List of papers with an analysis of their contents.

argentine republic.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
25 Mr. Pitkin to Mr. Blaine 1890. Jan. 10 Commerce between the United States and the Argentine Republic: Interview of 9th instant with Minister Zeballos, who expressed the readiness of the Argentine Government to coöperate with that of the United States in strengthening the commercial ties between the two Republics. 1
48 Same to same Apr. 19 Passports: Asks for certain instructions with regard to the issuing of. 1
52 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pitkin May 26 Passports: Gives the instructions requested in Mr. Pitkin’s No. 48, of April 19. 3

austria-hungary.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
57 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine 1890. Jan. 18 Imprisonment of Frank Xavier Fischer, a naturalized citizen of the United States, at Wolfurt, Austria, August 21, 1889, as liable to military duty: Incloses a note of the 15th instant from the ministry of foreign affairs, in reply to his note of October 5, 1889, stating that Fischer had been questioned by the police as to his liability to military duty, and, as he did not prove his American citizenship, he had to be placed in confinement in order to prevent his escape, but that he was released on the following morning on the production of his passport. The officials concerned in the arrest had been reprimanded. 4
45 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Grant Feb. 11 Imprisonment of Frank Xavier Fischer: Instructions to point out to the foreign office that the local authorities at Wolfurt should have made an investigation as to whether Fiseher had violated their laws before arresting him, as, by such a course, such regrettable occurrences, involving violent and unnecessary interference with the liberty of an American citizen, in contravention of treaty, might be averted. Reply to Mr. Grant’s No. 57, of January 18, 1890. 5
63 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine Feb. 24 Passports: Asks for detailed instructions with regard to the issuing of; incloses the application of Bela Washington Fornét for a passport. 6
67 Same to same Mar. 11 Expulsion of Hugo Klamer, a naturalized American citizen of Austrian birth, from Austria-Hungary: Incloses a copy of a note of the 5th instant from the foreign office, in reply to his note of November 12, 1889, reviewing the circumstances connected with Klamer’s expulsion, and contending that the treaty of September 20, 1870, does not deprive the Austro-Hungarian Government of the right to issue a decree of expulsion against any foreigner whose stay in the country may be considered as inconsistent with the public peace. 9
51 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Grant Mar. 25 Passports: Gives the instructions asked in Mr. Grant’s No. 63 of February 24, 1890, relative to passports; authorizes him, under certain conditions, to issue a passport to Bela Washington Fornét; incloses copies of the new form of application for passports. 11
[Page XXXIV]81 Mr. Grant to Mr. Blaine May 12 Imprisonment of Frank Xavier Fischer: Incloses a copy of his note of March 19, 1890, to the minister of foreign affairs, and a translation of the reply, dated the 4th instant, stating that the district captaincy at Bregenz had been reprimanded, and expressing regrets for the unjustifiable arrest of Fischer. 14
59 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Grant May 16 Expulsion of Hugo Klamer from Austria-Hungary: Baron Passetti’s note of March 5 affords no reason for a change in the Department’s opinion that the expulsion of Klamer was unjustifiable; reply to Mr. Grant’s No. 67 of March 11, 1890. 15

brazil.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
26 Mr. Adams to Mr. Blaine 1889. Dec. 17 Political situation: Incloses a translation of a decree of the 3d instant, nominating a commission to draft a constitution. 16
30 Same to same Dec. 28 Political situation: Incloses a translation of a speech of the minister of agriculture, of a decree banishing certain citizens, of a decree ordering military trials, and of a decree revoking the grant made to the Emperor. 16
36 Same to same 1890. Jan. 10 Political situation: Incloses a translation of a decree creating two vice presidents, and of a decree separating the church from the state. 20
1 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lee Feb. 26 Legation: Incloses Mr. Lee’s credentials as chargé d’affaires ad interim and an authenticated copy of the joint resolution of Congress, approved on the 19th instant, congratulating the people of Brazil on the peaceful establishment of the Republic, for presentation to the President of Brazil. 21
56 Mr. Lee to Mr. Blaine Apr. 2 Congratulations of Congress to the Brazilian people presented to the President on the 1st instant. Incloses copies of speeches, and a translation of a press article describing the audience. 22
9 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Conger Dec. 3 Courtesies shown to the officers of the Brazilian squadron which arrived at New York November 25 and left December 12. 23

central america.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). 1890. June 23 Salvador: Reported revolution on the 22d instant. The President and others assassinated. 28
114 Same to same June 25 Salvador: General Ezeta proclaimed provisional president. Guatemala will not recognize the new government, and is moving troops towards the frontier. 28
117 Same to same July 2 Salvador and Guatemala: Martial law declared in the departments of Guatemala adjoining Salvador. The armies of the two countries confronting each other on the frontier and a battle imminent. Incloses a copy and translation of proclamation issued by the President of Guatemala June 27, denouncing the revolution in Salvador. 29
Same to same (telegram) July 8 Salvador and Guatemala: War imminent. The presence of a United States naval vessel on the Pacific coast of Central America necessary. 31
119 Same to same July 9 Salvador and Guatemala: Confirms telegram of 8th instant. Urges the importance of sending a war vessel. Envoy from Salvador in Guatemala. The Guatemalan Government refuses to receive him. Describes the military situation. 31
128 Mr. Adee to Mr. Mizner July 14 Protection to American interests: The Secretary of the Navy has ordered two ships of war to the coast of Salvador and Guatemala. 32
[Page XXXV] Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram) July 16 Arms for Salvador on the Pacific Mail steamer Colima expected to arrive at San José de Guatemala on the 7th instant. The Guatemalan Government wishes that of the United States to cause the steamer to carry the arms beyond Salvador and land them in a neutral state. The Colima is detained until the 20th instant. Requests immediate instructions. 32
120 Same to same July 16 Salvador and Guatemala: Armies of 14,000 men each confronting each other. Confirms his telgram of this date. The Guatemalan Government threatens to declare war in time to seize the arms on the Colima as contraband of war. The Colima will be detained until the 20th instant. 33
Mr. Adee to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 19 Interception of telegrams: Efforts made to communicate with minister. 34
Same to same (telegram) July 19 Colima: The Department has been informed of the detention of the Colima by the Guatemalan Government and of the seizure of the arms. As war had not been declared, Guatemala detains the arms at her own risk, and steamer must be released without delay. United States can not be a party to any conference in which Salvador does not participate. 34
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 20 Colima: Instructions to demand the instant surrender of the Colima, with all her cargo. 35
Mr. Adee to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 21 Seizure of the steam launch of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company at San José by the Guatemalan Government reported. 35
Same to same (telegram) July 21 Colima: The Guatemalan Government has confiscated the arms on board. Instructions to protest and to demand restoration. 35
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 22 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Rumored defeat of the Guatemalan army. Has not heard from the Department for 2 weeks. Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica—Honduras consenting by telegraph—have signed a treaty securing constitutional government in Salvador and request the good offices and moral support of the United States. Asks for a man-of-war. 35
124 Same to same July 23 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Defeat and retreat of the Guatemalan army. Martial law declared throughout Guatemala on the 21st instant. All men between 18 and 50 required to present themselves for military duty. Export duty on coffee raised to $2 per 100 pounds. Duties on imports raised. War formally declared by Guatemala against Salvador. Confirms his telegram of the 22d instant. Asks for a man-of-war. Incloses the Spanish text of the treaty between Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Honduras, of the 19th instant. 36
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 25 Interception of telegrams: The Department has sent Mr. Mizner five telegrams. 39
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 26 Interception of telegrams: Instructions to demand an immediate investigation, and inviolability of his official correspondence. 39
Same to same (telegram) July 26 Good offices: Instructions to tender the good offices of the United States for the friendly adjustment of all the differences among the states of Central America. 39
125 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine July 26 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Incloses a copy and translation of a decree issued by the President of Guatemala on the 21st instant, declaring war against Salvador. 40
126 Same to same July 28 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Violation of a positive agreement made by him on the 18th instant with the Guatemalan Government that they should be stored with the United States consular agent at San José or sent to a neutral port. They were seized while being transferred from the Colima, going south, to the City of Sidney, going north. 40
Same to same (telegram) July 29 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Both armies resting after many engagements. 41
129 Same to same July 31 Interception of telegrams: Reports how he received four telegrams from the Department. 41
[Page XXXVI]130 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine July 31 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Describes the situation. Has tendered the good offices of the United States to the President of Guatemala. They were declined. 41
131 Same to same July 31 Protection to American interests: Arrival of the U. S. S. Ranger and the U. S. S. Thetis at San José on the 28th instant. 43
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). July 31 Good offices: Instructions to proceed immediaety to San José de Guatemala and there to await further instructions. 43
Same to same (telegram) July 31 Good offices: Instructions to use his good offices with the Governments of Guatemala and Salvador for the restoration of peace, securing communication with Salvador by means of the Ranger or Thetis. 43
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 1 Good offices: Gives reasons why it is inexpedient for him to go to San José. 44
142 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Aug. 2 War between Salvador and Guatemala: President Barillas’s proclamation received. 44
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 4 Good offices: Department considers it necessary for him to go to San José and place himself in communication with the Government of Salvador through the Ranger and the Thetis. 44
132 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Aug. 4 Good offices: Incloses copies and translations of speeches made at the reception of the Costa Rican minister accredited on a special mission of peace to Guatemala and Salvador by the President of Guatemala on the 16th of July. 45
133 Same to same Aug. 4 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Gives details and incloses copies of correspondence with the Guatemalan Government on the subject. 47
134 Same to same Aug. 4 Good offices: Incloses copies and translations of correspondence between Nicaraguan minister to Guatemala and the Guatemalan Government, and a communication of July 30 from the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan ministers to Guatemala to the Provisional President of Salvador, in the interests of peace. 50
135 Same to same Aug. 5 Good offices: Gives reasons for assuming that the Department wishes him to go to La Libertad, instead of San José. Will go to La Libertad on the Thetis. 53
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 5 War between Salvador and Guatemala: General Ezeta declines the good offices of the United States and declares his intention to hoist his flag in the city of Guatemala. 54
143 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Aug. 5 Seizure of arms on the Colima by the Guatemalan Government: Incloses copies of communications received by the Department of State from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. 54
144 Same to same Aug. 6 Interception of telegrams: States that Guatemala could communicate with its minister in Mexico. 61
145 Same to same Aug. 6 Good offices: Incloses copies of the Department’s telegrams to him in relation to the tender of the good offices of the United States between Salvador and Guatemala; also copies of telegrams exchanged between the Department and the United States legation in Mexico regarding the proposal of the Mexican Government to act either jointly or concurrently with the United States in the interest of peace between Salvador and Guatemala. The United States Government respects the independent sovereign rights of each commonwealth, and can not countenance forcible interference from any quarter. 61
146 Same to same Aug. 6 Interception of telegrams: Instructions to investigate the causes of the delay in receiving telegrams, and to report on the subject. 62
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 7 Interception of telegrams: General Guirola has telegraphed that messages from Department to Mr. Mizner are not detained in Salvador; detention must consequently be in Guatemala. 63
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 8 Attack upon the United States consulate in San Salvador: Telegram of this date received; asks for a full report. Instructions to notify the Government of Salvador that unless the rights of the Government and citizens of the United States are respected the President will be compelled to devise measures for their enforcement. Directs him, if necessary, to proceed to San Salvador and demand that the consul be reinstated and protected. 64
[Page XXXVII] Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 8 Attack upon the United States consulate in San Salvador: During a battle in the city of San Salvador, General Ezeta’s forces seized the United States consulate, hauled down the flag, and damaged and destroyed property; has demanded immediate reparation. A firmer attitude is needed towards Guatemala and Salvador. Asks for an increase of the naval force in Central American waters. 64
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 9 Attack upon the United States consulate in San Salvador: Has received Mr. Blaine’s telegram of the 9th instant. The reparation demanded on the 8th instant is promised for the 10th. Will go to San Salvador on the 10th instant. 64
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 11 Attack upon the United States consulate in San Salvador: In accordance with his demand, the Government of Salvador, on the 10th instant, hoisted the United States flag over the consulate, fired a salute of 21 guns, reinstated the consul in his office, and guarantied his rights. The minister of foreign affairs has written him an adequate letter of apology. 64
149 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Aug. 11 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 7th instant, and inclosures, from the president of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. 65
150 Same to same Aug. 11 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Incloses dispatch No. 350 from the United States minister in Mexico. 73
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 12 Attack on the United States consulate at San Salvador: Instructions to express the gratification of the United States Government at the reparation made. 73
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 12 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Peace suggested by Salvador on the basis of nonintervention. Armies quiet and in camp. 73
139 Same to same Aug. 15 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Reports his return to Guatemala from San Salvador on the 14th instant. 73
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). Aug. 15 Good offices between Salvador and Guatemala: Glad to welcome Mexico’s disposition toward establishment of peace. 74
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 16 Good offices of the United States have been accepted by both belligerents. 74
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 18 Peace negotiations: Bases of peace accepted by the ministers of both belligerents, subject to approval by the respective Presidents. 74
141 Same to same Aug. 18 Attack upon the United States consulate at San Salvador: Gives details and incloses documents. 75
155 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Aug. 19 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Department awaits further particulars. 79
144 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Aug. 20 Interception of telegrams: Is investigating the causes of delay in their delivery. 79
145 Same to same Aug. 20 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Gives an account of the battle of July 30 and 31, in the city of San Salvador, between the forces of General Rivas and Gen. Antonio Ezeta. 79
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 21 Seizure of arms on the Colima: The Guatemalan Government requires the official who seized the arms to return them with a written apology. He has reserved all claims for damages. 80
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 25 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Salvador does not agree to the bases of peace. The armistice extended 4 days. 81
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). Aug. 25 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Instructs him to telegraph Mr. Mizner to suggest arbitration. 81
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 27 War between Salvador and Guatemala: The bases of peace have been modified and accepted by both parties. 81
147 Same to same Aug. 27 Good offices: Acknowledges telegram of 15th instant. As peace has been agreed upon, supposes that further action may be suspended. 82
148 Same to same Aug. 28 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Acknowledges telegram of 25th instant. As the bases of peace have been signed, action with regard to arbitration is unnecessary. 82
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 28 Killing of Gen. J. M. Barrundia on board the American steamer Acapulco at San José de Guatemala by the Guatemalan officials: Reports [Page XXXVIII]the killing of General Barrundia this day while resisting arrest. He had guaranties for the safety of Barrundia, and united with the United States consul-general in advising the captain of the Acapulco to permit the arrest. 82
150 Same to same Aug. 29 Killing of Gen. J. M. Barrundia: Makes a report and incloses copies of documents on the subject. 83
243 Mr. Hosmer to Mr. Wharton Aug. 29 Killing of Gen. J. M. Barrundia: Makes a report and incloses copies of document on the subject. 86
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). Aug. 30 Killing of General Barrundia: Regrets that Mr. Mizner advised or consented to the surrender of Barrundia. Barrundia placed himself within the jurisdiction of Guatemala at his own peril, and it was for the authorities of Guatemala to assume jurisdiction at their own risk. 90
Same to same (telegram) Sept. 2 Killing of General Barrundia: Mr. Mizner’s telegram of the 1st instant received. Repeats his own telegram of August 30. 90
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 3 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Both armies have been withdrawn from the frontier and are being rapidly disbanded. 90
151 Same to same Sept. 3 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Gives an account of the peace negotiations and incloses copies and translations of documents. 90
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). Sept. 3 Killing of General Barrundia: Instructs him to make a full report on the subject. 96
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 4 Killing of General Barrundia: Gives his reasons for consenting to Barrundia’s arrest. Has sent a full report. 96
158 Same to same Sept. 9 Killing of General Barrundia: Acknowledges telegram of 3d instant. Sent a full report in his No. 150. 96
159 Same to same Sept. 10 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Gives further details. The arms were returned on the 31st ultimo. Incloses copies of documents. 97
160 Same to same Sept. 10 Interception of telegrams: Copies of all telegrams to and from the various legations in Guatemala are inspected by the Government. Has not received Department’s telegram of July 20. 100
161 Same to same Sept. 10 War between Salvador and Guatemala: The armies have been reduced to a peace footing. Peace will be declared in a few days. 100
170 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Sept. 10 Attack on the United States consulate at San Salvador: Consul Myers will be instructed to furnish a statement of the damage done to his own property and to that of the consulate. 101
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 11 War between Salvador and Guatemala: The bases of peace have been complied with, the armies have been disbanded, and the presence of the men-of-war is no longer required. 101
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner (telegram). Sept. 12 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Instructions to express the earnest wishes of the United States Government for continued friendliness between Guatemala and Salvador. 101
Mr. Tracy to Mr. Blaine Sept. 13 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Incloses a copy of a letter of August 28, 1890, from the commander of the U. S. S. Ranger, announcing the acceptance of the terms of peace by Guatemala and Salvador. Seizure of arms on the Colima. The same letter reports the return of the arms by the Guatemalan Government. Killing of General Barrundia. The same letter gives details regarding the killing of General Barrundia. 101
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 14 Salvador: General Carlos Ezeta has been unanimously elected constitutional President. 104
174 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Sept. 15 Good offices: Has received his No. 147, of the 27th ultimo. 104
165 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Sept. 17 Killing of General Barrundia: Has sent Mr. Hosmer to San José to take the affidavit of the captain of the Acapulco. 105
177 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Mizner. Sept. 18 Attack on the United States consulate at San Salvador: Instructs him to investigate the truth of certain allegations of Consul Myers. 105
170 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Sept. 21 War between Salvador and Guatemala: Peace and order reign in Guatemala. 106
Same to same Sept. 23 Killing of General Barrundia: Gives further details and incloses documents on the subject. 106
172 Same to same Sept. 24 Martial law was abolished in Guatemala on the 22d instant. 113
[Page XXXIX]174 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Sept. 24 Good offices between Salvador and Guatemala: Both states consider the United States as having been chiefly instrumental in the peace settlement. 113
186 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Mizner Sept. 29 Interception of telegrams: Incloses the text of Department’s telegram of July 20. Instructs him to ascertain why it did not reach him. 113
188 Same to same Oct. 2 Interception of telegrams: The director of telegraphs of Salvador states that Department’s telegram of July 20 was forwarded to Mr. Mizner via Honduras. 114
189 Same to same Oct. 6 Attack on the United States consulate at San Salvador: Incloses a letter of September 27, 1890, from Consul Myers, with accompanying documents giving details. 115
Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Oct. 6 Salvador: Has forwarded by mail General Ezeta’s letter to the President of the United States announcing his election as constitutional President of Salvador. 117
179 Same to same Oct. 8 Good offices: Gives details with regard to the negotiation of a treaty of peace between Salvador and Guatemala. 117
187 Same to same Oct. 18 Interception of telegrams: Has requested the cable operator at La Libertad to send him a written statement of the control exercised over his office by the authorities of Salvador in July, August, and September, 1890. Asks for a copy of the disclaimer of the Government of Salvador. 118
188 Same to same Oct. 18 Attack upon the United States consulate at San Salvador: Will communicate with the Salvadorian Government with regard to its refusal to give Consul Myers a pass to leave the country. 119
197 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Mizner Oct. 21 Interception of telegrams: Instructs him to protest against the continued interruption of mercantile correspondence by means of the cable via La Libertad. Incloses copies of two dispatches from the United States vice-consul at Tegucigalpa on the subject. 119
193 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Oct. 24 Interception of telegrams: He has the certificate of the receiving clerk at the central office of the telegraph company, in Guatemala, that Department’s telegram of July 20 was never received at his office, the only one having telegraphic connection with Honduras. 121
197 Same to same Oct. 29 War between Salvador and Guatemala: The special minister of Salvador to negotiate the treaty of peace with Guatemala was received by the President of Guatemala on the 20th instant. 121
203 Same to same Nov. 10 Interception of telegrams: The officer who was in charge of the cable at La Libertad in July, August, and September, 1890, states that it is a part of the contract between the cable company and the Government of Salvador that the latter should have supervision of the correspondence, and that, during the late war, in July and August, the authorities of Salvador placed a guard of soldiers over the cable office at La Libertad, controlling its business. 122
203 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Mizner Nov. 14 Interception of telegrams: Incloses a copy of General Guirola’s telegram of August 6, 1890, stating that telegrams for Mr. Mizner were not detained in Salvador. 123
206 Same to same Nov. 18 Killing of General Barrundia: Recapitulates the facts in the case; cites analogous cases; reviews the course pursued by Mr. Mizner in the matter, and condemns it. Instructs him to turn over the legation to Mr. Kimberly, as chargé d’affaires ad interim. 123
225 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Kimberly Dec. 22 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Reviews the facts in the case. The United States Government considers itself clearly entitled to some satisfactory apology or reparation from Guatemala, but prefers that the suggestion to that effect should come from the Guatemalan Government. 142
227 Mr. Mizner to Mr. Blaine Dec. 31 Killing of General Barrundia: Has this day turned over the legation to Mr. Kimberly. Defends his action in the Barrundia case, and states that, with the exception of the Mexican legation, the entire diplomatic corps in Central America has indorsed it in writing. 144
[Page XL]

