreign affairs has given oral permission for the refugees to leave, but no written safe conduct: the legation is free from espoinage, and the absence of the President makes it impossible to return an immediate answer as to the withdrawal of the Matta circular. 285
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 11 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: A condensed abstract of the judge’s report on the investigation. 285
Same to same Jan. 13 Asylum: The five remaining refugees and two from the Spanish legation have been placed on board the U. S. S. Yorktown, the Spanish and the Italian ministers accompanying Mr. Egan. 286
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Jan. 13 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Asks whether evidence given by the Baltimore men or officers has been thrown out because conflicting. 286
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 15 Same subject: Replies to the above in the affirmative, giving particulars. Difficulties with Chile. 286
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 15 Submits the terms on which the Chilian Government proposes to withdraw Señor Matta’s circular. 287
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan Jan. 16 Same subject: Discusses the above proposition; declares that the withdrawal should be prompt and suitable. 287
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 17 Asylum: Relates the interview in which verbal guarantee was given for the safe departure of the refugees by the minister, subsequently confirmed by the under secretary, and then withdrawn by the minister. 287
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 17 Same subject: Gives extract of Chilean newspaper deriding the situation of the refugees on board the Yorktown. 288
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 18 Difficulties with Chile: Answer of Chilean Government is delayed on the ground of necessity for consultation. 288
263 Same to same. Jan. 18 Assault on the sailors of the Baltimore: Incloses an arraignment of the investigation by a Chilean newspaper, and a translation by an English newspaper of the Fiscal’s report. 289
265 Same to same Jan. 19 Asylum: Incloses memoranda of interviews referred to in his telegram of January 17. 304
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 20 Difficulties with Chile: No answer yet from the minister of foreign affairs. 306
Same to same (telegram) Jan. 21 Same subject: No answer has been received from the minister for foreign affairs, notwithstanding his promise of an early reply. Asks whether the report that the withdrawal was made in Washington is true, as rumored in Santiago. 307
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Jan. 21 Same subject: The President, satisfied that the assault on the sailors of the Baltimore was prompted by a feeling of resentment against the United States, demands the same reparation which the United States would freely concede, viz.: A suitable apology and adequate indemnity; in the matter of Mr. Matta’s instractions to Minister Montt, the publicity given to it calls for an immediate withdrawal and suitable apology; if satisfaction is not given at once diplomatic relations will be terminated; the question of Mr. Egan’s recall at the request of the Chilian Government will not be considered until a reply to this note has been received. 307
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 21 Same subject: Repeats the substance of his telegram of same date. 309
Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 22 Same subject: The instructions of January 21 will be delivered to-morrow. Assurances of friendship were given him on January 11 by Prime Minister Luco. 309
[Page LIX] Mr. Egan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Jan. 25 Same subject: Reply of the Chilean Government to the note of January 21. The question of indemnity for the assault on the sailors of the Baltimore is offered for arbitration by the United States Supreme Court Or any other tribunal; Señor Matta’s telegram is withdrawn without reservation and the recall of Minister Egan left to the discretion of the United States. 309
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Egan (telegram). Jan. 30 Same subject: The reply of the Chilean Government satisfactory, and has given great gratification to the President and people of the United States. 312

correspondence with the chilean legation.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Blaine. 1891. Jan. 16 Revolution: Official notice of the revolt of the Chilean Navy. The Chilean Government will not be answerable for their acts. 313
Mr. Blaine to Señor Lazcano. Jan. 20 Same subject: Acknowledges the above, and makes reservations as to the declaration of nonresponsibility. 313
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 10 Neutrality: Requests that shipment of war munitions be prevented. 314
Mr. Blaine to Señor Lazcano. Mar. 13 Same subject: The manufacture, sale, and shipment of war munitions can not be stopped under the laws of the United States. Viola-lations of neutrality laws come within the jurisdiction of the courts. 314
Señor Luca to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Mar. 22 Same subject: Request for the prohibition of the sale of arms to the Balmaceda party. Extent of territory occupied by the Congressional party. 315
Same to same (telegram) Mar. 24 Same subject: Request not to permit the shipment of silver by President Balmaceda on board United States war vessel. 315
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Blaine (telegram). April 2 Political revolt of elections held on the 29th of March. 315
Same to same May 5 Neutrality: Calls attention to the arrival at Santiago of the Steamer Itata in the service of the revolutionists and to its intended breach of the neutrality laws of the United States. 316
Señor Jorge Montt to Mr. Blaine (telegram). May 16 Agent of the Junta: Mr. Richard L. Trumbull designated to act as. 316
Señor Errazuriz to Mr. Blaine (telegram). June 5 Neutrality: Surrender of the Itata and her cargo. 317
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Wharton. June 22 Same subject: Mission of Señor Pedro Montt as diplomatic representative of the Junta. Urges that it be given no recognition and cites precedents set by the United States Government at the time of the civil war. 317
Congress of Chile June 20 Resolutions in support of President Balmaceda. 320
Mr. Wharton to Señor Lazcano. June 20 Acknowledges Señor Lazcano’s note of June 22. 321
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Wharton. July 4 Neutrality: The Itata was taken by force from the Chilean South American Steamship Company. 321
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Lazcano. July 9 Same subject: A copy of the above note and of the telegram of May 8 from the United States Consul at Valparaiso have been sent to the Attorney-General. 322
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Wharton. July 18 Same subject: Requests a copy of the papers mentioned in the foregoing note. 322
Mr. Wharton to Señor Lazcano. July 21 Same subject: Copies transmitted as above requested. 322
Señor Pedro Montt to Mr. Blaine. Aug. 28 Defeat of the Balmaceda forces and surrender of the city of Valparaiso. 323
Señor Lazcano to Mr. Wharton. Sept. 4 Announces his departure from the United States. 323
Mr. Wharton to Señor Lazcano. Sept. 7 Acknowledges the above note 323
Señor Pedro Montt to Mr. Blaine. Nov. 24 Letter of President Montt to President Harrison announcing the installation of the provisional government. 324
Mr. Blaine to Señor Pedro Montt. Nov. 27 Acknowledges the above 324
[Page LX] Señor Matta to Señor Montt (telegram). Dec. 1 Assault on the seamen of the Baltimore: Statement of experts and testimony of Minister Egan the cause of the delay in the preliminary examination. 324
Señor Montt to Mr. Blaine Dec. 11 Same subject: Explains the delay occurring in the completion of the investigation and disclaims any motive offensive to the United States. 325
Same to same Dec. 19 Same subject: Incloses correspondence exchanged by the Chilean Minister for Foreign Affairs with the United States Legation and and the authorities of Valparaiso and submits explanations concerning the origin, progress, and subsidence of the disturbance ance and the mode of conducting the preliminary investigation. 326
Same to same Dec. 31 Disrespect to the United States legation: Correspondence relating to the subject, inclosed. 339

correspondence with the chilean legation at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Señor Montt to Mr. Blaine. 1891. Dec. 31 Assault on the seamen of the Baltimore: Transmits a telegram from Señor Matta relative to the progress of the judicial investigation. 343
Same to same 1892. Jan. 4 Same subject: Transmits telegram of Señor Pereira, minister for foreign relations, announcing the sending of the attorney-general’s report. 343
Same to same Jan. 8 Same subject: Gives the substance of the findings of the prosecuting attorney and expresses regret for the occurrence of the attack. 344
Same to same Jan. 14 Outrage on Patrick Shields: Copy of telegram concisely stating the case. 345
Same to same Jan. 18 Asylum: Copy of telegram relating to the situation on board of the U. S. S. Yorktown to whom no safe-conduct has been granted. 345
Same to same. Jan. 20 Diplomatic relations: Request for the recall of Minister Egan. 345
Mr. Blaine to Señor Montt Jan. 20 Difficulties with Chile: Incloses copy of telegraphic instructions sent to Mr. Egan January 21. 346
Señor Montt to Mr. Blaine. Jan. 23 Assault on the seamen of the Baltimore: The testimony of the men as given in Valparaiso is inclosed for the purpose of bringing out its contradiction of that given at Vallejo by J. M. Talbot. 346
Same to same Jan. 23 Difficulties with Chile: Presents a defense of the action of his Government and presents a statement of’ the course of negotiations conducted in personal interviews at the Department of State. 347
Mr. Blaine to Señor Montt Jan. 27 Same subject: Corrects some of the statements appearing in the above. 351

china.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1192 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine 1890. Nov. 12 Missionary troubles at Chinanfu: Incloses note from the yamên stating that the action of the missionaries is at variance with their former representations. 353
1212 Same to same Dec. 13 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Incloses note declining to reopen the case. 354
1215 Same to same Dec. 15 Audience to foreign ministers by the Emperor: Incloses decree ordering it 355
1218 Same to same Dec. 24 Same subject: Incloses protocol signed by foreign representatives in regard to the question. 357
1227 Same to same 1891. Jan. 8 Same subject. He has been designated by his colleagues to conduct negotiations with the yamên. 357
[Page LXI]1234 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Jan. 26 Same subject: Reports the result of negotiations referred to above; suggests that his credentials be renewed or confirmed for the occasion. 360
584 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby. Jan. 27 Same subject. Credentials will be issued to him, although it is believed the original letter would suffice. 363
1236 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Jan. 28 Same subject: Incloses protocol of the meeting of foreign representatives and memorandum for the guidance of the members of the yamên. 363
587 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Feb. 10 Same subject: Acknowledges No. 1215 and awaits further report as to objectionable features of formalities reported in a press telegram. 367
590 Same to same Feb. 14 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Approves his suggestion to reserve the case for the present, but instructs him to reserve the rights of the United States. 367
1250 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Feb. 23 Audience by the Emperor: Incloses papers relating to meetings of the foreign representatives and interviews with the yamên. 367
1256 Same to same Feb. 28 Same subject. Reports and comments upon final arrangements agreed upon as to the ceremonial to be observed. 374
1260 Same to same Mar. 2 Same subject: Incloses additional papers relating to ceremonial to be observed. 382
1263 Same to same Mar. 10 Same subject: Describes the audience, incloses diagram of hall and addresses delivered. 385
1266 Same to same Mar. 16 Missionary troubles in Fuchan: Incloses proclamation prohibiting slanders against foreign missionaries. 392
603 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Mar. 30 Audience to ministers: Acknowledges dispatch 1236 and commends his insistence upon the right of ministers to a private audience on arrival. 392
1304 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine May 20 Riots at Wuhu against foreigners: Incloses joint note to the Tsung li yamên; describes the riots and suggests an increase of naval force. 393
1309 Same to same May 22 Same subject: Discusses the causes of the disturbance and reports the determination of foreign representatives to demand indemnity and severe punishment of the leaders. 395
1311 Same to same May 25 Same subject: Incloses account of the riot as published by the North China News. 396
1312 Same to same May 27 Riot at Nanking: Reports that it has been suppressed, but not until the American Methodist girls’ school had been destroyed by fire. The Tsung li yamên has agreed to take measures against rioting. 399
1314 Same to same May 28 Riots against foreigners: Incloses report of interview with the Tsung li yamên, and joint dispatch of European representatives relating to measures to be taken. 400
1316 Same to same. June 4 Same subject: Incloses reply of the Tsung li yamên to the joint note in dispatch No. 1304 asserting that all possible measures have been and are being taken. 401
1317 Same to same June 5 Same subject: Measures taken by the Chinese Government for the suppression and prevention of riots. 402
Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine (telegram). June 7 Same subject: Situation is serious, and the edict which was to be issued for the protection of foreigners is suffering delay. 404
1318 Same to same June 8 Same subject: Confirms the above telegram with particulars. 404
623 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Denby. June 10 Same subject: The Chinese minister at Washington has been informed of the hope that steps will be taken for the protection of foreigners. 405
1320 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine June 10 Same subject: Gives an account of the further spreading of riots. 405
1321 Same to same June 11 Same subject: Incloses joint note of foreign representatives to Tsung-li yamên, urging the adoption of efficient measures. 406
1323 Same to same June 13 Same subject: The continued spreading of riots may lead to war between France and China. 408
1324 Same to same June 18 Same subject: Imperial edict issued for the protection of foreigners. 409
[Page LXII]1328 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine June 23 Same subject: Joint note to the Tsung-li yamên denies allegations of wrongs on the part of the missionaries, and makes threats of further action by the foreign powers if the edict is not rigorously enforced. 411
1330 Same to same June 28 Same subject: False reports circulated to arouse public feeling against foreigners. 413
1331 Same to same June 29 Same subject: Destruction of the American Foreign Christian Missionary Society’s house at Wu Ney Chen. 414
1337 Same to same July 3 Same subject: Destruction of French orphanage at Haimen. 415
1340 Same to same July 6 Same subject: Contention between a committee of foreign representatives and the Tsung-li yamên as to steps taken for the arrest and punishment of leaders. 415
637 Mr. Adee to Mr. Denby July 8 Same subject: Commends the efforts of Mr. Denby towards securing protection to American citizens in China. 416
1341 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine July 11 Same subject: Communication of the Tsung-li yamên to the dean of the diplomatic corps reciting the action of the Chinese Government toward the prevention and suppression of riots. 416
1343 Same to same July 12 Same subject: Communication of the Tsung-li yamên to the foreign representatives furnishing explanations and making suggestions in regard to the riots. 417
1344 Same to same July 12 Same subject: Reports further destruction by mobs of Roman Catholic chapels. 419
1346 Same to same July 13 Same subject: Memorial of the Tsung-li yamên to the throne upon which the imperial edict of June 15 was issued. 419
1363 Same to same July 29 Same subject: Threats of general destruction of religious edifices at Canton, upon which Admiral Belknap was requested to take adequate precautionary measures. 421
1368 Same to same. Aug. 14 Same subject: Communication of the foreign representatives to the Tsung-li yamên reciting the shortcomings of China in protecting foreigners and making specific demands for appropriate action. 422
1374 Same to same. Aug. 21 Same subject: Riot in Manchuria 424
1375 Same to same Aug. 28 Same subject: History of the vicissitudes of Christian missionary work in China. 424
1378 Same to same Aug. 29 Same subject: Reply of the Tsung-li yamên to the communication inclosed in dispatch No. 1368; the foreign representatives do not accept it as satisfactory, and meet it by formal demands. 427
1380 Same to same Aug. 31 Missionary troubles at Chinanfu: The Tsung-li yamén contends that the laud held by the missionaries is sufficient for building “purposes, and that other grounds are refused only because none is available. 431
1381 Same to same Aug. 31 Missionary troubles at Chining Chow: Note to the Tsung-li-yamén claiming protection for the missionaries who had to leave that city. 434
1387 Same to same Sept. 13 Riots against foreigners: Reports a serious riot at Ichang. Correspondence exchanged between the yamén and the diplomatic representatives. 435
1388 Same to same Sept. 14 Same subject: Measures taken by the British Government at Hankow and Ichang. 438
1389 Same to same Sept. 17 Same subject: Joint note of diplomatic corps protesting against insufficient protection and lack of energy of the Chinese Government. 439
1390 Same to same Sept. 21 Riot at Ichang: Full account as printed in the North China Daily News transmitted. 443
1391 Same to same Sept. 23 Riots against foreigners: Measures taken by the Chinese Government in prevision of a threatened riot at Wuchang. 449
1393 Same to same. Sept. 26 Riot at Ichang: Report of United States consul Andrews. No American injured. 450
1399 Same to same Oct. 5 Missionary troubles at Chinanfu; Protest of Minister Denby against the difficulties raised in regard to the holding of land by Rev. Gilbert Reid. 451
1410 Same to same Oct. 24 Riots against foreigners: Action taken by the Chinese Government toward the punishment of rioters. 452
[Page LXIII]1411 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Oct. 24 Same subject: Official report of the viceroy of Hu Kwang on the subject of the riots at’ Wu-such. 453
1415 Same to same Oct. 31 Missionary troubles at Chinanfu: Final and satisfactory settlement reached. 454