china.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
988 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine 1889. Oct. 31 Claim of Louis McCaslin for injuries suffered by the closing of a bridge of boats at Ningpo, April 29, 1888: Reports the trial of the case, and the refusal of the foreign office (yamên) to grant any relief. 147
1005 Same to same Nov. 19 Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: The local authorities refuse to give them a lot in the city in exchange for the one which they had purchased, and from which they had been driven at the time of the Chi-nan-fu riots. Incloses copies of his correspondence with the missionaries on the subject. 148
476 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Dec. 12 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Asks for copies of his correspondence with the yamên in the case. 152
1018 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Dec. 30 Travel certificates permitting Americans to travel in the interior of China: Recommends that hereafter they be issued for the proposed trip, and not for a whole year as heretofore; incloses a copy of his letter of December 29, 1889, to the United States consul at Amoy with regard to a travel certificate for Chun Arfat, a Chinaman claiming to be a naturalized citizen of the United States. 153
1032 Same to same 1890. Jan. 14 Claim of Rev. Gilbert Reid against the Chinese Government for an assault made upon him by Chinese rioters at Chi-nan-fu November 28, 1887: Incloses a copy of his note of November 25, 1889, to the yamên, presenting the said claim and of the yamên’s reply, dated December 1, 1889, stating that the governor of Shan-Tung has been directed to make a report on the case. Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: Incloses a copy of a note of January 10, 1890, from the yamên, stating that a tract of land had been sold to the missionaries in place of the city lot in Chi-nan-fu. 155
1037 Same to same Jan. 26 Claim of Rev. Gilbert Reid: Incloses copies of his note of the 14th instant, to the Yamên, the Yamên’s reply of the 18th instant, and his rejoinder of the 24th instant. 158
495 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Jan. 31 Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: Cites article 17 of the treaty of 1844 and article 12 of the treaty of 1858 between the United States and China concerning property. It is desirable that in seeking establishments in the interior a spirit of patience and moderation should prevail. 160
1045 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Feb. 4 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a letter of January 10, 1890, from the missionaries, adducing arguments and facts showing that the purchase of the tract of land in the country had nothing to do with the town lot, and expressing their willingness to accept another lot in the city in place of that which had been taken from them. 161
1049 Same to same Feb. 9 Claim of Louis McCaslin against China: Incloses copies of all his correspondence with the yamên on the subject. 165
498 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Feb. 20 Travel certificates: Is inclined to take Mr. Frelinghuysen’s position that a travel certificate should only be issued for the particular trip undertaken by the applicant. 173
1058 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 26 Passports and travel certificates: Suggests that the Department issue a circular directed to the United States consuls in China setting forth the manner of applying for passports and of issuing travel certificates. Gives his reasons for making the suggestion. Incloses a form for the proposed circular. 174
1061 Same to same Mar. 6 Passports: Renews the recommendation with regard to a circular embodying full information as to the mode of applying for passports in China. 175
1068 Same to same Mar. 18 Access to the United States for Dr. Alvin F. Howe, a Chinese subject: Requests information as to the means of procuring the same. 177
510 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Mar. 24 Claim of Louis McCaslin: The Chinese Government should not permit a fair and just consideration of the case to be prevented by the misunderstanding between the United States [Page XLI] consul at Ningpo and the taotai, described in a dispatch from the former dated the 12th ultimo, nor allow an adverse judgment of so doubtful a character to stand. 178
512 Same to same Apr. 12 Complaint of the American Presbyterian Mission at Chi-nan-fu: Instructs him to assist the missionaries in obtaining another town lot in place of the original one. 179
517 Same to same Apr. 18 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Instructs him to present the claim to the Chinese Government de novo, and to request a reopening of it. 180
1113 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine May 5 Same subject: Incloses a copy of his note to the yamên, asking for a joint investigation of the case. 181
523 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby May 6 Passports and travel certificates for Americans in China: Gives instructions with regard to the same and incloses a copy of Department circular to the United States consular officers in China, dated May 1, 1890, on the subject. 182
1114 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine May 10 Transit passes for goods exported from China: Incloses a copy of a note of this date from the yamên, and of a note of the 9th instant from the German minister to his colleagues, with regard to fixing limits for the duration of transit passes. 184
530 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby May 17 Access to the United States for Dr. Alvin F. Howe: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 14th instant from the Secretary of the Treasury, stating that the taotai’s certificate, properly viséed by the United States minister or consul, would enable Dr. Howe to land in the United States. 186
542 Same to same June 25 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Approves Mr. Denby’s note of the 5th ultimo to the yamên on the subject. 187
544 Same to same June 27 Transit passes for goods exported from China: The period of their validity should be determined by agreement between the authorities and the consular representatives of the treaty powers. 187
1123 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine July 25 Chinese exclusion bill: Incloses a translation of a note of the 16th ultimo from the yamên, discussing the same and protesting against it as a violation of existing treaties, and a copy of his reply of the 26th instant acknowledging its receipt. Chinese enumeration bill: Incloses a translation of a note of the 17th ultimo from the yamên, protesting against the same, and a copy of his reply of the 26th instant acknowledging its receipt. 187
1125 Same to same July 26 Complaint of the American Presbyterian Mission at Chi-nan-fu: Incloses a copy of his letter of the 25th instant to Rev. Gilbert Reid, embodying the substance of Department’s No. 512 of April 12, 1890. 192
1125 bis. Same to same July 26 Claim of Louis McCaslin: Incloses a copy of his note to the yamên, transmitting a translation of Department’s No. 517 of April 18, 1890. Will seek an oral interview with the yamên. 193
1140 Same to same Aug. 4 Hydrographic surveys of the ports of China: Incloses a copy of his note of this date to the yamên, maintaining the right of foreign men-of-war to make such surveys. 193
1146 Same to same Aug. 11 Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: Incloses a copy of his note to the yamên, notifying them of the willingness of the missionaries to accept another city lot in place of the original one. Claim of Rev. Gilbert Reid vs. China: In the same note Mr. Denby requests the yamên to have a public example made of the ringleaders of the riot in which Mr. Reid was injured, and to indemnify him for his injuries. 195
553 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Denby. Sept. 24 Segregation of the Chinese in San Francisco: Approves his note of July 26 to the yamên on the subject. 196
556 Same to same Sept. 25 Hydrographic surveys of the ports of China: Approves his note of August 4 to the yamên on the subject. 196
[Page XLII]1150 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Aug. 16 Marriages between Americans in China: Reports his recent action on a question as to the mode of solemnizing such marriages. The minister is not authorized to perform the ceremony, nor to witness it officially, and can not give a marriage certificate, but a consul can do all three. 197
1151 Same to same Aug. 20 Claim of Rev. Gilbert Reid: Incloses a translation of a note of the 17th instant from the yamên, reiterating its refusal to pay any indemnity to Mr. Reid. Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu. In the same note the yamên states that the missionaries must accept the country tract in place of the city lot. If they press the matter, the populace may cause trouble. 197
1153 Same to same Aug. 21 Navigation of the Yang-tse River: Incloses a copy of the recent Chun-Khing convention, allowing English sailing vessels to ascend the Yang-tse River as far as Chun-Khing and making Chun-Khing an open port. 199
1155 Same to same Aug. 28 Sze-chuen: Gives a sketch of the history, geography, agriculture, and commerce of the province of Sze-chuen. 201
1161 Same to same Sept. 11 Silver: Gives statistics with regard to silver currency in China, and the rise in the value of silver caused by the passage of the “silver bill” by Congress. Describes the new Chinese silver coinage. 204
1164 Same to same Sept. 26 Silver coinage: A proclamation has been issued making the new Chinese silver coins a legal tender in every part of China. 206
562 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Oct. 11 Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: Instructs Mr. Denby to keep the matter in sight and to endeavor, in all proper ways, to further the reasonable desires of the missionaries. 206
1181 Mr. Denby to Mr. Blaine Oct. 22 Chinese exclusion bill: Incloses a translation of a note of the 19th instant from the yamên, complaining that Mr. Blaine had made no reply to the communications of the Chinese minister at Washington on the subject, and a copy of his reply of the 22d instant, explaining the silence of the Secretary of State. 206
1190 Same to same Nov. 7 Complaint of the American Presbyterian mission at Chi-nan-fu: Incloses a copy of his note of the 1st instant to the yamên, stating that the missionaries are willing to surrender the country tract if they can obtain a suitable lot in the city. Claim of Rev. Gilbert Reid. In the same note of November 1 to the yamên, Mr. Denby states that he does not waive or compromise Mr. Reid’s claim for indemnity for injuries done him by the rioters, but considers it still pending and unsettled. 208
571 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Denby Dec. 16 Marriages of Americans in China: Approves Mr. Denby’s views as to the proper mode of performing the marriage ceremony. Cites the law on the subject. 209

correspondence with the legation of china at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Tsui 1890. Jan. 31 Transit of Chinese laborers through the United States: It appears by a letter of the 28th instant from the Treasury Department that the Southern Pacific Company, which is said to control a large share of the Chinese transit business, is about to execute the bond provided for by the amendment to the Treasury Department’s circular of September 28, 1889, so that the Chinese laborers carried by that company will not be required to give a special bond. 210
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine Feb. 27 Same subject: The opening of one line across the continent to Chinese laborers is not a compliance with the existing treaty stipulations that entitle Chinese subjects to the same privileges of free transit through the territory of the United States as the subjects of the most favored nation. The facts and reasons set forth in his notes of November 5 and December 16, 1889, remain uncontroverted. 210
[Page XLIII]Mr. Blaine to Mr. Tsui Mar. 13 Same subject: Has referred Mr. Tsui’s note of February 27 to the Secretary of the Treasury. 211
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine Mar. 26 Chinese exclusion bill: Describes the injustice done by the said bill to Chinese subjects who had left the United States with return certificates in their possession, and who, on their return, were denied permission to land, although they displayed their certificates, many of them having their families and their property in the United States; complains of the difficulties placed in the way of the transit of Chinese laborers, and the interference of the customs officials with the business of Chinese merchants in the United States; contrasts this treatment with the fidelity with which the Chinese Government has recognized and enforced its treaty stipulations towards American merchants and missionaries; cites decisions of the United States Supreme Court, showing that the bill is a violation of existing treaties; asks for information as to the President’s views on the subject. 211
Mr. Pung to Mr. Blaine May 23 Segregation of Chinese subjects in San Francisco: Incloses a copy of an order of the board of supervisors of San Francisco, dated February 17, 1890, prohibiting Chinese, under penalty of imprisonment, from residing or carrying on business in the city and county of San Francisco, except within a certain specified district; complains that a large number of Chinese have been arrested for failure to comply with the provisions of the said order; asks that immediate steps be taken to remedy the injury done to Chinese subjects by the order in violation of the third article of the treaty of 1880. 219
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pung May 27 same subject: Has referred his note of the 23d instant to the Attorney-General; meanwhile the Chinese who have been arrested can obtain relief in the courts. 221
Mr. Pung to Mr. Blaine June 7 Same subject: under the treaty of 1880, China consented to surrender certain treaty rights as to immigration upon the express condition and assurance that Chinese subjects in the United States should receive special protection, and that assurance was embodied in article 3. They already possessed the right of appeal to the courts; when Americans in China are threatened with ill treatment at the hands of the local authorities the American minister is prompt to demand the active interposition of the Imperial Government, and the latter has never replied that the American residents must, alone and unsupported by the Imperial power and influence, carry on their contest with the local authorities, but has always promptly interfered to secure to them their treaty rights. 221
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Pung June 14 Segregation of Chinese subjects in San Francisco: Construes article 3 of the treaty of 1880 to mean that, where existing measures or remedies were found to be insufficient, the United States Government would try to devise others to supply the defect. The American minister in China, when invoking the direct intervention of the Imperial Government for the protection of American citizens in China, has merely followed the course marked out in the treaties in accordance with the system of government prevailing in China. This is no evidence that the said article 3 contemplated that the same course would be pursued in the United States, where the organization of the Government is different. The Attorney-General, in a letter of the 9th instant, expresses the opinion that the ordinance complained of is within the prohibition of the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution, and is also a violation of the treaty stipulations of the United States with China, and it is therefore void. He advises that the proper mode of determining authoritatively that the ordinance has no validity is by application to the United States courts. 223
[Page XLIV]Mr. Pung to Mr. Blaine June 23 Segregation of Chinese subjects in San Francisco: Acknowledges the receipt of Mr. Blaine’s note of the 14th instant; regrets the variance of their views with regard to the duty imposed upon the United States Government by the third article of the treaty of 1880. 226
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine Sept. 14 Expulsion of Chinese subjects from Aberdeen, Washington: Has received a telegram from the Chinese consul-general at San Francisco, stating that the Chinese residents of Aberdeen had been notified by the citizens that they must leave the town at once; asks that such measures may be taken by telegraph as will secure the Chinese subjects at Aberdeen the protection to which they are entitled under existing treaties. 226
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Tsui Sept. 16 Same subject: Acknowledges note of 14th instant and telegram of 15th instant; has wired the governor of Washington, stating facts and asking him to prevent any disturbance of order or violation of the rights of the Chinese residing at Aberdeen. 227
Same to same Sept. 19 Expulsion of Chinese subjects from Aberdeen, Washington: Has received a telegram from the governor of Washington, saying that he will use every means in his power to prevent any violation of law at Aberdeen. 227
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine Oct. 1 Chinese exclusion bill: Is surprised not to have received any reply to his note of March 26, 1890. Has been instructed to ask again that early attention be given to that and to previous notes of the legation on the subject. The losses and injuries now being suffered by thousands of his countrymen, owing to the rigorous enforcement of the bill, impel him to redouble his efforts to secure redress. Appeals to the American code of international law for the settlement of the difficulties between China and the United States. His Government requests that he be informed as promptly as possible of the views of the United States Government. 228
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Tsui Oct. 6 Chinese exclusion bill: The questions presented in the legation’s notes have been, and are now, the subject of careful consideration on the part of the United States Government. Hopes to convey to him at an early day, in an ample and formal manner, the President’s views, in the matter. 229
Mr. Tsui to Mr. Blaine Dec. 4 Same subject: Is instructed by his Government to convey to Mr. Blaine its disappointment at the adjournment of Congress without having taken any action looking to the repeal or modification of the bill, and to express the hope that during the present session it will take such steps as will assure the Chinese Government of the desire of that of the United States to maintain in full force and vigor the treaties entered into between the two nations. 229