correspondence with the legation of china at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine 1890. Dec. 18 Audience by the Emperor of China to the foreign representatives will be given on a stated date every year. 455
Mr. Pung to Mr. Blaine 1891. Mar. 9 Same subject: Audience was held on March 5, followed the next day by a banquet. 455
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pung Mar. 11 Same subject: Acknowledges with gratification the above note. 456
The Chinese consul-general at San Francisco to Mr. Tsui. May 29 Chinese immigration: Detention of Chinese of the privileged class holding certificates of the Chinese consul at Yokohama, reported. 456
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Tsui June 1 Same subject: The Chinese above referred to permitted to land; asks to be formally advised whether Chinese consuls are authorized by their Government to issue certificates. 456
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Wharton June 2 Same subject: Answers to above question in the affirmative. 457
Same to same June 8 Riots in China against foreigners: Asks communication of Minister Denby’s telegram of June 7, previous to telegraphing to his Government. 457
Same to same June 9 Same subject: Gives reasons for the above request, and announces that he has cabled to his Government the desire of the United States that measures be taken for the protection of its citizens. 458
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Tsui June 10 Same subject: Names places where riots have occurred. 458
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine. June 13 Same subject: Protection assured to American citizens. 458
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Tsui June 16 Same subject: Acknowledges the above 459
Same to same June 17 Chinese immigration: Certificates delivered by Chinese consuls to privileged classes will be accepted by customs officials. 459
The Chinese consul-general at San Francisco to Mr. Tsui. July 24 Outrage on Chinese merchants at Vallejo, Cal 461
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Tsui July 25 Same subject: A report has been requested from the governor of California. 461
Same to same Aug. 11 Same subject: Incloses report above referred to. 462
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Wharton Aug. 13 Same subject: Report of the Chinese consul-general transmitted, with a request that the rioters be punished. 466
Memorandum. Aug. 17 Riots in China: Interview between Mr. Wharton and Mr. Tsui relative to the sending of United States war vessels to Chinese waters for the protection of United States citizens. 468
Memorandum Sept. 25 Same subject: Interview between Mr. Wharton and Mr. Tsui relating to aid given the rioters by British subjects in supplying them with smuggled arms. 468

colombia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
164 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine. 1890. Dec. 17 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith at Colon: Remonstrances of legation as to interpretation of consular convention by Colombian Government. Careful consideration has been verbally promised. 469
145 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott 1891. Jan. 16 Same subject: Action above reported is approved. 472
[Page LXIV]190 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 26 Same subject: The Colombian Government maintains the position originally assumed; incloses long argument in support of its opinion, and discusses precedents and status of the question as affecting other powers. 472
193 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Abbott. June 17 Same subject: Discusses the above argument, and while it is apparently futile to continue the controversy, declares that the position of the United States is taken on what the law is at this date in both countries. 480
275 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine. Oct. 17 Same subject: The Colombian Government declines to consider the proposition of arbitration or to recede from its position. Consuls of the United States will, subject to approval of the Department, be instructed not to join with local courts in naming a “curador” of estates. Notes to and from the minister for foreign affairs inclosed. 482
228 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott. Dec. 2 Same subject: Approves of instructions to consuls in regard to the naming of a “curador. “ 486

Denmark.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
52 Mr. Carr to Mr. Blaine 1891. Sept. 8 Hog products: Removal of the restrictions on the importation from the United States of, announced. 487
53 Same to same Sept. 9 Same subject: Incloses note from the minister of foreign affairs, notifying the removal of restrictions. 487
55 Same to same Sept. 14 Same subject: Decree removing the restrictions transmitted. 488
43 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Carr Sept. 23 Same subject: Expresses Department’s gratification at the removal of restrictions. 488

france.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
285 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Reid 1891. June 8 Hog products: Restrictions on the importation of, from the United States to France. Requests, in behalf of the Agricultural Department, a report on the status of the question. 489
392 Mr. Reid to Mr. Blaine July 23 Same subject: Reports the passage by the lower chamber of a bill establishing a fixed duty on American meats which, however, failed by reason of the Senate being unable to discuss it before adjournment. 490
428 Same to same Oct. 8 Military service: Case of John Maurice Hubbard who, while having never resided in the United States, procured from the United States consul at Havre papers which are expected to secure exemption from. Quotes French law subjecting aliens born in France to military service unless proof is shown that they have retained the nationality of parents, and transmits forms in use. 491
Same to same Oct. 29 Hog products: Removal of prohibition. Reports vote of the Senate accepting the principle and leaving for discussion only the exact figure of duty on American pork. 493
353 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Reid. Oct. 30 Military service: Case of John Maurice Hubbard. The protection and assistance to be accorded by the legation to Mr. Hubbard depend upon his intentions as to his future residence. 493
Mr. Reid to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 30 Hog products: The Senate fixed the duty on American pork at 25 francs per 100 kilograms. 495
Same to same (telegram) Nov. 16 Same subject: The chamber of deputies after protracted discussion agreed to the duty of 25 francs. 495
[Page LXV]

germany.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
146 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps 1890. Sept. 8 Military service of John Haberacker, who came as a minor to the United States with his widowed mother who became naturalized by marriage: Instructs him to secure his release from the army in which he was impressed during a visit to Bavaria. 496
177 Mr. Coleman to Mr. Blaine. Sept. 23 Same subject: Note directed to the German foreign office in obedienee to the above. 500
223 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine 1891. Jan. 24 Hog products: Reports a debate in the Reichstag on the question of removing the prohibition of American pork. 501
224 Same to same Jan. 31 Military service of John Haberacker: Adverts to the indifference manifested by John Haberacker who has made no complaint even at the consulate of the United States in the city where he is serving. The matter of his release has been referred by the Imperial Government to the Bavarian Government. 503
229 Same to same Feb. 6 Hog products: Note addressed to the foreign office in vindication of the healthfulness of American pork. 505
245 Same to same Mar. 2 Military service of John Haberacker: The Bavarian Government will not release him until satisfied that he has acquired citizenship under the law of the United States by the marriage of his mother. 507
229 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps Mar. 26 Same subject: Argues that by virtue of sections 1994 and 2172, Revised Statutes, and of decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States, and of the supreme courts of New York and Missouri, Haberacker is legally an American citizen. 507
245 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Phelps May 1 Assisted immigration of Nikolaus Bader, who, according to his own affidavit, is a convict discharged from a lunatic asylum and had his passage paid by the authorities of Stauzach, Germany: Instructions to call attention to the case. 509
257 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps June 15 Hog products: Refers to overtures made by the German legation at Washington to grant the removal of the prohibition on American pork in return for the exemption of German sugars from duty; as the prohibition is based on the alleged absence of or imperfect inspection, it is hoped that the prohibition will promptly be removed, in view of the recently enacted inspection law, irrespective of reciprocity negotiations. 511
289 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine July 1 Passport application of Christian Henne, born in the United States of a naturalized father: Asks certain information in regard to forms to be used in this and similar cases. 512
292 Same to same July 6 Hog products: Note addressed to the foreign office in the matter of the removal of the prohibition. 514
271 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps July 18 Same subject: The German legation at Washington having the matter in charge, he is only to have the officials of the German Government bear in mind that a removal of the prohibition is expected by September 1. 515
276 Same to same July 22 Passport application of Christian Henne: The “native” form is to be used. Reviews the law, practice, and precedents bearing on the question. 515
324 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Sept. 3 Hog products: Removal of the prohibition announced. Decree inclosed. 517
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 12 Same subject: American pork admitted on no other condition than the presentation of an American inspection certificate. 518
305 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps Sept. 22 Same subject: Gratification expressed at the removal of prohibition. 518
342 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Oct. 17 Passport application of Mrs. Henry Cadmus, who” has resided abroad since 1873, and does not intend to return to the United States until the education of her children, all born abroad, is completed, referred to the Department. 518
344 Same to same Oct. 21 Military service of John Haberacker: Note addressed to the foreign office in accordance with instruction No. 229, above. 519
[Page LXVI]330 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Phelps Nov. 11 Passport application of Mrs. Henry Cadmus: Should he granted for the sake of her minor children, who are not responsible for their residing abroad. 521
303 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Dec. 3 Military service of John Haberacker: The Bavarian Government insists that as the act of naturalization was not perfected, the treaty of May 26, 1868, does not afford protection. 521
381 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Phelps 1892. Mar. 19 Same subject: Discusses the case at length in refutation of the Bavarian Government’s contention that neither Haberacker nor his mother has become a naturalized citizen as contemplated in the treaty. Prompt action toward his release is expected. 522

correspondence with the german legation at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Wharton to Count von Arco Valley. 1891. June 15 Hog products: Incloses act and regulations providing for the inspection of meats, and expresses the hope that the German Government will remove the prohibition on American pork. 527
Mr. von Mumm to Mr. Blaine. Sept. 3 Same subject: Gives notice of the removal of the prohibition in the German Empire. 528
Mr. Wharton to Mr. von Mumm. Sept. 10 Same subject: Acknowledges the above and expresses the gratification of the President. 528

great britain.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
825 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard 1888. Sept. 12 Bering Sea question: Reports that there is little prospect of completing a convention with Great Britain, who will do nothing without the agreement of Canada, and recommends repression by seizures as the only mode of putting a stop to the waste of seal life by Canadian sealers. 530
132 Mr. White to Mr. Blaine 1889. Dec. 4 Same subject: Letters published in the London Times by Sir George Baden Powell and by Mr. W. H. Flower on the question. 532
394 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine 1891. Jan. 24 Same subject: Answer of the British Government to a question asked in the Parliament in regard to the seizure of a Canadian sealer in Bering Sea. 533
470 Same to same June 6 Same subject: Debate in the British Parliament upon the third reading of the Bering Sea (seal fishery) bill. 534
472 Same to same June 10 Same subject: Debate in the British Parliament previously to the passage of the above bill. 535
592 Same to same 1892. Jan. 6 Same subject; Speech of Sir G. Baden Powell to his constituents with reference to his mission to the Bering Sea seal fisheries. 537
387 Same to same 1891. Jan. 17 Claim of William Webster to lands in New Zealand: The colonial government finds that by bringing his case before the land commission established by the act of 1856 Mr. Webster waived his right to be treated as an alien. 538
528 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Lincoln June 3 Same subject: Mr. Webster was at the time he is alleged to have submitted his claim to the land commissioners pressing the same in the United States. The reply of the British Government can not be regarded as satisfactory and conclusive. 539
515 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine Aug. 19 Same subject: In reply to a note from the legation the British Government admitted that Mr. Webster did not present his claim to the land commission in 1856 as originally stated, but in 1841, maintains that he then waived his right to present thereafter his claim as an American citizen. 541
[Page LXVII]