colombia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
48 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine 1889. Dec. 12 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith, an American citizen, who died at Colon: The United States consul has requested his good offices in the settlement of the said estate. Recites the facts in the case, the legal questions involved, and the opinion of counsel. Incloses a copy of a letter, dated November 7, 1889, detailing the circumstances, from the United States consul at Colon, and accompaniments, and translations of two letters, dated respectively December 11 and December 12, 1889, from Gutierrez & Escobar, lawyers, of Bogota, giving their legal opinion of the case. 231
[Page XLV]42 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott 1890. Jan. 9 Seizure of American vessels on the San Blas coast for alleged violation of the customs laws of Colombia: Cabled him on the 8th instant to make a full report on the subject. 239
54 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine Jan. 11 Same subject: The Colombian Government disclaims any knowledge of any seizures except that of the British schooner Pearl and that of a schooner flying the Dominican flag. There are three classes of ports, viz, free ports, ports “habilitados,” and ports not “habilitados.” Importations are only permitted into the free ports and the ports “habilitados.” Commerce between free ports and ports not “habilitados” is expressly prohibited. Coast trade between ports “habilitados” and ports not “habilitados” is permitted to all vessels carrying merchandise of the country, or foreign merchandise on which the duties have been paid in some port “habilitado.” The San Blas coast lies between the free port of Colon and the “habilitado” port of Carthagena. None of its ports are either free or “habilitado,” and all direct importations are prohibited and clearly illegal. The vessel making them is subject to confiscation, with its cargo. Consuls certifying to invoices to those ports are liable to fine. Notwithstanding this, the Colombian consul at New York has granted the usual papers to vessels clearing from New York for San Blas ports and other ports not “habilitados,” probably with the cognizance of the Colombian Government. Consul has been recently ordered to issue no more such papers. 239
57 Same to same Jan. 20 Same subject; The New York papers state that the American schooners Willie and Julian, whose owners had, by the advice of the Colombian consul at New York, obtained a special permit to trade on the San Bias coast from the authorities at Colon, have been seized by the Colombian cruiser La Popa for infringement of the Customs laws, and taken to Carthagena. Can find no provision of law authorizing such a permit. The minister of foreign affairs says that there is no such law or custom. There seems to be no disposition to confiscate these schooners. They will be allowed to trade on the San Blas coast on payment of the regular customs dues at Carthagena. 240
65 Same to same Feb. 1 Same subject: No change in the situation. Nothing known about the reported seizure of the Julian and the Willie. Gives a statement of the laws of Colombia relative to importations. Incloses translations of the most important provisions. 241
66 Same to same Feb. 6 Same subject: Calls attention to the distinction between the free coast and the San Bias coast. Nothing has been heard of the Julian and Willie. The Whitford has arrived at Colon, and was told by the authorities there that she must go to Carthagena and pay her duties in order to obtain permission to trade on the San Blas coast. Incloses translations of decrees relating to the free ports and to frauds on the revenue. 245
48 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott Mar. 3 Same subject: A report of the consul at Colon agrees with the results of Mr. Abbott’s investigations as to trade on the San Blas coast. Instructs him to see that no American vessel, appearing to have acted in good faith, is subjected to any unnecessary inconvenience or restraint, and to impress upon the Colombian Government the necessity of making its requirements clearly known. Incloses a copy of a letter of the 3d instant from the Department to Foster & Co., the complainants in the case of the Julian, and a translation of the Colombian laws regulating commerce in Colombian waters. 249
71 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine Mar. 7 Same subject: The Pearl and the Julian, which latter is said to have sailed under the Dominican flag, are believed to have been released. 253
[Page XLVI]74 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine Apr. 15 Same subject: The Colombian Government has issued full and explicit instructions with regard to trade on the San Blas coast. No new regulations have been made. The Julian has paid the duties on her cargo and sailed for the San Blas coast. 254
77 Same to same Apr. 24 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith: Matters are to remain in statu quo until the case can be investigated. 254
67 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott May 29 Same subject: Discusses the question as to whether the United States consul at Colon had the right to sell the two houses belonging to the estate. Thinks that he had, under the tenth paragraph of the third article of the consular convention of 1850. Gives reasons for regarding the houses as movable property which the consul had the right to take possession of and sell. Instructs him to maintain the validity of the sale by the consul. 255
95 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine July 18 Same subject: The minister of foreign affairs has promised to discuss the matter with him as soon as possible. 258
113 Same to same Aug. 14 Claim of the Boston Ice Company against Colombia: Incloses a copy and translation of that part of the report of the minister of foreign affairs relating to the said claim, and arguing to show that it is unfounded. 258
117 Same to same Aug. 18 Claim of the Panama Star and Herald against Colombia: Incloses a copy and translation of that part of the report of the minster of foreign affairs relating to the said claim, and arguing to show that it was unfounded. 260
94 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Abbott. Aug. 21 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith: Considers the views expressed in Department’s No. 67 of May 29, 1890, obviously sound. 261
120 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine Aug. 22 Same subject: The minister of foreign affairs, in violation of the agreement entered into by him with Mr. Abbott, has made extended and adverse comments on the Smith case in his biennial report. Had an interview with the minister on the 18th instant, and notified him of Department’s instructions. He requested time to consult the President. The following day he received an official note from the minister, dated 14 instant, asking him to forward to the United States for service a process of a local court assuming to settle the estate of Alexander Henry, an American citizen, who died in Colombia several years ago. Feeling that a compliance with this request would be a direct acknowledgment of the right of the court to assume jurisdiction in the case, he returned the process with a note declining to admit the said jurisdiction. Incloses a copy of that part of the report of the minister of foreign affairs relating to the estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith, and of correspondence relating to the estate of Alexander Henry. 262
121 Same to same Aug. 22 Estate of Alexander Henry, a citizen of the United States, who died in Colombia some years ago: Gives a history of the circumstances attending the settlement of said estate; incloses an unsigned copy of a letter dated February 7, 1887, apparently from the legation to the minister of foreign affairs on the subject. 266
114 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Abbott Oct. 10 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith: Department finds nothing in the report of the minister of foreign affairs to affect the position taken by it with regard to the interpretation of the tenth paragraph of article 3 of the consular convention of 1850; his arguments are more than anticipated in Department’s instructions. 268
115 Same to same Oct. 10 Estate of Alexander Henry: Approves his action in declining to transmit any papers relating to the said estate. 269
120 Mr. Adee to Mr. Abbott Oct. 24 Claims of United States citizens against Colombia: Regrets that Colombia has not yet become a party to the general arbitration treaty between the American states. The United States is now forced to recall to the attention of the Colombian Government the necessity of an early settlement of these claims; instructs him to [Page XLVII]learn whether the Colombian Government is prepared to give its minister at Washington full authority to take up the discussion of them with the Department. 269
145 Mr. Abbott to Mr. Blaine Oct. 24 Estate of Mrs. S. H. Smith: Relates further steps taken in the case by the judge at Colon; incloses a copy and translation of a note of August 25, 1890, from the minister of foreign affairs, acknowledging the receipt of Mr. Abbott’s note of August 22, 1890. 270

correspondence with the legation of colombia at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hurtado 1890. Jan. 31 Claim of the Panama Star and Herald against Colombia: States the facts in the case; no redress has been made to the claimants, although it is now nearly 4 years since the wrong was committed; thinks that such redress should now be tendered. 272
Same to same May 7 Same subject: Requests a reply to his note of January 31, 1890; hopes to receive a proposition for the settlement of the claim. 273
Mr. Hurtado to Mr. Blaine May 9 Same subject: As the wrong complained of was the personal act of General Santo Domingo Vila, and had been disavowed by the Colombian Government, redress should be sought by bringing suit against him in the Colombian courts. 273

france.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
29 Mr. Reid to Mr. Blaine 1889. July 16 Citizenship in France: Gives a synopsis of the new French law of June 26, 1889, relating to nationality. 276
99 Same to same Nov. 26 Hog products: Arrangements are being made with the French Government for the official inspection of the American pork at the Paris Exhibition. 280
114 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Reid 1890. Mar. 4 Cattle and meat: Incloses a copy of a letter of February 18, 1890, from the Secretary of Agriculture, showing the injustice and the injurious effects of the restrictions placed by certain European governments on the importation of American cattle and meats. Instructs him to try to procure the removal of such restrictions in France. 281
198 Mr. Reid to Mr. Blaine July 4 Hog products: Incloses a copy of his letter of the 3d instant to the minister of foreign affairs, adducing arguments to show the justice and expediency of repealing the prohibition of the importation of American hog products. 283
201 Same to same July 11 Same subject: Describes a recent interview with the minister of foreign affairs on the subject; the minister gave him no definite reply. 286
209 Same to same July 25 Discrimination against American lubricating oils: Incloses a copy of his note of July 9, 1891, to the minister of foreign affairs, transmitting a memorandum of a letter received by Mr. Reid from a large American petroleum importing house, complaining of a proposed discrimination by the French Government in favor of Russian lubricating oils as against those of American origin. 287
210 Same to same July 28 Hog products: Incloses a copy of a note of the 11th instant from the minister of foreign affairs on the subject, and of his reply of this date, showing the fallacy of the minister’s complaints of the McKinley bill. 288
215 Same to same Aug. 5 Same subject: Gives the substance of his conversation with the minister of foreign affairs on the preceding Saturday. 290
[Page XLVIII]224 Mr. Reid to Mr. Blaine Aug. 15 Same subject: Relates a conversation with the minister of foreign affairs on the preceding Wednesday; incloses a copy of a memorandum which he had then handed to the minister, showing that, with the exception of Italy, France was the first European nation to exclude American pork. 291
225 Same to same Aug. 21 Discrimination against American lubricating oils: Incloses a copy and translation of a note of the 14th instant from the minister of foreign affairs, explaining the alleged discrimination referred to in Mr. Reid’s note of July 9, 1891. 291
176 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Reid Sept. 22 Same subject: Regrets that the United States alone of all the pretroleum-producing countries must suffer by this discrimination in favor of all countries having the most-favored-nation clause in their commercial treaties with France, and especially of Russia. 292
278 Mr. Vignaud to Mr. Blaine Dec. 18 Death of Senator Edmond de Lafayette on the 12th instant: Gives a sketch of his life and character; incloses a table of the descendants of General Lafayette. 294

germany.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
21 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Phelps 1889. Nov. 27 Passports: Calls attention to certain inaccuracies in the passport returns of the legation for the quarter ending September 30, 1889. 297
23 Same to same Dec. 3 Cattle: Incloses a copy of a letter of November 22, 1889, from the Secretary of Agriculture asking for information as to an alleged German law prohibiting the importation of cattle from the United States, and a copy of the Hamburg quarantine law of 1879. Asks for copies of any other German law bearing on the subject. 298
46 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Dec. 17 Passports: Makes explanations with regard to the issue of passports by the legation and asks for certain instructions on the subject. 299
50 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Phelps 1890. Jan. 10 Passports: Gives the instructions requested in Mr. Phelps’s No. 46 of the 17th ultimo. 300
57 Same to same Feb. 1 Passports: Discusses certain questions connected with the issue of a passport by the legation to Mrs. Emilie Heisinger and her minor son Carl. 301
73 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Feb. 15 Labor conference: Incloses copies and translations of two recent decrees relating to the improvement of the condition of the working classes, and directing that all other governments interested in the matter, be invited to a conference on the subject. Incloses, also, a copy and translation of the Emperor’s address to the council of state on the same subject. 304
79 Same to same Mar. 1 Samoan treaty: Incloses clippings from German newspapers criticising the treaty. 306
72 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Phelps Mar. 4 Cattle and meat: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 18th ultimo from the Secretary of Agriculture, showing the injustice and the injurious effects of the restrictions placed by certain European governments on the importation of American cattle and meat. Instructs him to lay the subject before the German Government, and to remonstrate especially against the quarantine against American cattle, particularly those intended for immediate slaughter. 307
88 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine Mar. 25 Cattle and meat: Has been unable to discover any legislation on the subject of the importation of American cattle, hogs, and hog products, except the law of March 6, 1883, prohibiting the importation of American hogs and hog products. Incloses copies of the said law and a copy of his note of the 21st instant to the foreign office, asking for information with regard to the quarantine against American cattle and requesting that the same be abolished. 308
[Page XLIX]126 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Blaine June 10 Passports of Americans entering Germany from France: Recommends a certain change in the wording of the notice by the Department on the subject. 310
134 Same to same June 30 Cattle, hogs, and hog products: Incloses a copy of a note of the 23d instant from the foreign office, transmitting copies of the laws in force in Germany affecting the importation of American cattle, hogs, and hog products, and declining to abolish or modify the decrees restricting the importation of American cattle, on the ground that there are diseases existing among the cattle in the United States. 311
122 Mr. Adee to Mr. Phelps July 10 Passports of Americans entering Alsace-Lorraine from France: Incloses copies of the notice by the Department altered in compliance with Mr. Phelps’s suggestion in his No. 126 of the 10th ultimo. 316
123 Same to same July 17 Cattle and meat: Regrets that Germany, in assigning reasons for her policy of exclusion, has again taken the untenable ground that American meats are unhealthful. 317

correspondence with the legation of germany at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Count von Arco-Valley to Mr. Blaine. 1890. Mar. 2 Samoan treaty: Incloses a copy of a memorandum relative to the execution of certain provisions of the general act of the Samoan conference at Berlin. 317
Mr. Blaine to Count von Arco-Valley. Mar. 7 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a telegram of the 6th instant, sent by Department to the United States vice-consul at Apia, instructing him to unite with the German and British consuls in the execution of certain articles of the Samoan treaty. 318
Count von Arco-Valley to Mr. Blaine. May 1 Tonnage dues: On the 26th of January, 1888, the President issued a proclamation suspending the collection of the whole of the duty of 6 cents per ton, not to exceed 30 cents per ton per annum, upon vessels entered in the ports of the United States from any of the ports of the German Empire. The Commissioner of Navigation decided that only such German vessels as sail “direct” from German ports to the United States ports are exempted from the payment of tonnage dues. The legation, in a note of February 25, 1888, protested against this decision as a direct violation of the President’s proclamation, and the Secretary of State, in his note of February 28, 1888, promised a speedy remedy, and a detailed reply to the protest. No reply has been received; asks that it may be now made. 318
Mr. Blaine to Count von Arco-Valley. May 26 Tonnage dues: The question to which Count Arco’s note of the 1st instant relates has been made the subject of a suit in the courts which has not yet been decided. The Commissioner of Navigation did not decide that only such German vessels as sail directly from German ports to ports in the United States should be exempt from tonnage dues. The cases of vessels not coming direct to the United States were reserved by him for consideration. It was not the intent, either of the law or the proclamation, to allow vessels trading with England, France, or other foreign countries to be exempted from tonnage dues merely because they sail originally from ports in Germany. 319
Same to same Dec. 1 Tonnage dues: Incloses a copy of a circular of November 26, 1890, issued by the Commissioner of Navigation, stating that the fact that a vessel touches at an intermediate port at which it neither enters nor clears will not deprive such vessel of the rights derived from sailing from a free port, such being its port of departure. 320
[Page L]

great britain.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
141 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln 1889. Dec. 6 Taxation of American missionaries in Burmah: Incloses a copy of a letter of October 15, 1889, from Rev. A. Bunker, an American missionary in Burmah, complaining that the Government of India not only taxes the allowances which the missionaries receive from the United States missionary boards, but has now issued a new order requiring them to pay an income tax on all moneys paid for the support of their families in the United States. Instructs Mr. Lincoln to lay the matter before the British Government. 321
Mr. Blaine to Mr. White (telegram). Dec. 30 Boundary dispute between Great Britain and Venezuela: Authorizes him to confer with Lord Salisbury concerning the reëstablishment of diplomatic relations between Great Britain and Venezuela upon the basis suggested by the Venezuelan minister, of temporary restoration of the status quo. 322
151 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine 1890. Jan. 6 Discrimination against American vessels at Halifax in the matter of compulsory pilotage: Incloses a copy of a note of the 3d instant, from the foreign office, transmitting an extract from a report of a committee of the privy council of Canada stating that all British and foreign vessels coming from foreign ports and over 80 tons register pay pilotage dues at Halifax. 322
184 Same to same Feb. 19 Passport for Samuel B. Oliver: Incloses a copy of his letter of the 14th instant to the United States consul at Liverpool, giving his reasons for declining to issue such passport. 329
215 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln Mar. 19 Same subject: Approves Mr. Lincoln’s views on the subject, but will consider any statement that Mr. Oliver may make, either directly or through the legation. 324
197 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine Mar. 20 Taxation of American missionaries in Burmah: Incloses a copy of the legation’s note of December 18, 1889, to Lord Salisbury on the subject, and of the latter’s reply of the 18th instant, transmitting copies of documents received from the Government of India, and expressing regret that the Government of India, after a full consideration of the case, is unable to make an exception in favor of the missionaries. 325
219 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln Mar. 24 Passport for F. C. Van Duzer: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 5th instant, from F. C. VanDuzer, complaining that the legation had declined to issue him a passport because he could not state at what time he expected to return to the United States with the purpose of residing there; gives certain instructions for Mr. Lincoln’s guidance and leaves the disposition of the case to his judgment. 328
203 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine Mar. 28 Traveling certificate issued by the State of Minnesota to Louis Wagner: Incloses a copy of the said document, which was presented at the legation this day by Mr. Wagner, he supposing it to be a regular passport. 330
204 Same to same Mar. 31 Passport for Samuel B. Oliver: Has sent Mr. Oliver a copy of Department’s No. 215 of the 19th instant, through the United States consul at Liverpool. 331
212 Same to same April 9 Passport for Samuel B. Oliver: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 8th instant from the United States consul at Liverpool, stating that he has communicated the contents of Department’s No. 215 to Mr. Oliver’s father, Mr. Oliver himself being now in Portugal. 331
213 Same to same April 9 Passport for Mr. H. C. Quinby: Mr. Quinby has written to the legation asking for a copy of the instructions relating to passports, for the expressed purpose of writing “a statement of the case to one of the Boston papers,” “the case,” being the legation’s refusal to issue him a passport on account of his declining to state in his application at what time he intends to return to the United States to reside. Has written to Mr. Quinby, declining to send him an official blank for such a purpose. Incloses a copy of a memorandum of March 1, 1890, written by the [Page LI]second secretary of legation, showing that Mr. Quinby had informed him that he never expected to return to the United States to resume the duties of citizenship. 331
233 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln April 10 Traveling certificate issued to Louis Wagner by the State of Minnesota: Incloses copies of correspondence relating to a similar case at Vienna. 332
237 Same to same April 14 Taxation of American missionaries in Burmah: Asks for two additional copies of the printed document accompanying his No. 197 of the 20th ultimo. 334
242 Same to same April 18 Traveling certificate issued to Louis Wagner by the State of Minnesota: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 11th instant from the governor of Minnesota, stating that no more such papers will be issued. 335
251 Same to same April 30 Passport for H. C. Quinby: Approves his refusal to furnish Mr. Quinby an official blank form to be used for the sole purpose of writing to a newspaper. Mr. Quinby can see the blank forms of applications for passports and the printed instructions to applicants at the United States consulate at Liverpool. Mr. Quinby’s actual status is only a matter of inference. He has simply declined to make application for a passport. Had he filled out the blank form offered him, with a declaration of his intention never to return to the land whose protection he craves, it would have been easy to deal with his application. 335
Same to same (telegram) May 1 Boundary dispute between Great Britain and Venezuela: Instructs him to use his good offices with Lord Salisbury to bring about the resumption of diplomatic intercourse between Great Britain and Venezuela, and to propose to Lord Salisbury an informal conference of representatives of the three powers in Washington or London. 337
Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine (telegram). May 5 Same subject: Lord Salisbury suggests that the termination of diplomatic relations was due to the action of Venezuela, and, with regard to a settlement of the matter, he intimated a doubt of the stability of the Venezuelan Government. 337
229 Same to same May 5 Same subject: Describes his interview of this date with Lord Salisbury, in which he conveyed to him the substance of Department’s telegram of the 1st instant. Lord Salisbury said that he would consider the suggestion of a conference after he had consulted the colonial office. Incloses a copy of his note of this date to Lord Salisbury, making the formal proposition that an informal conference of representatives of Great Britain, Venezuela, and the United States be held either in Washington or London, with a view to the resumption of diplomatic relations between Great Britain and Venezuela. 337
255 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln May 6 Boundary dispute between Great Britain and Venezuela: Instructs him to do all in his power, consistently with an attitude of impartial friendliness, to arrive at some agreement between the two Governments, by which the rights of each may be secured. Incloses copies of recent communications from the United States minister at Caracas and the Venezuelan minister at Washington, and of Senate document No. 226, first session, Fiftieth Congress, on the subject. 339
264 Same to same May 19 Boundary dispute between Great Britain and Venezuela: Incloses a copy of dispatch, No. 100 of the 3d instant from the United States minister at Caracas, transmitting a sketch map of the disputed boundary between British Guiana and Venezuela. 339
267 Same to same May 21 Same subject: Has communicated to the Venezuelan minister at Washington the substance of Mr. Lincoln’s No. 229 of the 5th instant and sent a copy of it to the United States minister at Caracas. 340
270 Same to same May 26 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a note of the 20th instant from the Venezuelan minister at Washington. 340
[Page LII]249 Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Blaine. May 28 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a note of the 26th instant from Lord Salisbury, giving his reasons for declining the offers of the good offices of the United States in the matter. 340
267 Same to same June 25 Boundary dispute between Great Britain and Venezuela: Describes negotiations ending in his presenting to Lord Salisbury this day Señor Pulido, the Venezuelan minister, on special mission to Great Britain. 341
276 Same to same July 9 Passport for H. C. Quinby: Mr. Quinby called at the legation this day and presented his application for a passport, said application stating that he intended never to return to the United States with the purpose of residing and performing the duties of citizenship therein. Mr. Lincoln declined to issue him a passport. Incloses a copy of the application and of a letter of April 9, 1891, from Mr. Quinby to the Boston Post. 342
320 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Lincoln June 25 Services rendered by the British consul-general at Tabriz, Persia, and the British minister to Persia in the case of the murder of Mrs. J. N. Wright, the wife of an American missionary in Persia. Instructs him to express to the foreign office the Department’s high appreciation of the services rendered by the said officers in securing the arrest of the criminal. Incloses extracts from No. 456 of May 24, and 459 of June 3, 1890, from the United States minister at Teheran. 344
350 Same to same Sept. 2 Claim of William Webster against Great Britain: In legation’s No. 638 of December 10, 1887, Mr. Phelps inclosed to the Department printed copies of a memorandum of Sir Robert Stout, governor of New Zealand, concerning the claims of William Webster, a United States citizen, to certain lands in New Zealand, in reply to a report of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the United States Senate. That committee, after considering the reply, recommended the claim to the President as worthy of consideration and requested that it be made the subject of further negotiation with the British Government. Incloses a memorandum stating all the facts in the case, and giving Department’s reasons for being unable to accept the conclusions arrived at in Sir Robert Stout’s memorandum. Instructs him to present the claim to the British Government. 344
373 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Lincoln Oct. 22 Chinese immigration from Canada and Mexico: Instructs him to sound the British Government as to its willingness to enter into negotiations to the end of securing treaty stipulations for the prevention of the entry into the United States of Chinese laborers from Canada, and of insuring a reasonable uniform application of measures for the prevention of Chinese labor immigration in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
340 Mr. White to Mr. Blaine Nov. 6 Same subject: Gives the substance of his interview of the 5th instant with Lord Salisbury. The latter stated that the subject was entirely new to him, and that, before expressing an opinion on the subject, it would be necessary for him to ascertain the views of the Canadian government.
[Page LIII]