correspondence with the british legation at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Lord Salisbury to Sir Julian Pauncefote. 1391 Feb. 21 Bering Sea question: Reply to Mr. Blaine’s note of December 17: States that Great Britain took every step which it was in its power to take in order to make it clear to Russia that she did not accept claim to exclude her subjects for 100 miles distance from the coast which had been put forward in Ukase of 1821. Claims that words “Pacific Ocean,” used in treaty of 1825 with Russia, did include Bering Sea. Pro poses some changes to the questions to be submitted to arbitration. 542
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Apr. 14 Same subject: Gives six questions proposed for arbitration: The United States claim the same right to power beyond 3–mile limit as Great Britain; cites act of Parliament of 1889, attempting to control body of water on coast of Scotland 2,700 square miles in extent. Map of that body inclosed. 548
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 20 Same subject: The stoppage of all sealing at sea and on land seems to be acceptable to Lord Salisbury, who wishes to know whether it would be preferred that the proposal come from the British Government. 552
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 4 Same subject: Reviews the negotiations for a modus Vivendi pending the result of arbitration; concessions made by the President in consequence thereof; recital of the obligations imposed on the North American Company in return for the sealing privilege, which make it necessary that they should be allowed to take a limited number of seals contrary to the claim of Great Britain that scaling should be absolutely prohibited on both sides; submits terms of agreement on that basis. 552
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. May 5 Same subject: Acknowledges the above, of which a copy has been mailed, and precise terms telegraphed to London. Deprecates alleged delay; refers to previous interviews; mentions the exception taken at the two conditions that the right to kill a certain number of seals was reserved for the American company, and that the modus vivendi was not to be put in force until arbitration was agreed upon, and expresses satisfaction that the latter condition has been removed. 555
Mr. Adee to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 20 Same subject: Requests a reply to proposition of the 4th. 557
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Adee. May 21 Same subject; Reply requested has not yet been received, but is expected to arrive in the course of a day. 557
Mr. Adee to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 26 Same subject; Points to the reasons for which a prompt reply is desired; revenue cutters have been ordered to proceed to the fisheries, and the orders would be made definite by the conclusion of an agreement. 557
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Adee. May 27 Same subject: Regrets the delay, and makes excuse on the ground of the lateness of the proposal. 558
Sir Julian Pauncefote June 3 Same subject: Proposal for modus vivendi by the British Government. 558
Do do Same subject: Assents to the first five questions submitted by Mr. Blaine on April 14; makes a counter proposition in respect of question 6, and of compensation for damages sustained. 559
Mr. Wharton to Sir Julian Pauncefote. June 4 Same subject: Proposes substitutes for subdivisions 1 and 2 of the British proposal for modus vivendi of June 3; takes exception to subdivision 3, relative to the appointment of consuls, and objects decidedly to condition 4 of the previous assent of Russia; suggests that the navies of both nations enforce the agreement when it is concluded; reply to proposal of June 3. 559
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 6 Same subject: Submits the telegraphic reply to the above note accepting the proposals therein on condition that the British Government be allowed to supervise the execution of the agreement on the islands, and that the prohibition will be extended to the whole of the Bering Sea. Insists that the terms of arbitration [Page LXVIII]and modus be agreed on simultaneously, as the suspension of sealing could not be acceded to another year. 561
Mr. Wharton to bird. Pauncefote. June 6 Same subject: Reply to the above. Objects to the claim of supervision by British authorities of the killing on land which is already supervised by American officials whose integrity is to be upheld, but agrees to the appointment of one or two commissioners for the collection of facts to be placed before the arbitrators. Submits proposal embodying this and other conditions agreed upon. 562
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 8 Same subject: Submits, in reply to the above, an agreement telegraphed from London and containing modifications of and additions to that submitted in said note. 564
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. June 9 Same subject: Reply to the above. Protests against the presenting of new propositions at this time; proceeds to discuss them and submits a form of agreement drafted with slight modifications after that presented on June 6; insists upon the necessity of a speedy settlement. 565
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 10 Same subject: Presents a defense of the motives of Lord Salisbury in introducing new propositions at this time, but says they will probably not be insisted upon except that for a joint commission of four experts to report on the necessity for international arrangements. 567
Same to same June 11 Same subject: Reply has been received by telegraph from Lord Salisbury who regrets that the suggestions in regard to Russia have been rejected, but will authorize him to sign agreement if assurance is given respecting the commission of experts. 568
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. June 11 Same subject: Acknowledges the above and accepts, pending a fuller reply, the terms therein presented. 568
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 13 Same subject: He has received telegraphic permission to sign agreement under previously understood condition as to joint commission. 569
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. June 13 Same subject: Appointment for the formal attestation to the modus vivendi. 569
The President June 15 Same subject: Proclamation in re modus vivendi. 570
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. June 20 Same subject: Instructions issued by the Navy Department in pursuance of the above proclamation. Sir J. Pauncefote is furnished copies thereof and asked for instructions issued by the British Government. 571
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 21 Same subject: Appointment of British commissioners under the agreement announced to visit Pribilof Islands. 573
Sir J. Pauncefote (memorandum). June 23 Same subject: Instructions issued to British naval senior officer stated. Suggestion of indemnity for any act in execution of the modus vivendi submitted. 573
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. June 25 Same subject: Objections of British Government to arbitration proposition No. 6, presented by Mr. Blaine on Dec. 17, 1890. Reply to Lord Salisbury’s note of the 26th of February, 1891, and of Sir J. Pauncefote’s of June 3. The objection of the reference of the question of closed time to arbitration in such words as to attribute abnormal rights to the United States is met by a new proposition avoiding that objection; submits also a final clause in the matter of indemnification by which the interests of the United States as owner of the seal fisheries are not ignored as in the suggestion made in the note of June 3. Agreement in regard to the appointment of commissioners to visit the Pribilof Islands proposed. 574
Same to same June 26 Same subject: Instructions for the reception of the British commissioners at the fisheries transmitted. 575
Same to same June 26 Same subject: Instructions issued to British navy, as per note of the 24th, have been communicated to the Navy Department. 576
[Page LXIX] Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. June 27 Same subject: Note of the 25th acknowledged. 576
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. July 3 Same subject: Commissioners to visit the Bering Sea. Proposes they go and act together. 577
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. July 6 Same subject: Reply to the above. Passage for the British Commissioners has already been arranged for, but they will be instructed to cooperate as much as possible. 577
Same to same July 6 Same subject: Act of Parliament and order in council in pursuance of modus vivendi agreement inclosed. 577
Same to same July 7 Same subject: Instructions (in full) to the naval forces of Great Britain in the Bering Sea inclosed. 583
Mr. Adee to Sir J. Pauncefote. July 8 Same subject: Note of 6th instant, inclosing act of Parliament and order in council, acknowledged. 584
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. July 9 Same subject: Note of 7th and inclosure acknowledged. 584
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. July 13 Same subject: The proposition in regard to indemnification made in the note of June 25 appears to Lord Salisbury to prejudge the question of liability. A form is submitted by which not only the facts but the liability arising from them shall be passed upon by the arbitrators. 585
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. July 23 Same subject: The objection presented in the above note was not anticipated. It is contended that it was made with due regard to Lord Salisbury’s own language and in a spirit of entire equality presents observations in support of that position; but, with a view to removing the last point of difference, the proposition is modified so as to meet the objection made against it. 585
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Aug. 8 Same subject: Indemnities for acts committed by cruisers of either nation. Solicits a reply to the question relating thereto included in the memorandum transmitted with his note of June 23. 587
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. Aug. 17 Same subject: Reply to the above. The President thinks it will be time to consider the question of indemnity when occasion has been given to claim the same. 588
Same to same Aug. 22 Same subject: Requests a reply to his note of July 23. 588
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Aug. 24 Same subject: Regrets his inability to furnish as yet the reply above requested. 588
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 26 Same subject: Your note of 22d. Important letter posted to-day. 589
Same to same (unofficial) Aug. 26 Same subject: The British Government can not accept proposed form in note of July 23, because implying the admission of the doctrine that governments are liable for acts of their nationals. Without leaving the question of damages entirely out, as suggested by Mr. Wharton at one time, a middle course might be adopted, and, omitting the question of liability, questions of fact might be referred to the arbitrators. Submits the wording of the clause drafted on that basis. 589
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Aug. 26 Same subject: The killing of seals is permitted, according to reports received from the Bering Sea Commissioners, to continue, although the number agreed upon, 7,500, is already exceeded, the excuse being that the limitation begins with the signature of the modus vivendi agreement. This Government is convinced the President will not countenance any such evasion of the spirit of said agreement. 590
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. Sept. 2 Same subject: Note of August 26 (above) shall receive immediate attention. 590
Same to same Sept. 7 Same subject: The objection presented in (unofficial) note of August 26 is groundless. The President does not assume liability on the part of Great Britain, but, on the contrary, wishes to put the question of liability to the arbitrators. He can not accept the counter [Page LXX]proposition to submit the question of facts only, as those are well known, and must insist that the question of liability shall go to arbitration. 591
Same to same Oct. 10 Same subject: Alleged killing of seals in excess of number provided for by agreement. A reply to the note of August 26 has been delayed by the necessity of waiting for the United States agent’s report. The agent’s interpretation that the limitation should begin with the signing of the agreement was concurred in by the United States naval officers and the commissioners of both parties; a large number had been killed between that date and that of the receipt of instructions by the agent, leaving then but 3,029 to be taken “for the subsistence and care of the natives” from July 2, 1891, to May 1, 1892, and the agent, seeing that it would be inadequate, called upon the lessees to supply the deficiency with salt meat. 592
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. Oct. 12 Same subject: Delay of ten weeks in replying to the proposal of July 23, for the settlement of claims for damages, is called to Sir Pauncefote’s attention, together with the fact that the modus vivendi expires May 2, 1892. The President feels that if any effective action is to be taken in the matter before the next fishing season opens all the terms of agreement of arbitration should be disposed of immediately. 593
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Oct. 13 Same subject: Reply to the above. Lord Salisbury is expected in London this week; much of the period of ten weeks was taken up in informal discussions. 594
Same to same Oct. 17 Same subject: The British Government insists upon its interpretation of the damage clause as presented in his note of August 26. The same proposition is practically renewed. 594
Mr. Wharton to Sir J. Pauncefote. Oct. 22 Same subject: Regrets the determination reported in the above note and discusses it at some length, but with a view to induce a prompt solution submits a wording of the clause in conformity to the wish that questions of fact only shall be submitted to arbitration, the question of liability being reserved for future negotiations. 595
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Oct. 23 Same subject: Acceptance of the above proposition has been received by telegraph. 597
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Nov. 23 Same subject: States that two reservations are desired in article 6, viz, that the necessity and nature of any regulations are left to the arbitrators, and that such regulations will not become obligatory upon the United States and Great Britain until they have received the assent of the maritime powers. 598
Mr. Blaine to Sir J. Pauncefote. Nov. 27 Same subject: States that within a few days the minister had furnished the exact points that had been agreed upon for arbitration; that he now informs him by his note of the 23d instant that two reservations are desired in the sixth article; that all regulations should be left to the arbitrators, and that they shall be accepted by the other maritime powers before becoming obligatory upon the United States and Great Britain. Such a proposition will postpone the matter indefinitely, and it can not be taken into consideration. There is no objection to submitting it to the maritime powers for their assent, but the United States can not agree to make the adjustment with Great Britain dependent upon the action of third parties, who have no direct interest in the seal fisheries. 599
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Dec. 1 Same subject: States that with regard to the first reservation proposed in his note of 23d ultimo, the statement made in Department note of the 27th ultimo assures the same and it may be put aside. The object of the second reservation was to prevent the fisheries from being put at the mercy of some third power. [Page LXXI]The regulation might be evaded by British and American sealers by simply hoisting the flag of a nonadhering power. Suggests that after the lapse of one year if either government complains that injury is being done to the fisheries it may give notice of a suspension of the regulations. Suggests also that if any dispute arises between the two nations the question in controversy shall be referred to an admiral of each, who may choose an umpire. 600