correspondence with the british legation at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Edwardes to Mr. Blaine. 1889. Aug. 24 Seizure of British sealing vessels in Behring Sea: Humors have reached the British Government that United States cruisers have stopped, searched, and even seized British vessels in Behring sea outside of the 3-mile limit from the nearest land. Asks that stringent instructions be sent to the United States officers, with a view to prevent the possibility of such occurrences taking place. Mr. Bayard last year assured the British Government that, pending the discussion of the several questions at issue, no further interference should take place with British vessels in Behring Sea. Sir Julian Pauncefote, on his return to Washington, will be prepared to discuss the whole question. 358
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Edwardes. Aug. 24 Same subject: The United States Government has received no official information regarding such seizures. It is the earnest desire of the President to have such an adjustment as shall remove all possible ground of misunderstanding with the British Government concerning the existing troubles in Behring Sea. He believes that the responsibility for delay in the adjustment can not properly be charged to the United States Government. The latter will endeavor to be prepared for the discussion of the whole question when Sir Julian Pauncefote returns. 359
Mr. Edwardes to Mr. Blaine. Aug. 25 Seizure of British sealing vessels in Behring Sea: Will communicate to his Government Mr. Blaine’s note of the 24th instant. 359
Same to same Sept. 12 Same subject: Asks for a reply to the request contained in his note of the 24th ultimo, that instructions be sent to Alaska to prevent the possibility of the seizure of British ships in Behring Sea. 360
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Edwardes. Sept. 14 Same subject: A categorical reply to his request that certain instructions be sent to Alaska would be unjust to the United States Government and misleading to the British Government. The President prefers to remand the whole subject to the formal discussion agreed upon. Any instructions sent to Behring Sea at the time of the original request (August 24) would have failed to have arrived there before the proposed departure of the United States cruisers. 360
Lord Salisbury to Mr. Edwardes. Oct. 2 Seizure of British sealing vessels in Behring Sea: The negotiations proposed by the United States regarding a close time for the seal fishery were suspended in consequence of objections raised by Canada. Sir Julian Pauncefote will be furnished with the requisite instructions, if Mr. Blaine wishes to resume them. 361
Same to same Oct. 2 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a dispatch of August 26, 1889, from the governor-general of Canada, and accompanying documents, relative to the seizure of the Canadian vessels Black Diamond and Triumph by the United States revenue cutter Rush in Bering Sea in July, 1889. Mr. Bayard gave an unofficial assurance that no more seizures of of this character should take place pending the discussion of the questions involved by the two governments. Protests against them, and considers them wholly unjustified by international law. 362
Mr. Edwardes to Mr. Blaine. Oct. 14 Seizure of British sealing vessels in Behring Sea: The assurance to which Lord Salisbury referred in his dispatch of the 2d instant was given unofficially to Lord Salisbury by the United States minister in London, and by Mr. Bayard to Sir Lionel West in April, 1888. 366
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. 1890 Jan. 22 Same subject: The Canadian vessels arrested were engaged in a pursuit which was, in itself, “contra bonos mores,” and involving a serious and permanent injury to the rights of the Government and people of the United States. The seal fisheries of Behring Sea are one of the most valuable sources of revenue from the Alaskan possessions. They were exclusively controlled [Page LIV]by Russia, without interference, from their original discovery until the cession of Alaska to the United States in 1867. They were enjoyed by the United States, without intrusion from any source, from 1867 to 1886. Vessels from other nations passing through Behring Sea had always abstained from the capture of seals in recognition of the right held and exercised, first by Russia and afterwards by the United States, and in recognition of the fact, now held beyond denial or doubt, that the taking of seals in the open sea rapidly leads to their extinction, because it involves the destruction of the female in common with the male. The United States Government, through competent agents, by close obedience to the laws of nature, and by rigidly limiting the number to be annually slaughtered, succeeded in increasing the number of the seals and the value of the fisheries. The company to which the fisheries were leased sent the skins to London to be dressed and prepared, and the amount thereby earned by English laborers since 1867 amounts in the aggregate to more than $12,000,000. In 1886 certain Canadian vessels asserted their right to enter, and by their ruthless course to destroy the fisheries. The United States Government at once proceeded to check this movement, and was surprised that the British Government should immediately interfere to defend and encourage the course of the Canadians. So great has been the injury to the fisheries from the irregular and destructive slaughter of seals in the open waters of Behring Sea by Canadian vessels that, whereas the Government had allowed 100,000 seals to be killed annually for a series of years, it is now compelled to reduce the number to 60,000. The British Government defends the course of the Canadan vessels on the ground that they are committing their acts of destruction on the high seas, that is to say, more than 3 marine miles from the shore line. The British Government would hardly abide by this rule if the attempt were made to interfere with the pearl fisheries of Ceylon, which extend more than 20 miles from the shore line, and which have been enjoyed by England without molestation ever since their acquisition; nor would it permit destructive modes of fishing on the Grand Banks, on the plea that the vicious acts were committed more than 3 miles from shore. The law of the sea, and the liberty which it confers, can not be perverted to justify acts which are immoral in themselves, and which inevitably tend to results against the interests and welfare of mankind. One step beyond the position which the British Government has taken in this matter, and piracy finds its justification. The President awaits any proposition for a reasonable adjustment that the British Government may submit. He regards the forcible resistance to which the United States is constrained in Behring Sea as demanded, not only by the necessity of defending the rights of the United States, but those, also, of good morals and good government throughout the world. The United States will not withhold from any nation the privileges which it demanded for itself when Alaska belonged to Russia, nor is it disposed to exercise any less power or authority in those possessions than it was willing to concede to Russia when they were hers. 366
Sir Julian Pauucefote to Mr. Blaine. Feb. 10 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: The British Government is willing to adopt Mr. Blaine’s suggestion that the negotiations between Great Britain, Russia, and the United States, regarding the establishment of a close time for the seal fisheries in Behring Sea, be resumed at Washington. 370
[Page LV] Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Mar. 1 Same subject: Incloses copies of evidence showing that the killing of seals in the open sea tends certainly and rapidly to the extermination of the species. 370
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Mar. 9 Same subject: Incloses a memorandum prepared by Mr. Tupper in reply to Mr. Blaine’s note of the 1st instant, and a note on the question of the protection of the fur seal in the North Pacific, by George Dawson. 382
Same to same Mar. 24 Samoa: Gives the substance of certain instructions which have been sent to the British consul at Apia with regard to the execution of certain provisions of the general act of the Samoan conference at Berlin. 408
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Mar. 26 Samoa: The instructions sent to the British consul at Apia appear to agree with the proposition submitted to Mr. Blaine by the German minister at Washington on the 2d instant and with the telegraphic instructions sent to the United States vice-consul at Apia on the 6th instant. 408
Same to same Apr. 8 Samoa: The President thinks that the appointment of a chief justice for Samoa by the King of Sweden would tend to create greater harmony in Samoa than the appointment of that officer by any one of the signatory powers. 409
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 30 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: Mr. Tingle, the United States agent, in 1887 reported that the number of the seals was on the increase, and, in 1888, that there were as many seals on the rookeries as in 1887. Mr. Elliott affirms that the natural increase of the fur-seal species is so rapid that Behring Sea itself could not contain them if they were not preyed upon by submarine foes. Mr. Tupper has shown in his memorandum that the destruction of seals caused by pelagic sealing is insignificant in comparison with that caused by their natural enemies, and he gives figures showing their marvelous increase in spite of the depredations complained of. Proposes that a mixed commission of experts be appointed to make investigations in the region of the seal fisheries, as to whether any restrictions on pelagic sealing are necessary for the preservation of the fur-seal species, and, if so, as to the character and extent of such restrictions; and that, pending such investigations, pelagic sealing be prohibited in Behring Sea, the Sea of Ochotsk, and the adjoining waters, during the months of May, June, October, November, and December; and that all sealing vessels be prohibited from approaching the breeding islands within a radius of 10 miles. Incloses a draft of a preliminary convention providing for the appointment of such mixed commission, regulations, arbitration, seal-fishery line and a close time for the seal-fisheries, etc. Incloses, also, an extract from a pamphlet entitled “Fur-seal Fisheries of the Pacific Coast and Alaska,” and affidavits of certain seal hunters, showing that comparatively few of the seals wounded by spears or firearms are lost. 410
Same to same May 10 Extradition: Incloses a copy of a dispatch of April 1, 1890, from the governor-general of India, in council, transmitting the forms of certificate proposed to be adopted in British India in support of applications for the extradition from the United States of fugitives from justice. Asks if such certificates will be accepted as sufficient by the United States courts. 417
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 15 Extradition: The form of certificate inclosed in Sir Julian’s note of the 10th instant is in accordance with that prescribed by the Department for the use of the legation in London. Copies of it will be sent to the United States consular officers in those parts of the British dominions in which they may be called upon to certify extradition papers. It is the best that could be devised under the circumstances. 419
[Page LVI] Lord Salisbury to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 22 Seizure of Canadian sealing vessels in Behring Sea: It is an axiom of international law that the seizure on the high seas and subsequent confiscation in time of peace of the private vessels of a friendly nation is only admissible in the case of piracy or in pursuance of special international agreement. Cites President Tyler’s message of February 27, 1843. The pursuit of seals in the open sea has never hitherto been considered pi-piracy by any civilized state. In the case of the slave trade, the right of arresting the vessels of another country is exercised only by special international agreement; must question whether the killing of fur seals can of itself be regarded as contra bonos mores, unless and until, for special reasons, it has been agreed by international arrangement, to forbid it; cites facts and adduces arguments to prove that the United States had always denied the exclusive right of Russia to the whaling and fishing in Behring Sea; is unable to admit that the case put forward on behalf of the United States affords any sufficient justification for the forcible action which it has taken against peaceable British subjects engaged in lawful operations on the high seas. Incloses a memorandum showing that from 1867 to 1886 British vessels were engaged at intervals in the fur-seal fisheries with the cognizance of the United States Government. 419
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. May 23 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: A statement having appeared in the newspapers, and having been confirmed by Mr. Blaine, that the United States revenue cruisers have received orders to proceed to Behring Sea to prevent the exercise of the seal fishery by foreign vessels in nonterritorial waters, he is instructed to state that a formal protest by the British Government against any such interference with British vessels will be forwarded to Mr. Blaine without delay. 424
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. May 26 Same subject: Acknowledges the receipt of Sir Julian’s note of the 23d instant. 424
Same to same May 29 Same subject: Is instructed by the President to protest against the course of the British Government in authorizing, encouraging, and protecting vessels which are not only interfering with American rights in Behring Sea, but which are doing violence as well to the rights of the civilized world. The President is surprised that such protest as the one announced in Sir Julian’s note of the 23d instant should be authorized by Lord Salisbury, because his previous declarations would seem to render it impossible. On the 11th of November, 1887, Lord Salisbury, in an official interview with the American minister, cordially agreed that “a code of regulations should be adopted for the preservation of the seals in Behring Sea from destruction at improper times by improper means by the citizens of either country,” and suggested that Mr. Phelps “should obtain from his Government, and submit to him, a sketch of a system of regulations which would be adequate for the purpose.” Mr. Phelps submitted the regulations which the United States desired, and reported to Mr. Bayard that Lord Salisbury assented to the proposition to establish a close time for fur seals between April 15 and November 1, and between 160 degrees west longitude and 170 degrees east longitude, in Behring Sea, and would cause an act to be introduced into Parliament to give effect to the arrangement, so soon as it could be prepared; and would also join the United States Government in any preventive measures which it might be thought best to adopt, by orders issued to the naval vessels of the respective governments in Behring Sea. Recites subsequent assurances given by Lord Salisbury to the American minister, the American chargé, and [Page LVII]the Russian minister, relative to a close time, up to April 23, 1888 On the 28th of April, 1888, the American chargé was informed that nothing could be done until Canada was heard from. Describes the efforts made by the American legation in London to complete the arrangement for a close time, terminating in September, 1888, in Lord Salisbury’s stating that the Canadian Government objected to any such restrictions, and that, until its consent could be obtained, the British Government was not willing to enter into the convention. Proceeds to show how subsequent negotiations between the Department and Sir Julian were broken off by the interposition of Canada. Contrasts the propositions made by Lord Salisbury in 1888 with those made by Sir Julian in 1890. The circumstances are the same, but the position of England has changed because the wishes of Canada have demanded the change. The close time proposed by Sir Julian leaves open the months of July, August, and September, during which the areas around the breeding islands are most crowded with seals, and especially with female seals going forth to secure food for their young, and whose destruction would involve the destruction of their young. The 10-mile limit would give the marauders the vantage ground for killing the seals that are in the water by tens of thousands, searching for food. The President proposes that the British Government agree not to permit the sealing vessels to enter Behring Sea this season, in order that time may be secured for negotiation. 425
Same to same June 2 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: The President is of the opinion that an arbitration can not be concluded in time for this season, and desires to know whether Lord Salisbury will make, for a single season, the regulation which in 1888 he offered to make permanent. 429
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. June 3 Same subject: The British Government is not prepared to agree to the regulation excluding British sealing vessels from Behring Sea during the present seal-fishery season, as, apart from other considerations, there would be no legal power to enforce its observance on British subjects and British vessels. 430
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. June 4 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: If Sir Julian’s suggestion that British sealing vessels be allowed to kill seals within 10 miles of the Pribylov Islands directly after the mothers are delivered of their young be granted, Behring Sea would swarm with sealing vessels throughout the summer months. The seal mothers, which require an area from 40 to 50 miles from the islands, would be slaughtered by hundreds of thousands, and there would soon be no seals in Behring Sea. Seal rookeries in all parts of the world have been destroyed in that way. Mr. Tingle, in his official report to the Treasury Department at the close of the season of 1887, states that not more than one seal out of every ten killed or mortally wounded is landed on the boats and skinned. The President is greatly disappointed that, even for the sake of securing an impartial arbitration of the matter, the British Government is not willing to suspend for a single season the practice which Lord Salisbury described in 1888 as “the wanton destruction of a valuable industry.” 430
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. June 6 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea. Has transmitted to Lord Salisbury a copy of Mr. Blaine’s note of the 4th instant. 432
Same to same June 9 Same subject: It is out of the power of the British Government to exclude British or Canadian vessels from any part of the high seas, without legislative sanction. Lord Salisbury does not think that he could have used the expressions attributed to him in the context mentioned. 433
[Page LVIII] Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. June 11 Same subject; It would satisfy the United States Government if Lord Salisbury would, by public proclamation, simply request that vessels sailing under the British flag will abstain from entering Behring Sea during the present season. This would give time for impartial negotiations. 433
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. June 11 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea; Has telegraphed to Lord Salisbury Mr. Blaine’s communication of this date. Trusts that instructions will be sent to the United States revenue cruisers to abstain from interference with British vessels. It is in that hope that he has delayed delivering the formal protest announced in his note of May 23. 434
Same to same June 14 Same subject Incloses his formal protest against any interference with the vessels of British subjects on the part of the United States revenue cruisers in Behring Sea. The British Government must hold that of the United States responsible for the consequences which may ensue from acts which are contrary to the established principles of international law. 435
Same to same June 27 Same subject: The British Government can only accede to the President’s request contained in Mr. Blaine’s note of the 11th instant on condition that the question of the legality of the action of the United States Government in Behring Sea in 1886, 1887, and 1889 be forthwith referred to arbitration; that pending the award all interference with British sealing vessels shall absolutely cease; and that the United States Government, if the award should be adverse to it on the question of legal right, will compensate British subjects for the losses which they may sustain by reason of their compliance with the British proclamation. 436
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. June 30 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: Lord Salisbury, in his dispatch of May 22, contends that Mr. John Quincy Adams, when Secretary of State, in a dispatch of July 23, 1823, to the United States minister at St. Petersburg, protested against the jurisdiction which Russia claimed over the waters of Behring Sea, and quotes Mr. Adams’s words. The quotation is most defective, erroneous, and misleading. Out of eighty-four words, thirty-five are dropped, and those dropped are precisely the words on which the United States Government founds its argument in this case. Mr. Adams says that Russian rights “are confined to certain islands north of the fity-fifth degree of latitude, and have no existence on the continent of America.” If taken literally there was no such thing as “Russian possessions in America.” Gives a review of certain public transactions and states certain facts, showing that Mr. Adams was drawing the distinction between the territory of “Americax” and the territory of the “Russian possessions,” “America “and the “United States” being then, as now, commonly used as synonymous. Quotes Mr. Adams’s diary under July 17, 1823, and President Monroe’s message of December 2, 1823, to prove that the whole dispute between the United States and Russia and between Great Britain and Russia related to the northwest coast between the “50th and the 60th degrees of north latitude.” Neither in the treaty of 1824 between the United States and Russia, nor in that of 1825 between Great Britain and Russia, was there any attempt at regulating or controlling, or even asserting an interest in, the Rusian possessions and Bering Sea, which lie far to the north and west of the territory which formed the basis of the contention. Gives the text of a memorandum handed by the American minister, Mr. Middleton, to Count Nesselrode, the Russian representative, at the fourth conference of the plenipotentiaries, March 8, 1824, and of the four principal articles of the treaty of 1824 [Page LIX]between Russia and the United States, showing the distinction made between the “Pacific Ocean” and “Behring Sea,” and between the “northwest coast” and the “Russian possessions.” Gives the text of articles III, VI, and VII of the treaty of 1825 between Russia and Great Britain, and argues to show that by that treaty Great Britain was excluded from all rivers emptying into Behring Sea, including the Yucon and the Porcupine, which rise and for a long distance flow in British America. Both the said treaties left untouched and unquestioned the ukase of 1821, in which the Emperor of Russia set forth clearly the rights Claimed and exercised by Russia in Behring Sea, and were therefore a practical renunciation, on the part of Great Britain and the United States, of any rights in the waters of Behring Sea during the period of Russian sovereignty. The ukase of 1821 did not declare Behring Sea to be “mare clausum,” but it did declare that the waters, to the extent of 100 miles from the shores, were reserved for the subjects of the Russian Empire. The treaties of 1843 and 1859 between Great Britain and Russia gave Great Britain no right to take fur seals in Behring Sea. They were, in fact, a prohibition upon her, which she respected as long as Alaska was a Russian province. Lord Salisbury quotes the case of the Loriot as having some bearing on the Behring Sea question. The Loriot was not arrested in Behring Sea, nor was she engaged in taking furs. She was arrested in latitude 54° 65″, on the “northwest coast,” to which, and to which only, the treaty of 1824 referred. Lord Salisbury says that the British vessels were engaged in capturing seals in Behring sea. The cases which he mentioned form just a sufficient number of exceptions to establish the fact that the destructive intrusion began in 1886. He does not attempt to cite the intrusion of a single British sealer into Behring Sea until after Alaska had been transferred to the United States. The questions, therefore, in Mr. Blaine’s note of January 22, 1890, still remain unanswered, viz: Whence did the ships of Canada derive the right to do, in 1886, that which they had refrained from doing for nearly 90 years? Upon what grounds did the British Government defend, in 1886, a course of conduct in Behring Sea which had been carefully avoided ever since the discovery of that sea? By what reasoning did the British Government conclude that an act may be committed with impunity against the rights of the United States, which had never been attempted against the same rights when held by Russia? 437
Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. June 30 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: Incloses a copy of a dispatch of the 20th instant from Lord Salisbury, stating facts and quoting correspondence to show that there is some error in Mr. Blaine’s impressions with regard to the negotiations in 1888, as given in Mr. Blaine’s note of May 29, 1890. 449
Same to same June 30 Same subject: Mr. Blaine states, in his note of the 4th instant, that Lord Salisbury abruptly closed the negotiations in 1888 because “the Canadian Government objected,” and that he “assigned no other reason whatever.” Lord Salisbury calls attention to a statement made to him by Mr. Phelps on the 3d of April, 1888, that, “under the peculiar political circumstances of America at this moment, with a general election impending, it would be of little use, and indeed hardly practicable, to conduct any negotiation to its issue before the election had taken place.” 451
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. July 2 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: Note of 27th ultimo received. An agreement to arbitrate requires careful consideration. British claims for injuries and losses would be included in the arbitration. [Page LX]The answer to the President’s request comes too late to proceed with the negotiation this season. 452
Same to same July 19 Same subject: Two notes of June 30 received. States facts and quotes correspondence showing that Mr. Blaine was warranted in stating in his note of May 29, 1890, that Lord Salisbury had given such “verbal assurances” to Mr. Phelps as justified the latter in expecting a convention to be concluded between Great Britain and the United States for the protection of the seal fisheries in Behring Sea. Quotes Lord Salisbury’s language of February 25, 1888, as given by Mr. Phelps, assenting to a close time between April 15 and November 1 each year, and promising to cause an act to be introduced in Parliament to give effect to that arrangement. Conference of April 16, 1888, between Lord Salisbury, the United States chargé, Mr. White, and the Russian ambassador, at which Lord Salisbury assured the latter that the protected area for seal life should be extended southward to the forty-seventh degree of north latitude, and promised to have a draft convention prepared for submission to the Russian ambassador and the American chargé. The United States is willing to consider all the proceedings of April 16, 1888, canceled; if Great Britain will adhere only to the agreement made between Lord Salisbury and Mr. Phelps February 25, 1888. Lord Salisbury makes a general denial of having given “verbal assurances,” but no special denial touching the agreement between himself and Mr. Phelps. Lord Salisbury gives Mr. Phelps’s remark of April 3, 1888, relative to the impending election, as one of the causes for closing the negotiations in 1888. This might be adduced as one of the reasons had not Lord Salisbury immediately proceeded with the negotiations, as shown by his note of April 6, 1888, to the American chargé, the conference of April 16, and subsequent correspondence. On the 28th of April Mr. White was informed that “neither act nor order could be drafted until Canada is heard from.” Lord Salisbury’s statement of September 12, 1888, to Mr. Phelps, that “the Canadian Government objected to any such restrictions, and that, until Canada’s consent could be obtained, Her Majesty’s Government was not willing to enter into the convention.” The President regards the interposition of the wishes of a British province to prevent the conclusion of a convention which had been virtually agreed upon, except as to details, as a grave injustice to the Government of the United States. 453
Lord Salisbury to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Aug. 2 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: States facts and quotes correspondence to show that the words omitted in his quotation from Mr. Adams’s dispatch of July 22, 1823, do not affect the point at issue. Cites the charter given by the Emperor Paul in 1799 to the Russian-American Company. It made no claim to exclusive jurisdiction over Behring Sea, nor were any measures taken under it to restrict foreign commerce, navigation, or fishing in that sea. Quotes sections 1 and 2 of the Russian ukase of September, 1821, reserving for Russian subjects exclusively all commerce, whaling, fishing, and other industries on the northwest coast, from Behring Strait to the fifty-first degree of north latitude, and prohibiting foreign vessels from approaching the coasts and islands belonging to Russia within less than 100 Italian miles. Protest of John Quincy Adams, February 25, 1822, against the said ukase, and his correspondence with the Russian minister at Washington on the subject. The attempt to exclude American vessels was at once resisted. No distinction made by the Russian Government between the Pacific Ocean and Behring Sea. It regarded [Page LXI]the Pacific Ocean as extending to Behring Strait. No reference on either side to any distinctive name for Behring Sea. Mr. Adams’s dispatch of July 22, 1823, to Mr. Middleton. Mr. Adams Clearly meant to deny that the Russian settlements or discoveries gave Russia any claim, as of right, to exclude the navigation or fishery of other nations from any part of the seas on the coast of America, and that her rights, in this respect, were limited to the territorial waters of certain islands of which she was in permanent and complete occupation. Draft of treaty between the United States and Russia. Mr. Adams’s dispatch of July 22, 1823, to Mr. Rusk, the American minister in London, stating that the United States can not renounce the right of carrying on trade with the natives throughout the northwest coast. Mr. Blaine says that, when Mr. Middleton declared that Russia had no right of exclusion between the fiftieth and sixtieth degrees of north latitude, he intended to make a distinction between Behring Sea and the Pacific Ocean, but the sixtieth degree strikes straight across Behring Sea, leaving by far the larger and more important part of it to the south. Mr. Blaine’s construction of the treaty of 1824 between the United States and Russia is an entirely novel one. Dissents from his interpretation of article 7 of the treaty of 1825 between Great Britain and Russia. It referred to all the possessions of the two powers on the northwest coast of America. Separate article relating to the rights of the Russian-American Company. Its context precludes the interpretation that it was meant to recognize the objectionable claim contained in the ukase of 1821. Explanatory memorandum received from the Russian ambassador on the subject in December, 1842. The right of Russia to exclude foreign vessels from her coasts and islands, within a distance of 100 miles, was never admitted nor enforced. Cites Wheaton, Kent, Calvo, Mr. Seward, and Mr. Fish to show that the maritime jurisdiction of a country only extends to the distance of a marine league from the coast. Instructions given by Mr. George Canning to Mr. Stratford Canning, December 8, 1824, to require a stipulation, in the treaty then being negotiated with Russia, of the right of British subjects to navigate freely in the Pacific. Mr. Stratford Canning’s dispatch of March 1, 1825, stating that the Emperor of Russia had no intention of maintaining any exclusive claim to the navigation of Bering Strait or of the seas to the north of it. These extracts prove that Great Britain refused to admit any part of the Russian claim asserted by the ukase of 1821, from Behring Strait to the fifty-first parallel; that the convention of 1825 was regarded on both sides as a renunciation on the part of Russia of that claim in its entirety; and that though Behring Strait was known and specifically provided for, Behring Sea was not known by that name, but was regarded as part of the Pacific Ocean. The British Government has always claimed the freedom of navigation and fishing in the waters of Behring Sea. It is impossible to admit that a public right can be held to be abandoned by a nation from the mere fact that, for a certain number of years, it has not suited the Subjects of that nation to exercise it. The British Government is willing to concede to the United States the same jurisdiction in Behring Sea that she conceded to Russia, and to agree that the whole question be referred to arbitration, as to the legality of the recent captures in that sea. Incloses copies of correspondence relative to the ukase of 1821 and the treaty of 1825 between Great Britain and Russia. 456
[Page LXII] Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Blaine. Nov. 18 Zanzibar: Incloses a copy of an official notice proclaiming the British protectorate over the dominions of the Sultanate of Zanzibar. 476
Mr. Blaine to Sir Julian Pauncefote. Dec. 17 Seal fisheries in Behring Sea: Insists upon the correctness and validity of the position taken by the United States Government. Lord Salisbury contends that the phrase “Pacific Ocean,” as used in the treaties of 1824 and 1825, was intended to include Behring Sea. The United States contends that Behring Sea was not mentioned, nor even referred to, in either treaty, and was in no sense included in the phrase “Pacific Ocean.” Lord Salisbury assumes that the “northwest coast” has but one meaning, and that it includes the whole coast stretching northward to Behring Strait. The United States contends that the “northwest coast” means, by long prescription, the coast of the Pacific Ocean south of the Alaskan Peninsula, or south of the sixtieth degree of north latitude, between the forty-second and the sixtieth parallels. Refers to H. H. Bancroft’s map of the northwest coast. Quotes the first article of the treaties of 1824 and 1825. Agrees with Lord Salisbury that throughout the whole correspondence relating to the treaties, there was no reference by either side to any distinctive name for Behring Sea, for the reason that the negotiations had no reference to Behring Sea, but were confined to a “strip of land” on the northwest coast and the waters of the Pacific Ocean adjacent thereto. Behring Sea appeared on many authentic maps several years before the two treaties, sometimes called Sea of Kamschatka. (Map of 1784; Gvosdef’s map of 1732; Muller’s map of 1761.) If Behring Sea had been included in the treaties, it is impossible to conceive that it would have been omitted in Mr. Adams’s and Mr. G. Canning’s instructions, and escaped the notice of the plenipotentiaries. Russia practically withdrew the operation of the ukase of 1821 from the waters of the northwest coast on the Pacific Ocean, but there is conclusive proof that it was left in full force over the waters of Behring Sea. Great profits made by the Russian-American Company. Quotes Bancroft’s History of Alaska, showing that that company enjoyed a monopoly of the sealing and fishing in Behring Sea up to 1867, when Alaska was sold to the United States. The 100-mile limit was steadily observed by all the nations that sent vessels to Behring Sea. Not a seal taken in Behring Sea by any foreign vessel prior to 1867. No protest made by Great Britain against the Russian monopoly. Second articles of the two treaties. Treaty of 1818 between the United States and Great Britain, showing the meaning and acceptation of the phrase “northwest coast,” in accordance with the American contention. Mr. Adams’s instruction of July 22, 1823, to Mr. Middleton. Memorandum submitted by Mr. Middleton to Count Nesselrode, asserting that Russia had not the right of dominion “upon the continent of America between the fiftieth and sixtieth degrees of north latitude.” The fact that the sixtieth parallel “strikes straight across the Behring Sea” has no pertinence to this discussion. There is a continuous coast line between the fiftieth and sixtieth degrees on the Pacific Ocean, but not on Behring Sea. Mr. Middleton referred only to the coast south of Behring Sea. At the time the treaties were negotiated the only trading vessels which had entered Behring Sea were those of the Russian Fur Company. Third article of the British treaty of 1825. The only coast referred to in this article was the strip of land south of 60 degrees. Discusses the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh articles of the same treaty. Greater caution of Russia in the treaty of 1825 than in that of 1824. Reasons [Page LXIII]therefor. Explanatory note from Russia excepting the Russian possessions down to 59° 30′ from the provisions; of the treaty of 1824 and drawing the distinction between the Sea of Kamschatka and the Pacific Ocean. This explanatory note disproves and denies in detail Lord Salisbury’s three assertions at the close of his dispatch of August 2, 1890. Discusses the inclosures to that dispatch and gives extracts showing that they confirm the view taken by the United States and refer to the Pacific Ocean and northwest coast south of the sixtieth degree. Lord Salisbury asserts that maritime jurisdiction extends only a marine league from the coast. In 1816 the British Parliament passed a law prohibiting all vessels from hovering within 8 leagues of the coast of St. Helena under penalty of confiscation. Cites the pearl fisheries of Australia, where Great Britain exerts control over a part of the ocean 600 miles wide. The President will ask the British Government to agree to the distance of 20 marine leagues, within which no vessel shall hover around the islands of St. Paul and St. George, from May 15 to October 15 of each year. States facts showing the injury already done to the seal fisheries. British offer of arbitration not satisfactory. States the questions which the President wishes to refer to arbitration. The United States has never claimed that Behring Sea was mare clausum, and disavows it. Mr. Phelps’s dispatch of September 12, 1888. Incloses copies of documents. 477