Mr. Blaine to Sir J. Pauncefote. Dec. 2 Same subject: In reply to note of 1st instant, states that President is unable to see the apprehended danger of a third nation engaging in sealing; no other nation ever has. Russia will not dissent from the agreement because it will endanger her own sealing property. We may look to her to sanction and strengthen it. The two nations, however, should unite in a note to the principal powers advising them of what has been done and asking their approval. If the agreement is disturbed by a third nation Great Britain and United States can act conjointly. It is therefore hoped that arbitration may be allowed to proceed. 600
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Dec. 8 Same subject: States that his Government does not fear that the powers will reject the regulations, but that they will refuse to allow the arrest of their ships which may engage in sealing in violation of the regulations. It is probable that during the close season sealing will go on under other flags. 601
Mr. Blaine to Sir J. Pauncefote. Dec. 10 Same subject: States, in reply to note of 8th instant, that since the dispute began not a vessel of Prance or Germany has ever engaged in sealing; it would be unprofitable for them to sail 20,000 miles to do so. If we wait until they agree that their ships may be searched the last seal will have been taken. Russia is regarded as an ally and no American country will loan its flag. To stop now for outside nations is to indefinitely postpone the whole question. The President adheres to his ground, that we must have the arbitration as already signed. 602
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Dec. 11 Same subject: States that, in view of the strong opinion of the President that the danger apprehended by Lord Salisbury is too remote to justify delay, the British Government will not press the point, explained in his note of the 8th instant, but it reserves the right of raising it when the question of framing the regulations comes before the arbitrators. It is understood that they may attach such conditions to them as they may a priori judge to be necessary and just to the two powers. States that he is authorized to sign the text of the seven articles and of the joint commission article. Will call at Department at any time appointed. 603
Mr. Blaine to Sir J. Pauncefote. Dec. 14 Same subject: In reply to note of 11th instant, states that President objects to Lord Salisbury’s making any reservation at all, and can not yield to him the right to appeal to the arbitrators to decide any point not embraced in the articles; to claim this right is to entirely change the arbitration. The President claims the right to have the seven points arbitrated. The matters to be arbitrated must be distinctly understood before the arbitrators are chosen. Is prepared, to sign the articles without any reservation whatever, and will be glad to have him call at the Department on the 16th, at 11 a.m. 603
Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Dec. 15 Same subject: Will transmit note of 14th instant to his Government. Pending further instructions, it is not in his power to proceed to the signature of the articles. 604
[Page LXXII] Sir J. Pauncefote to Mr. Blame. Dec. 17 Same subject: States in reply to note of 14th instant that Lord Salisbury states that owing to the difficulties of telegraphic communication he has been misunderstood, and will defer discussion as to the course to be followed in case the regulations are evaded by a change of flag. States that no reservation was embodied in his note of the 11th instant, and agrees with the President that no point should be submitted to the arbitrators not embraced in the agreement. Is ready to sign the articles. 604
Same to same Dec. 30 Same subject: Declines to have the number of the arbitrators reduced from seven to five, but prefers that each country should be represented by two and the other three appointed by foreign governments. 606
Same to same 1892. Jan. 16 Same subject: States that Messrs. Baden-Powell and Dawson will arrive on the 29th. 607
Same to same Jan. 21 Same subject: His Government accepts that the arbitrators shall be chosen by France, Italy, and Sweden. 607
Same to same Jan. 30 Same subject: Asks whether Department is prepared to proceed at once to the preparation and signature of the formal arbitration convention and Joint Commission. 607
Mr. Blaine to Sir J. Pauncefote. Feb. 4 Same subject: Inclosing arbitration convention and Joint Commission agreement and states that he is ready to proceed at once to the signature of the convention. 607
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Feb. 4 Same subject: States that commissioners have been appointed to investigate and report, conjointly with British commissioners, upon facts relative to preservation of seal life; will be ready to confer informally with British colleagues at their convenience. 608
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 6 Same subject: Note of February 4 acknowledged. States that Sir Baden-Powell and Prof. Dawson have been appointed commissioners in the matter of the preservation of seal life, and trusts that arrangements will be made at once for the meeting of the commission on Monday, 8th instant. 608
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Feb. 6 Same subject: Regrets that the British commissioners are men who have already publicly expressed an opinion as to the merits of the question, but hopes this will not prevent a fair and impartial investigation. Supposed that before this the arbitration convention would be signed and thus have enabled the commissioners to proceed officially to a discharge of their duties, but as it became necessary to await approval of the draft of the instrument, has interposed no objection to preliminary conferences. 609
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 8 Same subject: Deprecates the intimation that the British commissioners may be biased by previous public expressions of opinion; presents the defense of both of them; remarks that the same observation might be urged in the case of the American commissioners, and expresses satisfaction that the course adopted is in accord with that suggested by him in the note dated April 29, 1890. 610
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Feb. 9 Same subject: The British commissioners, wishing to postpone joint conferences until arbitration convention shall have been signed, the United States commissioners have been instructed to make known their readiness to proceed without further delay, the United States Government regarding the convention as substantially agreed upon. 611
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 11 Same subject: Acknowledges above; makes mention of two preliminary conferences, and says the British commissioners hope to arrange for the formal opening of their session. 612
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Feb. 12 Same subject: Refusal to discuss modus vivendi by the British commissioners: the value of the work of the commission will be diminished thereby. What is the scope of the duties of the British commissioners? 612
[Page LXXIII] Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 13 Same subject: He is awaiting instructions of Lord Salisbury, to whom the draft of arbitration convention inclosed in the note of February 4 has been forwarded. 612
Same to same Feb. 13 Same subject: Expresses the opinion that British commissioners can not discuss the modus vivendi without special authority from their Government. 613
Same to same Feb. 19 Same subject: No opinion can be expressed by the British Government as to the modus vivendi question raised in the interview of the 2d instant, until they know what is proposed. 613
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Feb. 24 Same subject: Urges the necessity of a modus vivendi. The terms should be similar to those of last year, but better executed; asks that the contents of this note be transmitted by telegraph, every day of delay involving great trouble to both Governments. 614
Same to same Feb. 26 Same subject: Sealing schooners are reported by United States consul at Victoria to have cleared to the number of forty-six, with six or seven more to go, as against thirty same date last year. The need of an agreement will soon be over if it is not arrived at soon. 614
Same to same Feb. 27 Same subject: Fixes the 29th as the day on which to sign the treaty of arbitration. 615
Feb. 29 Same subject: Agreement between the United States and Great Britain to arbitrate the questions arising out of the seal fisheries in Bering Sea. 615
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 29 Same subject: Reply to the note of the 24th. Lord Salisbury does not admit that the delays have been greater on the part of Great Britain. The British commissioners have reported that there is no danger of a serious diminution of the seals, and therefore the necessity of a modus vivendi is not apparent. Still he would not object to the prohibition limited to a zone not more than 30 miles around the Pribyloff Islands, provided the catch on the islands be limited to 30,000. The simile of trees would be more appropriate if applied to grass, which, like the seals, will be reproduced next year if cut this year, pending the result of arbitration. 619
Same to same Mar. 7 Same subject: Presents arguments in support of Lord Salisbury’s refusal to accede to another modus vivendi. The first was agreed to (as per note of June 6, 1891) under stipulation that the measure could not be repeated. There is no apparent danger to the seal species. The zone proposed is more extensive than that mentioned by Mr. Blaine on March 16, 1891. The anticipation of conflicts, considered in the note of May 4, 1891, has been met by the provisions of the Bering Sea act of Parliament and order in council. 620
Mr. Wharton to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Mar. 8 Same subject: The President regrets that Great Britain should decline to agree to an effective mode of protecting a property, the title to which is being submitted to arbitration, a course demanded by common equity. The simile of grass cutting refuted. If Great Britain declines, as shown by quotations from previous correspondence, to assume responsibility for acts of her subjects she should restrain the same from committing such acts. The prohibition of seal killing was a matter of comity before arbitration was agreed upon. It is now a matter of obligation. The killing under the restrictions of last year was four times that made on land. It would become enormous in the absence of any restriction. The impracticability of a 30–mile zone, now proposed by Lord Salis bury, was pointed out by himself when the proposal came from this Government. The United States can not be expected to forego protecting its property while the arbitration is proceeding. 621
[Page LXXIV] Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Mar. 19 Same subject: The disinclination of the British Government to agree to the modus vivendi is due to its belief that it is not necessary to prevent an undue diminution of the seal herds and to the fact that a prolonged sitting of the arbitration tribunal would entail heavy losses to the British sealers. 625
Mr. Wharton to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Mar. 22 Same subject: Urges the necessity for a prompt acceptance of a renewal of the last modus vivendi, the only one which the United States will accept, giving reasons therefor, and declares that the President is not willing to be found in any degree responsible for the results that may follow the insistence by either Government upon the extreme rights claimed by it. 625
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Wharton. Mar. 26 Same subject: His Government will agree to the modus vivendi if the tribunal of arbitration is permitted to assess the damages which may have been inflicted to either party in favor of which the decision will be rendered, or, if vessels giving security for such damages are excepted from the prohibition, no restriction being imposed on the sealing on the islands in the latter case. 628
Same to same Mar. 26 Same subject: Submits reference proposed by the British Government on the point of damages to be assessed by the arbitrators. 629
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Apr. 7 Same subject: Submits draft of modus vivendi and expresses the willingness of the President to submit the question of damages to the arbitrators. 629
Same to same Apr. 14 Same subject: Delay of the British Government in replying is a matter of surprise and chagrin to the President, who made his comments on the objections of Lord Salisbury within one hour and a half. The responsibility for serious results can not be charged to the United States. 631
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 14 Same subject: Delay is mainly due to rejection of offered amendments and alteration in one of the articles. The text can not be admitted to be mutually and fully established until the reply of Lord Salisbury, who is absent on the continent, is received. 632
Same to same Apr. 16 Same subject: Incloses, with explanations of the changes proposed, an amended draft of the modus vivendi which he is authorized to sign. 632
Apr. 18 Same subject: Text of the convention between the United States of America and Great Britain for the renewal of the existing modus vivendi in Bering Sea. 635
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Apr. 20 Same subject: Notice of the advice and consent of the Senate to the ratification of the above convention. 637
Same to same Apr. 20 Same subject: Notice of the amendments accompanying the advice and consent of the Senate to the arbitration convention. 637
Lord Salisbury to Sir Julian Pauncefote (telegram). Apr. 23 Same subject: Instructions have been issued to Canadian authorities and naval forces in the Pacific Ocean concerning the renewal of the modus vivendi; the order in council will be issued upon the Queen’s return to England. 638
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Apr. 28 Same subject: Instructions issued by the Navy Department relative to the modus vivendi; requests copies of instructions issued by the British Government. 638
Same to same Apr. 29 Same subject: Acknowledges the receipt of Lord Salisbury’s telegram of April 23. 639
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. May 11 Same subject: Suggests that United States naval officers be allowed the same discretion as the British officers to merely give warning to sealing vessels when found to be acting in ignorance. 639
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 12 Same subject: The instructions already issued can not be modified; sealing vessel’s, when seized will be turned over to the British naval officer at Unalaska, with whom the responsibility of releasing them will rest. 640
[Page LXXV] Mr. Wharton to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 21 Same subject: The release adverted to in the above note is not to be understood to be with the approval of the Government of the United States, which holds that all vessels seized should undergo trial. Adverts to the fact that all the seizures last year were by United States cruisers, and that the vessels seized were eventually released without action. 640
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. June 2 Same subject: instructions issued to British naval officers in regard to the enforcement of the modus vivendi. 641
Mr. Wharton to Sir Julian Pauncefote. June 6 Same subject: Acknowledges the above 642
Mr. Herbert to Mr. Wharton. June 15 Same subject: Submits form of identic note to be presented to the Government of Prance, Italy, and Sweden for the appointment of arbitrators. 642
Mr. Adee to Mr. Herbert June 16 Same subject: Accepts the form of the identic note submitted above. 643

hawaii.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
16 Mr. Stevens to Mr. Blaine 1891. Feb. 5 Death of King Kalakaua: Honors paid to the remains; accession of Queen Liliuokalani to the throne. 644
18 Same to same Feb. 9 Same subject: Resolutions adopted by a meeting, of Hawaiian citizens expressing gratitude for the courtesy of the Government and people of the United States, and reply of the United States minister. 645
19 Same to same Feb. 16 Same subject: Resolutions passed by the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce. 646
15 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Stevens. Feb. 28 Same subject: Acknowledges the receipt of Nos. 16 and 18 and pays tribute to the memory of the late King. 647
21 Mr. Stevens to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 26 Same subject: Incloses acknowledgment of the Hawaiian minister for foreign affairs. 648

correspondence with the hawaiian legation at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Carter to Mr. Blaine 1891. Jan. 6 Visit of King Kalakaua: Transmits the thanks of His Majesty for the attentions paid him. 648
Same to same Jan. 21 Death of King Kalakaua: Gives notice of the, at San Francisco, on January 20. 649
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Carter Jan. 21 Same subject: Conveys the heartfelt sympathy of the President. 649

haiti.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
89 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass 1891. Jan. 9 Detention of sailing vessels after their cargoes are discharged until the duties are paid: Incloses complaint of Messrs. G. A. Brett, Son & Co., of New York, and directs the legation to obtain the removal or modification of such restrictions. 650
120 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine Jan. 26 Same subject: Reports his interview with the minister for foreign affairs and his promise to give the matter due consideration. 651
127 Same to same Feb. 9 Same subject: Reports further interview with the minister for foreign affairs in company with Rear-Admiral Gherardi, U. S. Navy. 651
97 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass. Feb. 13 Same subject: Directs him to keep the matter in view. 652
99 Same to same Feb. 27 Same subject: Acknowledges No. 127, above, and approves his insistence. 653
105 Same to same Mar. 11 Same subject: Incloses a letter from Messrs. G. A. Brett, Son & Co., giving details as to one case as an example of the hardships imposed. Discusses the subject, which should receive instant attention. 653
[Page LXXVI]151 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine Apr. 17 Same subject: The matter will be made the subject of a special recommendation to Congress in President Hippolyte’s forthcoming message. 654
157 Same to same Apr. 27 Same subject: Transmits notes exchanged with the minister for foreign affairs and the expectation that the law or decree, the cause of complaint, will shortly be satisfactorily modified. 655
116 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Douglass May 16 Same subject: Acknowledges, with gratification, the receipt of dispatch No. 157, above. 656
179 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine. June 27 Same subject: Transmits passage of President Hippolyte’s message referred to in dispatch No. 151, above. 656
128 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Terres July 14 Same subject: Expresses the hope that the question will be speedily and satisfactorily settled, as indicated in dispatch No. 179. 657

italy.

Correspondence in relation to the killing of prisoners in New Orleans, March 14, 1891.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Blaine to Governor Nicholls (telegram). 1890. Oct. 21 Representations of the Italian minister at Washington against the action of the mayor of New Orleans upon the murder of the chief of police transmitted. 658
Governor Nicholls to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 28 Reply to the above: No trouble apprehended 658
Mr. Adee to Baron Fava Oct. 29 Transmits the above. 658
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Nov. 18 Incloses the letter of the Italian consul at New Orleans to the grand jury of New Orleans in regard to the ill treatment and extortions suffered by the Italian subjects arrested on the charge of murdering the chief of police, and requests the intervention of the United States Government. 659
Mr. Blaine to Governor Nichols. Nov. 21 Transmits for his consideration the letter of the Italian consul. 660
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Nov. 29 Instructions received by the legation from the Italian Government in relation to the right of Italian residents to protection and to the reported action of the mayor of New Orleans. 661
Governor Nicholls to Mr. Blaine. Dec. 2 Reports that indictments have been brought in against two prison officials for acts of brutality against prisoners, in consequence of the investigation made upon the letter of the Italian consul to the grand jury. 662
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Miller Dec. 4 Inquiry as to citizenship of the persons under indictment at New Orleans. 662
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava Dec. 9 Transmits the substance of Governor Nicholls’s letter of December 2, above. 662
Mr. Blaine to Governor Nicholls. Dec. 9 Acknowledges the receipt of his letter of December 2. 663
Mr. Miller to Mr. Blaine Dec. 20 List (1) of prisoners registered as voters, and (2) of those whose status is unknown, transmitted. 663
Consul Corte to Baron Fava (telegram). 1891. Mar. 14 Killing of the prisoners reported 665
Marquis Rudini to Baron Fava (telegram). Mar, 14 Instructions to request immediate steps to protect the Italian colony and to punish the guilty. 665
Same to same (telegram) Mar. 15 Instructions to present formal protest in the event of the slightest agitation. 665
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 15 Formal protest in conformity to the two telegrams above. 666
Mr. Blaine to Governor Nicholls (telegram). Mar. 15 Requests his coöperation in maintaining treaty obligations and bringing the offenders to justice. Expresses the President’s regret that a question which should have been adjudged by settled rules of law was transferred to the passionate judgment of a mob. 666
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava Mar. 15 Transmits a copy of the above 667
Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Mar. 15 Reports the effects of the news from New Orleans. 667
[Page LXXVII] Mr. Blaine to Mr. Porter (telegram). Mar. 15 Instructions to deliver to the foreign office a copy of the telegram to Governor Nicholls of March 15. 667
Governor Nicholls to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Mar. 16 Promises a reply by mail to the telegram of March 15; no further trouble to be anticipated; the nationality of the victims no factor in the disturbance. 668
175 Mr. Porter to Mr. Blaine Mar. 16 Confirms Mr. Whitehouse’s telegram of March 15, which was sent at the request of the foreign office; reports his visit to Minister di Rudini on the occasion of the killing. 668
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Mar. 18 Incloses report of the occurrence by the Italian consul, which, in his opinion, shows the conduct of the local authorities to be censurable. 668
Marquis Imperiali to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 19 Incloses telegram from the Italian Government demanding official notice of the killing and reparation therefor. 670
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Mar. 21 Urges that satisfaction may be given before he is called upon to write an official note covering the reparation looked to in an inclosed telegram from the Italian minister for foreign affairs. 671
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava. Mar. 21 Repeats the request, previously made verbally, for information concerning the three victims alleged to be Italian subjects, asserting that the others are not entitled to the protection of the Italian Government. 671
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 21 Expects to receive the information above called for on the following day. 672
Governor Nicholls to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 21 In reply to the telegram of March 15, states that the trouble is terminated and that the grand jury has been charged in regard to the matter. 672
Marquis Rudini to Baron Fava (telegram). Mar. 24 Satisfaction expected consists in the punishment of the murderers and indemnity for the victims; if not granted, the minister will be recalled. 673
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 25 Incloses telegram from Marquis Rudini demanding immediate solution. 673
Same to same Mar. 25 Report of the Italian consul furnishing information as to four of the victims who are claimed to be Italian subjects, and five others who are not believed to be American citizens under the Constitution. 673
Same to same Mar. 26 Requests an immediate answer to Marquis Rudini’s telegram of March 24. 674
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Porter (telegram). Mar. 29 Instructions to explain to the Italian Government the dual character of the Government of the United States, as well as the necessity of a previous thorough investigation. 675
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 31 Notice of his departure from, the legation in consequence of the refusal of the United States Government to take the demands of the Italian Government into consideration. Marquis Imperiali, secretary of the legation, to be left in charge of the current business of the same. 675
Mr. Blaine to Marquis Imperiali. Apr. 1 Regrets the departure of Baron Fava; disputes the reasons assigned, pointing to a change of language used in his last note, and contending, first, that no assurance of punishment conld be given even if the National Government had entire jurisdiction, and denying that an indemnity has been refused; a thorough investigation only was insisted upon. 676
Mr. Porter to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Apr. 1 The Italian Government insists upon being given an assurance that every effort would be made without delay to bring the offenders to justice. 677
180 Same to same Apr. 1 Report of his interview with the under secretary, referred to above. 678
Marquis Imperiali to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 2 The Italian Government merely claimed the prompt institution of criminal proceedings against the offenders, but will not consider the incident closed until a formal declaration is received that such proceedings shall be promptly begun. 679
[Page LXXVIII] Mr. Blaine to Governor Nichols (telegram). Apr. 3 Requests names of the four Italians claimed as subjects of the King, and their history previous to their arrival in the United States. 679
Governor Nichols to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 3 Only three, in his opinion, are Italian subjects; names and information given. 680
Same to same Apr. 3 Certificate from the registrar of voters concerning the men charged with the murder of the chief of police; list of all the accused. 680
181 Mr. Porter to Mr. Blaine Apr. 3 Interview with the minister of foreign affairs, Marquis de Rudini. 681
Mr. Blaine to Marquis Imperials Apr. 14 Brings the original demand for punishment in contrast with the terms of the note of April 2, above, denies that it has been recognized that an indemnity was due, quotes and discusses the precedent of the demand of indemnity made by Spain in 1851, under the administration of Secretary of State, Daniel Webster, and maps out the contemplated action of the Government of the United States in the present instance. 682
Mr. Miller to Mr. Blaine Apr. 28 Report of the district attorney at New Orleans touching citizenship of the victims, inclosing indictments by the grand jury, affidavits of residents of Louisiana, exhibits of threats by the “Mafia,” etc.
There is no statute under which the mobbing can be prosecuted in the Federal courts.
686
Marquis Rudini to Marquis Imperiali (telegram published in the newspapers May 4, 1891). Presents to the Italian chargé d’affaires exclusively the views of his Government on the note of Mr. Blaine of April 14, and instructs him to restrict himself to dealing with current business. 712
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Porter (telegram). May 4 With reference to a statement in the above incloses fac-similes of the original telegram of Marquis Rudini to the legation, in which punishment of the guilty was demanded. 713
Mr. Adee to Mr. Miller May 18 Requests, for publication, the report of the grand jury upon the question of indicting the persons charged with the killing of the prisoners. 713
Mr. Miller to Mr. Adee May 19 Report of the grand jury, reviewing the unlawful tampering with the jury and other circumstances attending the trial of the murderers of the chief of police, and finding no reasons for presenting indictments in the matter of the killing of the prisoners, accompanied by the report of the committee of fifty citizens on the existence of secret societies in New Orleans. 714
Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 21 Hog products. Readmission of, when accompanied by health certificate. Live hogs still excluded. 727
Mr. Blaine to Marquis Imperiali. Apr. 12 Tender of a sum of 125,000 francs to be distributed by the Government of Italy among the families of the victims of the killing at New Orleans. 727
Marquis Imperiali to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 12 Accepts the sum tendered and declares the diplomatic relations reëstablished between the two Governments. 728