greece.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
23 Mr. Snowden to Mr. Blaine. 1890. Jan. 24 Joint stock companies: The prime minister says that the agreement authorizing joint stock companies incorporated in the United States and Greece to enjoy all the rights and privileges granted to the citizens and subjects of each country has been duly considered and will be executed by the Hellenic Government within a few days. 509
28 Same to same Feb. 14 Same subject: Incloses a protocol of conference held on the 10th instant with the minister of foreign affairs, at which it was agreed that joint stock companies in Greece and the United States may exercise in the territory of the other the rights and privileges of subjects and citizens of the two countries, under article I of the treaty of 1837. 509
30 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Snowden. Mar. 21 Same subject: Has approved the protocol accompanying his No. 28, of the 4th ultimo, and had it printed. 511
40 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Snowden. Sept. 18 Military service of Emmanuel C. Catechi, an American citizen: States the circumstances connected with Catechi’s conscription by the Greek authorities; instructs Mr. Snowden to ask his immediate release, and that steps be taken to prevent his being further molested. Incloses copies of correspondence. 511
41 Same to same Sept. 19 Same subject: Instructs him to investigate the circumstances of Catechi’s residence in Greece, whether indicating permanent stay or an intention to return to the United States. 513
60 Mr. Snowden to Mr. Blaine. Oct. 18 Same subject: Incloses a copy of his note of the 18th ultimo to the minister of foreign affairs, requesting Catechi’s release. Has not yet received a reply. 514
67 Same to same Nov. 17 Same subject: Gives details with regard to Catechi’s residence in Greece. Catechi says that he intends to return to the United States within a reasonable time. 515
[Page LXIV]68 Mr. Snowdon to Mr. Blaine Nov. 26 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a note of the 19th ultimo from the minister of foreign affairs, declining to release Catechi on the ground that the latter could not change his nationality before attaining his majority and obtaining the permission of the Greek Government. Incloses also a copy of his note of November 26 to the minister of foreign affairs, restating the facts and arguments in the case. 516
71 Same to same Dec. 17 Same subject: Catechi will probably be released. 519
73 Same to same Dec. 25 Same subject: Orders have been issued for Catechi’s release. 520

haiti.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
31 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine. 1890. Jan. 17 Election of members of the Legislative Assembly now in progress. 521
45 Same to same Mar. 13 Right of asylum: Incloses a copy of a note from the minister of foreign affairs, requesting a list of the persons who have taken refuge at the legation, and of his reply of the 7th instant stating that there were none. 521
38 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass. Mar. 27 Same subject: Mr. Douglass would not be authorized to furnish the Haitien Government with a list of fugitives under his protection, had there been any. Gives reasons. 523
59 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 25 Political situation described: President Hyppolite’s popularity increasing. 523
48 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass. May 8 Same subject: Is glad to hear that the outlook is favorable. 524
69 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine. May 28 Political: Opening of the Legislature on the 26th instant described. 524
70 Same to same May 28 Good offices exerted by Mr. Douglass in favor of Sultzer Wart, a Swiss banker, who has been expelled from Haiti. He failed to procure a revocation of his expulsion, but obtained an extension of the time for a few days. 525
71 Same to same May 30 Expulsion of J. R. Love and Sultzer Wart from Haiti: Incloses a copy and translation of a decree of the 26th instant ordering the same. 526
72 Same to same May 30 Martial law: Incloses a copy and translation of a decree of the 28th instant abolishing martial law at Port-au-Prince. 527
52 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass. June 12 Good offices in behalf of Sultzer Wart: Approves Mr. Douglass’s action in the case. 527
77 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine. June 13 Closed ports: Incloses a copy of a note of the 7th instant from the minister of foreign affairs, complaining of the entrance of two American schooners, Baltic and Rising Sun, into the closed port of Grand-Gosier about the end of March, and asking that steps be taken to prevent a recurrence of such violation of the law, and a copy of his reply of the 10th instant promising to take such steps. 528
80 Same to same June 27 Political situation: Public confidence increasing; the national currency appreciating; improvements in Port-au-Prince; a large coffee crop expected. 529
60 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Douglass July 2 Closed ports: Approves the general tenor of his reply of June 10 to the minister of foreign affairs. 530
85 Mr. Douglass to Mr. Blaine July 9 Political: Incloses a translation of that part of President Hyppolite’s message of the 9th ultimo which treats of the relations of Haiti with foreign powers; comments on the message. 530
[Page LXV]

italy.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
55 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Porter 1890. May 3 Claim of Nicolino Mileo, a naturalized citizen of the United States, against Italy: Incloses documents showing that Mileo was born in Italy in 1860; that he was brought to the United States in 1870 by his father, who was an Italian subject; that he has resided in New York ever since; that he has been engaged in business there for the last 15 years; that he was married in New York; that his wife, Gaetana, was and is a citizen of the United States; that he was duly naturalized in 1884; that his father resided in the United States from 1870 until 1882, during which time he declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States; that his father returned to Italy to reside in 1882; that some time prior to April 1, 1889, one Albino Calasa, a cousin of Mileo’s, and an Italian subject, died, leaving Mileo, by his will, certain real estate in the town of Spinoso, Italy, valued at $800 to $1,000; that Mileo and his wife sailed for Italy April 1, 1889, to take possession of said property; that they arrived at Spinoso April 17; that on the 22d of April, in spite of his protests and the papers proving his American citizenship, he was pressed into the Italian army; that on the 23d of April he was taken to Alessandria, where he was confined for 30 days in jail, under circumstances of great hardship, for having failed to return to Italy to “perform military service; that he was thereafter compelled to servo 5½ months in the Italian army; that at the end of that time, having obtained leave of absence, he went to Genoa and left Italy on a vessel bound for Zanzibar, whence he returned to the United States via Marseilles. He alleges that the Italian authorities will not permit his wife to come to him and threaten to detain her in Italy until he returns there. Instructs Mr. Porter to ask for a prompt and thorough investigation of the case and to state the expectation of the United States Government that, should Mileo’s allegations be substantiated, the action of the Italian authorities will be disavowed. Discusses the points involved. The action of the Italian authorities calls now, as on previous occasions, for earnest dissent and protest. Regrets that Italy stands aloof from the repeated proposals of the United States to adjust the question of military service by a treaty on well-established bases. If it is true that Mrs. Mileo is coerced into remaining in Italy, Mr. Porter must make instant and earnest protest. 536
93 Mr. Porter to Mr. Blaine June 11 Same subject: Will present the case to foreign office next, when he will urge the adoption of amendments to our treaties in relation to the subjects of naturalization and extradition of offenders. 547
101 Same to same July 9 Same subject: Has written to the minister of foreign affairs, stating the case and requesting an investigation. Has also had an interview with him. He asserted that the story of the detention of Mileo’s wife would prove to have no foundation in truth. 548
72 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Porter. July 29 Claim of Nicolino Mileo: No. 101 received. Awaits a further report. 548
114 Mr. Dougherty to Mr. Blaine. Sept. 1 Same subject: Incloses a copy of Mr. Porter’s note of June 23, 1890, to the minister of foreign affairs, setting forth the circumstances, and a copy and translation of the reply of the 22d ultimo, denying that Mrs. Mileo had been detained in Italy, and stating that she had sailed for New York on the 31stof May, with a passport issued to her on the 6th of May; that, in 1884, when Mileo acquired American citizenship, he was already guilty of contumacy; that he presented himself voluntarily to the enlistment bureau May 22, 1889, and was enrolled; that he joined his regiment May 27 and remained with it until November 15, when, having obtained a 15 days’ leave, he went to Naples, whence he [Page LXVI]fled to the United States, arriving in New York about December 12, 1889; that, prior to his desertion, the only punishment to which he was sentenced was 1 month’s imprisonment for contumacy, which he would not have had to undergo until the time of his discharge; that this shows how unfounded are his assertions as to his ill treatment, his incarceration, and his escape from the prisons of Alessandria; that it was Mileo’s duty to present himself for enrollment on reaching the age of conscription; and that, by article 12 of the Italian code, he was subject to military duty in spite of the acquisition of a new nationality, which, moreover, he had acquired when he was already guilty of contumacy; that he was inscribed on the conscription list of the Kingdom, and in fact, enrolled. 548
79 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Dougherty. Sept. 19 Claim of Nicolino Mileo: No. 114 received. Signor Damiani admits that Mileo was imprisoned 1 month prior to his desertion and to his 5½ months’ service. The United States Government can not but regard such punishment as harsh and inequitable under the circumstances. Signor Damiani denies the detention of Mileo’s wife; but the lateness of the date of her passport is not wholly inconsistent with the statement that her repeated endeavors—begun before the birth of her child to obtain permission to depart had met with refusal. 552
134 Mr. Porter to Mr. Blaine Nov. 7 Claim of Nicolino Mileo: No. 79 received. Interview of the 6th instant with Signor Damiani. The latter did not say, in his note of August 22, that Mileo had been imprisoned for a month, but that he had been sentenced to suffer a month’s imprisonment, which was, however, not to be inflicted until the period of his becoming entitled to “unlimited leave,” and that, Mileo having escaped before that time, no punishment had been undergone. The Italian Government denies that any obstacles were at any time interposed to Mrs. Mileo’s departure for the United States. 553
99 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Porter Nov. 26 Claim of Nicolino Mileo: Cancels that part of Department’s No. 79, of September 19, relating to the month’s imprisonment. 553

correspondence with the legation of italy at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine 1890. Mar. 19 Extradition of Vincenzo Villella and Giuseppe Bevivino: Incloses for transmission two letters rogatory relating to the trial of Villella and Bevivino in Italy. 554
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava Mar. 21 Same subject: Has forwarded the letters rogatory. Reserves the right, which the United States Government thinks that it possesses, to have the fugitives surrendered for trial in the place where their offenses were committed. Has forwarded the letters rogatory in order that the ends of justice may not, if possible, be entirely defeated. The United States demanded the surrender of the two fugitives more than a year ago. Italy declined to surrender them, on the ground that they were Italian subjects. The treaties require the surrender of persons generally, and make no exception in favor of citizens or subjects. 554
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Apr. 20 Same subject: Note of 21st ultimo received. It is for the very purpose of preventing the ends of justice being defeated that Bevivino and Villella are now imprisoned in Italy and that the letters rogatory have been sent. Requests the speedy transmission of the documents asked for in the said letters rogatory. The question of the extradition of Italian subjects by Italy has been fully discussed and entirely settled [Page LXVII]between the Italian ministry of foreign affairs and the United States legation at Rome. According to Italian law no citizen can be removed from the jurisdiction of his natural judges, those of his own country. The extradition of a citizen is not admissible under the Italian penal code. This principle has not only become a part of the public law of Europe, but has been recognized by the United States in its extradition treaties with Austria-Hungary, Baden, Bavaria, Belgium, Hayti, Mexico, the Netherlands, Turkey, Prussia, Germany, Spain, Sweden and Norway, and Salvador. It can not be claimed, on the ground of the absence in the treaty between Italy and the United States of an express reservation in favor of natives of the two countries, that Italy has renounced a doctrine which is based upon her own laws and her own public law. The Italian Government is therefore justified in declaring that neither the spirit of the Italian law nor the text of the treaty would permit it to comply with the request for the extradition of Bevivino and Villella. There is no ground for the inference from the foregoing that the guilty parties would escape punishment. They have been arrested, are now in prison, and their trial would now have been ended if the Pennsylvania courts had forwarded the papers asked for early in 1889. 555
Same to same June 5 Extradition of Vincenzo Villella and Giuseppe Bevivino: Requests the speedy transmission of the papers asked for in the letters rogatory accompanying his note of March 19, 1890. 557
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava June 13 Extradition of Vincenzo Villella and Giuseppe Bevivino: Returns the letters rogatory which had been forwarded to the governor of New York and sent back by him with directions as to their execution. Advises that they be sent to the Italian consul at New York. 558
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine June 16 Same subject: Has instructed the Italian consul-general at New York to take the necessary steps. 558
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava June 23 Same subject: Reply to note of April 20. The question at issue is not one of Italian law, but of an international compact between the United States and Italy. Is surprised that the Italian Government regards the question as settled by the ministry of foreign affairs and the. United States legation. Mr. Stallo protested against the position taken by the Italian Government. Gives a history of the case of Sal vatore Paladini. Reviews the negotiations in the case of Villella and Bevivino. Adduces arguments and cites authorities to show that the refusal of the Italian Government to surrender Paladini, Villella, and Bevivino, under the treaty of 1868, is not justified by the principles of international law. The present situation seems to require either the denunciation of the treaty of 1868, or the conclusion of new stipulations with regard to the extradition of citizens. 559
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine July 3 Same subject: Has communicated note of June 23 to his Government. Says there must have been some mistake respecting the statement of the Italian consul at Philadelphia that the Italian Government would grant the extradition of Villella and Bevivino. 567
Mr. Wharton to Baron Fava. July 29 Same subject: Has again urged the governor of Pennsylvania to expedite the transmission of the documents needed. 567
Same to same Aug. 1 Same subject: The local authorities at Wilkes Barre have been directed by the governor of Pennsvlvania to forward the papers. 568
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Aug. 8 Extradition and naturalization: Incloses a copy of a dispatch of the 27th ultimo, from the Italian foreign office, stating that in January, 1889, the American minister at Rome, Mr. Stallo, had commenced negotiations with a view to the adoption of an additional article to the extradition convention of 1868 between Italy and [Page LXVIII]the United States, the object of said article being the prohibition of the surrender by each state of its own subjects or citizens; and the signing of a convention of naturalization by the two countries, such as would be rendered necessary by the new article, and similar to that existing between the United States and Belgium; that the Italian Government received this proposition favorably and on the 27th of April, 1889, addressed a note to Mr. Stallo, accepting his proposition in general, but proposing a few modifications in his draft, and an addition to the article relative to extradition. Incloses a copy of said note of April 27, 1889, and requests a reply to the counter propositions made therein. 568
Mr. Wharton to Baron Fava. Aug. 12 Extradition of Vincenzo Villella and Giuseppe Bevivino: The district attorney of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, is now trying to find two witnesses whose testimony is indispensable. 571
Baron Fava to Mr. Blaine Oct. 7 Same subject: Again asks the good offices of the Department to procure the necessary documents from Pennsylvania. 571
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava Oct. 20 Same subject: The governor of Pennsylvania has again called upon the authorities of Luzerne County to expedite the execution of the letters rogatory. 572
Mr. Adee to Baron Fava Oct. 28 Same subject: Two of the most important witnesses not yet found. 572
Mr. Blaine to Baron Fava Nov. 13 Same subject: The district attorney of Luzerne County hopes to have the testimony of witnesses ready for transmission in a few days. 572
Same to same Nov. 18 Extradition and naturalization: Reply to note of August 8. Can not regard the note of April 27, 1889, as satisfactory. The purport of the proposed article seems to be that, while citizenship is recognized as a ground for refusing extradition, citizenship by naturalization can not confer the right to demand it; the only effect conceded to naturalization is that, when joined with a subsequent residence of 5 years, it may afford a ground to withhold extradition. The United States Government can not assent to the stipulation that it shall agree to the enforcement against its citizens, if they set foot in Italy, of those provisions of the Italian code which relate to the punishment of foreigners for acts committed outside of Italy. The language of the note is not entirely explicit as to military service, but it is not understood to mean that a person who, having been naturalized as a citizen of the United States, owes allegiance and duty to that country, is at the same time to continue to owe the allegiance and duty of a subject to the King of Italy. Incloses a copy of the second article of the naturalization treaty of September 20, 1870, between the United States and Austria–Hungary. 572

japan.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
80 Mr. Swift to Mr. Blaine 1890. Jan. 3 Medals and brevets presented by the Japanese Government to certain American citizens: Incloses a copy of a note of the 18th ultimo, from the foreign office, transmitting medals and brevets conferred by the Emperor on certain members and ex-members of the legation. Has forwarded those intended for Mr. Hubbard and Mr. Mansfield. Asks for instructions concerning those intended for Mr. Dun and Dr. Whitney. 575
88 Same to same Feb. 5 Taxes levied upon the sale of “Scott’s Emulsion:” The China and Japan Trading Company, in 1887, made arrangements for placing upon the Japanese market an American preparation [Page LXIX]of cod-liver oil, known as “Scott’s Emulsion,” and expended several thousand dollars in advertising it. In 1889 they arranged with Japanese retail merchants for its sale, and began selling. The sales were very satisfactory. Soon afterwards the Japanese authorities notified the native merchants that they must each take out a special license for the sale of “Scott’s Emulsion.” The American importers, to avoid delay and trouble, instructed the native merchants to take out the license, and applied to Mr. Swift to obtain a revocation of the order. He accordingly wrote to the foreign office September 13, 1889, relating the facts and stating that, in his opinion, the requirement of the license was a violation of the treaty of July 29, 1858. Subsequently the agent of the China and Japan Trading Company informed Mr. Swift that the Japanese merchants engaged in selling “Scott’s Emulsion” had been required to pay an excise tax of 10 per cent, ad valorem upon the retail price of each bottle; that they had thereupon returned the stock on hand to the importers and ceased to sell the article. On the 4th of October, 1889, Mr. Swift wrote to the foreign office asking for a reply to his note of September 13 and calling attention to the excise tax of 10 per cent, demanded on the price of each bottle of “Scott’s Emulsion.” The foreign office replied January 17, 1890, contending that, under the treaty of 1858, the Japanese Government had the right to require the license and to levy the excise tax. Incloses a memorandum of his conversation of January 23, 1890, with the minister of foreign affairs and copies of correspondence. 577
91 Same to same Feb. 16 Taxes levied on “Scott’s Emulsion:” Incloses a copy of a note of the 6th instant, from the minister of foreign affairs, transmitting a memorandum of his conversation of January 23 with Mr. Swift; and a copy of Mr. Swift’s reply of the 10th instant, transmitting a memorandum pointing out certain errors in Viseount Aoki’s memorandum. 586
106 Same to same Mar. 18 Rope made of human hair: Sends, for transmission to the Smithsonian Institution, a section of a rope made of human hair, used in the construction of a Buddhist temple at Kioto, and a photograph of the rolls of cable still remaining at the temple. Incloses a copy of a letter on the subject from V. Marshall Law, dated 6th instant. 592
59 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Swift Mar. 18 Taxes levied upon “Scott’s Emulsion:” Discusses the questions involved; approves his protest; is compelled to regard the action of the Japanese Government as a clear and substantial violation of the provisions of the treaty of 1858. Reply to No. 88. 594
61 Same to same Mar. 20 Medals and brevets presented by the Japanese Government to certain American citizens: Section 9, article 1, of the Constitution provides that no person holding any office of profit or trust under the Government shall, without the consent of Congress, accept any present, emolument, office, or title from any king, prince, or foreign state; section 3 of the act of January 31, 1881, provides that any such present, decoration, or other thing shall be tendered through the Department of State. Reply to No. 80. 598
63 Same to same Mar. 21 Taxes levied upon “Scott’s Emulsion:” No. 91 received. The differences between Mr. Swift’s and Viscount Aoki’s memoranda of their interview of January 23, do not involve the merits of the question at issue. 599
111 Mr. Swift to Mr. Blaine Apr. 8 Military and naval maneuvers from the 30th ultimo to the 4th instant described. 599
66 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Swift Apr. 17 Rope made of human hair: Received and sent to the Smithsonian Institution. Instructs him to convey the thanks of the Government to the Buddhist priests and to Mr. V. M. Law. Reply to No. 106. 602
[Page LXX]120 Mr. Swift to Mr. Blaine May 20 Taxes levied upon “Scott’s Emulsion:” Has sent to the foreign office a copy of Mr. Blaine’s No. 59 of March 18. 602
81 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Swift June 12 Same subject: No. 120 received. No occasion to renew representations, unless the Japanese Government continues to tax the article and without submitting a reply to the views of the Department. 603
129 Mr. Swift to Mr. Blaine July 7 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a note of the 5th instant from the minister of foreign affairs, stating that he had instructed the Japanese chargé at Washington to communicate the further views of the Japanese Government to Mr. Blaine. 603
146 Same to same Aug. 15 Political: Describes the elections for members of the Diet on the 1st ultimo. Incloses a clipping headed “Political parties in the Diet,” and a copy of the law of July 25, 1890, relative to meetings and political associations. 604

correspondence with the legation of japan at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Sato to Mr. Blaine 1890. Mar. 7 Taxes levied in Japan upon “Scott’s Emulsion:” States the facts in the case and gives a history of the correspondence between the United States minister at Tokio and the minister of foreign affairs on the subject. Argues to show that the said taxes are not an infringement of the treaty of 1858. The Japanese Government will, however, abolish the taxes if it can be conclusively shown that it is mistaken in its opinion. 611
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Sato Mar. 18 Same subject: The arguments contained in his note of the 7th instant do not remove the Department’s impression that the levying of the taxes in question is a direct violation of the treaties. The United States minister at Tokio has been instructed to make a full communication of the views of the United States Government to the minister of foreign affairs. 615
Mr. Sato to Mr. Blaine July 28 Same subject: Incloses a copy of an instruction of the 5th instant from the minister of foreign affairs, stating facts and adducing arguments to show that neither the requirement of the license nor the levying of the excise tax is an infringement of the treaty of 1858. 615

mexico.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
179 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine 1889. Dec. 5 Arrest of Captain Stilphen of the American schooner Robert Ruff: Incloses copies of correspondence on the subject. 620
184 Same to same Dec. 7 Same subject: Stilphen is out on bail. Incloses a copy of his note of this date to the minister of foreign affairs, stating that an American citizen named Patton, charged with assault and battery at Coatzacoalcos, boarded the Robert Ruff at sea, outside of the jurisdiction of Mexico; that a boat, containing certain persons in citizens’ clothes, approached the schooner, and that one of the persons, speaking in Spanish and exhibiting a paper, apparently solicited the surrender of fatten; that Captain Stilphen paid no attention to the request and kept the schooner on her course; and that on his return to Coatzacoalcos he was arrested on the charge of aiding a criminal to escape; that the United States Government is of the opinion that, upon the facts stated, there is no ground for Captain Stilphen’s detention, and that he should be set at liberty without delay. 622
[Page LXXI]186 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine Dec. 11 Arrest of Captain Stilphen: Incloses a copy and translation of a note of the 10th instant from the minister of foreign affairs, stating that he had asked for additional information in the case. 623
211 Same to same 1890. Jan. 21 Imprisonment of R. C. Work at Ciudad Victoria for the murder of Francisco Cruz. Incloses copies of correspondence in the case. 623
215 Same to same Jan. 22 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 14th instant from the United States consular agent at Ciudad Victoria, stating that the judge has informed him that Work’s case was closed, and that he would be sentenced in a few days. 627
238 Same to same Feb. 7 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence on the subject. 628
241 Same to same Feb. 10 Arrest of Capt. J. H. Stilphen: Incloses copies of correspondence in the case. 630
202 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Ryan Feb. 18 Imprisonment of R. C. Work: A disinterested medical statement of Mr. Work’s physical condition is desirable. 630
206 Same to same Feb. 20 Arrest of Capt. J. H. Stilphen: No. 241 received. Approves his note of the 10th instant to the minister of foreign affairs. 630
255 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine Mar. 5 Arrest of Capt. J. H. Stilphen: The Mexican Government insists that Captain Stilphen’s vessel was only 2½ miles from the coast when he aided the escape of Joseph Patton. Incloses conies of correspondence. 632
264 Same to same Mar. 15 Claim of Shadrack White: Mexican Government has agreed to the appointment of two competent surgeons to report upon the extent and character of the injuries sustained by White. Mr. Ryan has designated Dr. Paul Clendenin, assistant surgeon, U. S. Army. 632
224 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Ryan Mar. 24 Same subject: The Department awaits the development of the disputed questions of fact. Reply to No. 255. 633
235 Same to same Apr. 23 Claim of Howard C. Walker against Mexico for insults and injuries undergone by him at the hands of Mexican authorities: Incloses a letter of the 18th instant from M. F. Morris, urging the settlement of the said claim. 633
290 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine May 2 Imprisonment of R. C. Work: Wrote to the minister of foreign affairs on the 30th ultimo, requesting that Work may be removed from the jail to some place where proper medical treatment may be secured for him. Incloses copies of correspondence. 635
297 Same to same May 20 Claim of Shadrack white against Mexico for injuries inflicted upon him by Mexican soldiers at Eagle Pass, Tex., in March, 1888: Describes negotiations ending in the payment by the Mexican Government of $7,000 in gold in full settlement of the said claim. Incloses draft for $7,000 and copies of documents and correspondence in the case. 641
298 Same to same May 21 Claim of Howard C. Walker: Incloses a copy of his note of the 15th instant to the foreign office, recalling attention to the said claim. 641
300 Same to same May 21 Imprisonment of R. C. Work: Work was sentenced on the 12th instant to labor on the public works for 4 years 5 months and 10 days; the sentence to commence from January, 1889. Incloses copies of correspondence. 641
255 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Ryan May 29 Claim of Shadrack White: Appreciates highly Mr. Ryan’s effective efforts in the case. Reply to No. 297. 642
330 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine June 25 Claim of Howard C. Walker: Incloses a copy and translation of a note of the 12th instant from the foreign office, stating that, pursuant to a report made April 18, 1887, the Mexican Government was not responsible for damages in the premises. 643
333 Same to same June 27 Real estate in Mexico: The Mexican Government has determined to issue no permits hereafter to foreigners to buy real estate near the frontier until there shall have been a final adjustment of the boundary between the United States and Mexico. 644
[Page LXXII] Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 24 War between Guatemala and Salvador: He has been informed unofficially by the foreign office that Mexico will maintain a rigid neutrality, but will use her good offices to establish peace. 644
350 Same to same July 24 Telegrams between the Department and the United States minister in Central America: Reports the transmission of the said telegrams. 644
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). July 26 War between Guatemala and Salvador: Instructs him to report all that he can learn on the subject, and the reason why Department’s instructions to the United States minister in Central America fail to reach Mr. Mizner. 645
Mr. Adee to Mr. Ryan (telegram). July 27 Interception of telegrams: Instructs him to coöperate with the United States minister in Central America in investigating the causes of the stoppage of communication between Washington and Central America. 645
Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 27 War between Guatemala and Salvador: Reports recent events. 645
Same to same (telegram) July 27 Interception of telegrams: Salvador seems to be responsible for the interruption of correspondence between the Department and the United States minister in Central America; has demanded of the special agent of Salvador in Mexico that the rights of the United States be respected. 646
Same to same (telegram) July 28 Seizure of arms oh the American steamer Colima by the Guatemalan authorities: Gives an extract from a telegram of the 25th instant shown him by the Guatemalan minister justifying the seizure. 646
Same to same (telegram) July 29 War between Guatemala and Salvador: The special agent of Salvador informs him that the Salvador troops have been victorious in every battle and now hold a position in Guatemala, but that Salvador desires the friendly offices of the United States for the restoration of peace. 647
Same to same (telegram) July 29 Interception of telegrams: The President of Salvador has wired his special agent in Mexico: “I have ordered telegrams of Mexican and, American Governments to be passed, but lines in Guatemala are broken.” 647
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). July 29 War between Guatemala and Salvador: Mr. Mizner was wired on the 20th instant to tender good offices, but no reply has been received from him. Action upon Mexican proposition must be delayed until Mizner can be reached. 647
Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). July 29 Interception of telegrams: Gives directions for sending telegrams to Mr. Mizner. 647
Same to same (telegram) July 30 Interception of telegrams: The Guatemalan minister assures him that the Guatemalan Government in no way interferes with either official or other correspondence. 648
353 Same to same July 30 War between Guatemala and Salvador: Incloses a copy of a memorandum of the 26th instant from the foreign office, stating that Mexico would maintain a strict neutrality, but is ready to unite with the United States in mediating between the belligerents. 648
355 Same to same July 30 Same subject: Incloses copies of telegrams 649
357 Same to same July 30 Seizure of arms on the Colima: Incloses a copy of a telegram of the 25th instant from the Guatemalan minister of foreign affairs to the Guatemalan minister in Mexico justifying the seizure. 650
360 Same to same July 30 War between Guatemala and Salvador: The special agent of the Government of Salvador requested, on the 29th instant, that the United States would use its good offices for the restoration of peace. 651
361 Same to same July 31 Same subject: Has notified the foreign office that action upon the Mexican proposition with regard to mediation must be postponed until communication can be had with the United States minister in Central America. 651
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). Aug. 11 Same subject: Instructs him to inform the Mexican Government that Mr. Mizner has been directed to use his good offices with Guatemala and Salvador; that the United States would be pleased to coöperate with the Mexican Government, but that it prefers independent action to joint action. 651
[Page LXXIII] Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). Aug. 15 Same subject: Instructs him to wire Mr. Mizner to confer with the Mexican minister at Guatemala, in order that there may be concert in the good offices of each for the restoration of peace. 652
387 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine Aug. 19 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence relative to the good offices of the United States and Mexico. 652
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 22 Same subject: The special agent of Salvador is instructed to convey to Mr. Blaine, through Mr. Ryan, the desire of Salvador to have the United States propose to Guatemala that the difficulty be submitted to arbitration. 653
Same to same (telegram) Aug. 22 Same subject: The special agent of Salvador states that General Ezeta rejects the conditions of peace proposed by Mr. Mizner, as they require his resignation in favor of Dr. Ayala, whom he considers a traitor to his country. Ezeta will consent to any proposition of peace involving a fair election by the people of Salvador. 653
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Ryan (telegram). Aug. 25 Same subject: Instructs him to wire Mr. Mizner to propose arbitration to the Guatemalan Government. 654
Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine (telegram). Aug. 26 Same subject: Has communicated to Mr. Mizner Department’s instruction of the 25th instant. 654
398 Same to same Aug. 30 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence on the subject. 654
375 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Ryan Oct. 22 Chinese immigration from Mexico and Canada: Instructs him to sound the Mexican Government as to its willingness to enter into negotiations with a view to prevent Chinese laborers from entering the United States from Mexico. 655
471 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine Nov. 1 Same subject: Has spoken on the subject to the minister of foreign affairs, who promised to consider it, but called attention to article XI of the Mexican constitution, which provides that every man has a right to enter and leave Mexico freely. 656
399 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Ryan Nov. 19 Same subject: No. 471 received. Article XI of the Mexican constitution does not appear to dispense with matriculation, nor to affect the sovereign attributes in dealing with questions of public security. 656
487 Mr. Ryan to Mr. Blaine Nov. 26 Chinese immigration from Mexico into the United States: The minister of foreign affairs can not see any way of preventing Chinese laborers from leaving Mexico in any direction that they may wish which would not conflict with article XI of the Mexican constitution. He will, however, consider any plan that may be submitted to him. 657