netherlands.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
257 Mr. Thayer to Mr. Blaine 1891. Aug. 31 Medals, commemorative of the independence of the United States; description of, five sets of copies of which are transmitted to the Department of State. 729
124 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Thayer Nov. 9 Same subject: Conveys the thanks of the Department. 730
[Page LXXIX]

russia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
64 Mr. Smith to Mr. Blaine 1890. Dec. 23 Church (British-American) of St. Petersburg: Jubilee of the, was attended by the Russian prime minister; incloses newspaper account of the ceremonies. 732
75 Same to same 1891. Feb. 10 Jews, proscription of: Reports an interview with the minister for foreign affairs in relation to alleged measures contemplated by the Imperial Government. 734
78 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Smith Feb. 18 Same subject: With reference to the House resolution of August 20, views the question in its bearing upon the immigration from Russia to the united States, and calls attention to the result of the Russian policy on the rest of the world. 737
78bis Same to same Feb. 27 Same subject: Acknowledges No. 75, and notes with satisfaction the appreciation of the interests and sentiments of other people disclosed by the minister for foreign affairs. 740
79 Mr. Smith to Mr. Blaine Feb. 28 Same subject: Reports the result of his inquiries into the matter. 740
81 Same to same Mar. 12 Same subject: Instruction No. 78 has been submitted to the minister for foreign affairs, who promised to refer it to the Emperor. 741
89 Same to same Apr. 20 Same subject: Reports the expulsion or voluntary departure of Jewish families under the application of existing laws. 742
92 Mr. Wurts to Mr. Blaine Apr. 27 Same subject: Incloses ukase prohibiting the emigration of certain categories of Israelites from the zone assigned to them, and there immigrating or staying in the province of Moscow. 743
119 Mr. Smith to Mr. Wharton Oct. 20 Same subject: Progress and prospects of Baron Hirsch’s colonization scheme. Increase of emigration under the sterner enforcement of old anti-Semitic laws. 744
120 Same to same. Oct. 22 Famine in Russia: Estimates of the extent of the calamity as found in the Journal de St. Petersburg. 746
121 Same to same Oct 30 Same subject: Measures taken and appropriations made to meat the needs of the sufferers. 747

turkey.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
246 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine 1891. Mar. 18 American school at Agantz: Reports its closing by local authorities in violation of the vizirial orders of 1889 and the sending of orders for its reopening. 749
284 Same to same May 7 Right of Americans to buy and hold lands in Turkey: Reports the conditions sought to be imposed by local authorities and subsequently removed by the Porte upon the representations of the legation. 750
217 Mr. Adee to Mr. Hirsch May 25 Same subject: Acknowledges the above and expresses satisfaction therefor. 751
312 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine June 17 Citizenship of a naturalized citizen who “for expediency” resumed his Turkish allegiance: Returns the certificate of naturalization of Kiragos Dondjian, who intends to resume his American citizenship. 751
236 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Hirsch July 10 Same subject: Mr. Dondjian has, by his act, forfeited his American citizenship, and can not recover it except through the regular course open to all other aliens. 752
245 Mr. Wharton to Mr. McNutt. Sept. 3 Missionary troubles: Instructions to report concerning certain indignities said to have been perpetrated at Erzerum on Rev. Mr. Richardson complained of by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. 753
344 Mr. McNutt to Mr. Blaine Sept. 10 Schools and churches: Incloses note from the Porte to the effect that all buildings which are turned into such schools and churches without authorization will be returned to their original destination, and draft of his reply in vindication of the rights of foreigners to affect their dwellings to private meetings of any character. 755
[Page LXXX]347 Mr. McNutt to Mr. Blaine Sept. 26 Missionary troubles: In reply to instructions No. 245, above, refers to the unsettled condition of the country where Erzerum lies, and mentions the advisability of having a consular representative there. 756
249 Mr. Wharton to Mr. McNutt. Oct. 1 Schools and churches: Approves with certain modifications, the purport of the note, the draft of which was submitted in No. 344 above. 757
250 Same to same Oct. 17 Circulation and sale of books: Refers to Mr. Hirsch’s No. 104 of March 31, 1890, and instructs him to seek immediate redress against the abusive interference of local authorities in this connection. 758
354 Mr. McNutt to Mr. Blaine Oct. 22 Missionary trouble at Erzerum: Incloses report of British consul at Erzerum of the detention of Rev. Mr. Richardson on account of his being unable to present a passport, which had been taken from him. A new passport was sent to Mr. Richardson by the legation. 760
356 Same to same Oct. 28 Same subject: Incloses statement of Rev. Mr. Richardson. 762
254 Mr. Blaine to Mr. McNutt Nov. 5 Same subject: Instructions to secure and send to Rev. Mr. Richardson by special messenger, the required traveling permit. 764
263 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch Dec. 14 Schools and churches: Conversion of private buildings into. Supplements instructions No. 249, above, by insisting upon the rights of foreigners, sanctioned by treaty and usage, to use their buildings for all legitimate purposes without being submitted to harsh or unusual conditions. 765