persia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
456 Mr. Pratt to Mr. Blaine 1890. May 24 Wounding of Mrs. J. N. Wright, the wife of an American missionary in Salmas, western Persia, by an Armenian. Incloses a copy of a telegram of the 23d instant from the British consul-general at Tabreez, saying that Mrs. Wright had been dangerously wounded and that the assassin, an Armenian, had escaped; and a copy of his own note of the 23d instant to the prime minister asking that steps be taken for the arrest of the assassin. 658
457 Same to same May 26 Same subject: The assassin has been arrested and is now in prison at Salmas. Mrs. Wright is now believed to be out of danger. Incloses copies of correspondence. 660
458 Same to same May 27 Same subject: The British consul-general at Tabreez will represent Mr. Pratt in the prosecution of the assassin. 661
459 Same to same June 3 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence relating all the circumstances in the case. 661
460 Same to same June 4 Same subject: Mrs. Wright died on the 1st instant. Relates steps taken for trying the murderer 666
461 Same to same June 12 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence with the British consul-general at Tabreez on the subject. 666
[Page LXXIV]462 Mr. Pratt to Mr. Blaine June 14 Same subject: Incloses a copy of his note of this date to the British consul-general at Tabreez, relative to the trial of the murderer. 668
463 Same to same June 18 Same subject: Incloses copies of further correspondence with the British consul-general at Tabreez. 669
464 Same to same June 25 Same subject: Incloses copies of further correspondence. 670
469 Same to same June 30 Same subject: Incloses copies of further correspondence. 672
472 Same to same July 5 Same subject: Incloses copies of further correspondence. 673
474 Same to same July 15 Same subject: Incloses a copy of a note of the 5th instant from the British consul-general at Tabreez, covering a copy of the proceedings in the trial of Minas, Mrs. Wright’s murderer. 675
226 Mr. Adee to Mr. Pratt July 15 Same subject: Nos. 459 and 460 received. The services rendered by the British minister at Teheran and the British consul-general at Tabreez, will form the subject of an instruction to the American minister at London. 683
227 Mr. Moore to Mr. Pratt July 23 Same subject: Nos.461 and 462 received. Approves his action. 684
479 Mr. Pratt to Mr. Blaine July 26 Same subject: The Shah has been led to believe that the evidence against Minas is not sufficient to warrant his execution, and has ordered that he be imprisoned for life instead. Has remonstrated to the prime minister. 684
482 Same to same Aug. 8 Same subject: Incloses copies of farther correspondence. 685
483 Same to same Aug. 9 Same subject: Incloses copies of further correspondence. 688
229 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pratt Aug. 25 Same subject: No. 474 received. Department appreciates the services rendered by the British consul-general at Tabreez. 690
487 Mr. Pratt to Mr. Blaine Aug. 26 Same subject: Orders have been given for the transfer of Minas from Tabreez to Teheran for safe-keeping. 690
490 Same to same Sept. 18 Same subject: Minas has been placed in prison at Teheran. 691
233 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Pratt. Sept. 19 Same subject: Nos. 479 and 482 received. The Department considers the evidence against Minas of the most indubitable character, and believes that the result of a mere sentence of imprisonment in the case would be additional crimes against Americans and Europeans in that district, but is confident that, on a fall consideration of the case, the Persian Government will deal wisely and courageously with the criminal. Incloses a copy of a letter of the 16th instant from the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, asking that the ends of justice be not defeated, as the lives of the remaining missionaries would be jeopardized thereby. 691

peru.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
70 Mr. Hicks to Mr. Blaine 1890. Jan. 14 Protection of William Gylling, a Swedish subject residing in Peru, who, in 1881, declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, but never took the subsequent steps necessary to the acquisition of citizenship; incloses a copy of a protection certificate which he proposes to issue to Gylling, and requests the Department’s instructions in the case. 693
38 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hicks Feb. 26 Same subject: No. 70 received; the declaration of intention has not the effect either of naturalization or of expatriation. Article I of the naturalization treaty of 1869 between the United States and Sweden and Norway provides that “the declaration of an intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not, for either party, the effect of citizenship legally acquired.” Is therefore of the opinion that the certificate should not be issued to Mr. Gylling. 694
[Page LXXV]104 Mr. Hicks to Mr. Blaine Mar. 24 Protection to William Gylling: No. 38 received. Thinks that it would be good policy to extend some sort of protection to this class of people. They feel that the oath by which they renounced all allegiance to their native land forever cuts them off from any relief from that source, and thus they are expatriated from both the old and the new. 694
51 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hicks. May 8 Same subject: No. 104 received. The declaration of intention is not a renunciation of the declarant’s original allegiance, but merely the expression of a purpose to renounce it. The actual renunciation is not effected until the applicant is admitted to citizenship. A government can not be held bound to protect persons who are not only not its citizens, but who have not exhibited a willingness to live long enough within its jurisdiction to acquire its citizenship. Gylling made his declaration of intention in 1881, and appears to have left the United States not long afterwards. By remaining abroad he continuously disables himself from fulfilling the conditions necessary to the acquisition of citizenship. Department is at a loss to understand why persons in a similar position “naturally look to the American legation for a recognition of their citizenship.” 695

russia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
12 Mr. Smith to Mr. Blaine 1890. June 17 Prison congress at St. Petersburg: Formally opened on the 15th instant; gives an account of the proceedings. 697
17 Same to same July 3 Same subject: The congress closed its regular work on the 24th ultimo; gives an abstract of the questions discussed; the next congress is to be held at Paris; incloses translations of the declaration of the congress on the subject of extradition and of the statistics of the congress. 698
44 Same to same Sept. 25 Expulsion of Jews from Russia: States facts tending to show that there is no foundation for the rumors on the subject. 701

sweden and norway.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
38 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Thomas 1890. May 15 Samoa: Article III of the general act of the Samoan conference at Berlin, June 14, 1889, provides for the establishment of a supreme court for the Samoan Islands, and the appointment of a chief justice of Samoa. Section 2 of article III states that “he shall be named by the three signatory powers in common accord; or, failing their agreement, he may be named by the King of Sweden and Norway.” Since there appears to be no possibility of agreement, the three Governments concerned have decided to avail themselves of the alternative. Instructs him to request the King’s acceptance of the choice made by the signatory powers, and to intimate to the minister of foreign affairs that the President would be pleased with the appointment of a subject of the King. Incloses a copy of Senate Miscellaneous Document No. 81, Fifty-first Congress, first session, containing the general act of the Samoan conference. 703
60 Same to same June 2 Samoa: Incloses a copy of an identical note of this date, drawn up after a conference with the British minister and the German chargé, and sent by each of them this day to the minister, of foreign affairs, asking that the King name a chief justice of Samoa. 703
[Page LXXVI]66 Mr. Thomas to Mr. Blaine July 7 Samoa: The King proposes to appoint as chief justice of Samoa Otto Conrad Valdemar Cedercrantz, a Swedish subject, and associate justice of the Swedish court of appeals. Gives a sketch of the life and character of Judge Cedercrantz. Recommends the acquiescence of the United States in his appointment. 705
49 Mr. Wharton to Mr. Thomas Aug. 5 Transportation of the remains of the late Capt. John Ericsson to Sweden: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 2d instant from the Navy Department, stating that the remains will be embarked on the United States steamer Baltimore, at New York, on the 23d instant, and a copy of a letter of the 2d instant from the Navy Department to Rear-Admiral Braine, giving instructions as to the ceremonies to be observed on the occasion. 706
50 Same to same Aug. 26 Transportation of the remains of Capt. John Ericsson to Sweden: Incloses a copy of the order issued by the Navy Department on the 18th instant, with regard to the ceremonies. The Baltimore sailed with the remains on the 23d instant. 707
74 Mr. Thomas to Mr. Blaine Sept. 15 Same subject: Describes the ceremonies accompanying the delivery of the remains of Ericsson to the Swedish Government on the 14th instant. 708
75 Same to same Sept. 22 Same subject: Has forwarded to the Department a box containing medals designed to commemorate the transportation of the remains of John Ericsson from the United States to Sweden, presented by the King to the officers and crew of the Baltimore. 711
76 Same to same Sept. 26 Same subject: The Baltimore sailed on the 23d instant. Recounts the attentions shown to her officers while she was at Stockholm. 711
80 Same to same Oct. 23 Samoa: Incloses a copy of a note of the 3d instant from the minister of foreign affairs, announcing that the King has appointed Otto Conrad valdemar Cedercrantz chief justice of Samoa; and a translation of Judge Cedercrantz’s commission. 713
82 Same to same Oct. 27 Transportation of the remains of John Ericsson to Sweden: Transmits copies of correspondence with the Swedish Inventors’ Society on the subject. 714
83 Same to same Oct. 29 Same subject: Incloses copies of correspondence with the minister of foreign affairs on the subject. 716

correspondence with the legation of sweden and norway at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Grip 1890. Aug. 5 Transportation of the remains of John Ericsson to Sweden: Incloses a letter of the 2d instant from the Navy Department, inviting the legation and the consular officers of Sweden and Norway to be present at the ceremonies attending the embarkation of the remains at New York on the 23d instant. 718
Mr. Grip to Mr. Wharton Aug. 9 Same subject: Incloses his acceptance of the invitation to attend the ceremonies at New York on the 23d instant. 719
Mr. Wharton to Mr. Grip Aug. 21 Same subject: Incloses a copy of the order issued by the Navy Department on the 18th instant, in reference to the salute to the flag of Sweden to be fired on the occasion of the embarkation of the remains. 720
Mr. Grip to Mr. Wharton Aug. 26 Same subject: Thanks for the honors paid to the Swedish flag at the embarkation of the remains of John Ericsson at New York on the 23d instant. 720
[Page LXXVII]

turkey.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
39 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch 1889. Dec. 7 Murderous attack upon two American missionaries, Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds, in Asiatic Turkey, in 1883, by Moussa Bey: Incloses a copy of a letter of the 2d instant, and inclosure from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, asking that diplomatic steps be taken to insure the punishment of Moussa Bey. 721
59 Mr. King to Mr. Blaine Dec. 10 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: Incloses a copy of his note of the 7th instant to the minister of public instruction, proposing a method of preventing such seizures. 722
62 Same to same Dec. 19

Trial of Moussa Bey for murder and robbery of an Armenian named Malkhas in Asiatic Turkey in 1886: Incloses a copy of the proceedings in the trial just ended at Constantinople, resulting in the acquittal of Moussa Bey.

Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: Incloses copies of further correspondence with the Porte on the subject.

724
64 Same to same Dec. 21 American mission schools in Turkey: Their present condition satisfactory, all things considered; gives details. 738
70 Same to same Dec. 28 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 39 received; has hopes that Moussa Bey will not go unpunished. 739
47 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch 1890. Jan. 3 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: No. 59 received. Approves Mr. King’s note of December 7, 1889, to the Porte. 739
50 Same to same Jan. 13 Murderous attack on Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 62 received. Approves Mr. King’s note of December 18, 1889, to Said Pasha on the subject. 740
82 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine Feb. 6 Same subject: Relates the substance of his interview of the 5th instant with the Grand Vizier, in which he urged the necessity of bringing Moussa Bey to justice. The Grand Vizier promised to call the immediate attention of the minister of justice to the matter. 740
85 Same to same Feb. 15 Military service of cavasses and dragomans employed by foreign legations and consulates: Incloses a copy of a “note verbale” of the 13th instant from the Porte, stating that only those cavasses and dragomans who may enter the service of the consulates hereafter will be called into military service, those now in the service being exempted. 742
88 Same to same Feb. 22 Murderous attack on Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: Incloses a translation of a memorandum read by the Sultan’s private secretary to the interpreter of the legation, stating that the Sultan regretted to hear that doubts have been expressed by some officials of the United States legation as to the legality and the justice of the verdict issued in the trial of the matter of Moussa Bey; has asked for an interview with the Sultan on the subject, but it has not yet been granted. 742
61 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch Mar. 1 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 82 received. Approves the remarks made by Mr. Hirsch at his interview of the 5th ultimo with the Grand Vizier. 744
66 Same to same Mar. 19 Same subject: No.88 received. The Sultan appears to have been led to the mistaken belief that the United States Government is demanding a reconsideration of the verdict of acquittal in the recent trial of Moussa Bey for alleged outrages against Armenians. 745
99 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine Mar. 19 Maltreatment of two American citizens, Moses Angel and Shalom Kanstoroom by Turkish soldiers at Jerusalem: Incloses copies of correspondence and documents on the subject. Has called on the consul general for a further report. The Grand Vizier has promised an immediate investigation. 745
[Page LXXVIII]104 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine Mar. 31 Seizures of hooks offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: Incloses a copy of a memorandum on the subject by Rev. Henry O. Dwight. Has made repeated remonstrances to the Grand Vizier on the subject. 752
76 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch Apr. 9 Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kanstoroom by Turkish soldiers at Jerusalem: No. 99 received. Reviews the facts in the case; instructs him to await full ascertainment of the facts before taking definite action; very positive evidence to offset the facts thus far known will be needed to exempt the Turkish authorities from a just demand for reparation. 757
113 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine. Apr. 18 Murderous attack on Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: Incloses a copy of a note of the 7th instant from the Porte stating facts intended to show that Moussa Bey was not guilty, but adding that the parties interested are at liberty to prosecute Moussa Bey if they obtain new evidence against him; points out the misstatements in the said note; has protested against the findings of the department of justice, and stated to the Grand Vizier and the minister of foreign affairs that the United States Government looks to the Ottoman Government to make good its promises that Moussa Bey should be punished, and demanded that Moussa Bey be detained at Constantinople until Mr. Hirsch could communicate with the Government at Washington. 758
80 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch Apr. 19 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: No. 104 received. Approves his representations to the Porte. Will, rely upon his strenuous efforts to secure the complete protection of this legitimate American interest. 760
118 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine Apr. 25 Robbery of two American missionaries, Rev. Mr. McDowell and Rev. Dr. Wishard, in Asiatic Turkey, by Nestorian mountaineers, in 1889: Incloses a copy of his note of the 24th instant to the Porte, asking for the arrest and punishment of the robbers. 760
123 Same to same May 3 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by moussa Bey in 1883: Incloses a copy of his note of the 1st instant to the Porte, pointing out the misstatements in the Porte’s note of April 7, and claiming the promise of the Turkish Government that Moussa Bey should be/brought to justice. 761
82 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch May 6 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: Incloses copies of recent correspondence with the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions on the subject. 763
85 Same to same May 8 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 113 received. Criticizes the course pursued by the Turkish Government in the matter. 764
87 Same to same May 13 Robbery of Rev. Mr. McDowell and Rev. Dr. Wishard by Nestorian mountaineers in 1889: No. 118 received. A speedy disposition of the case is desirable. 765
90 Same to same May 20 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883; No. 123 received. Approves his note of the 1st instant to the Porte. 765
131 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine May 30 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: Incloses a copy of his note of this date to the Porte, asking for payment for certain books seized and burned by the Turkish authorities in Mesopotamia. 765
134 Same to same June 4 Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kanstoroom by Turkish soldiers at Jerusalem: Has made arrangements with the Grand Vizier for a joint investigation of the matter by the United States consul at Jerusalem and the governor of Jerusalem. Incloses copies of correspondence. 766
[Page LXXIX]141 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Elaine June 19 Riot at Jaffa, May 23, 1890: Incloses a copy of a dispatch of the 26th ultimo from the United States consul at Jerusalem, stating that on the 23d of May the Christians at Jaffa were attacked by a Moslem mob carrying banners and armed with sticks. 768
143 Same to same June 19 Robert College: An iradé has been granted for an addition to the college building. 769
98 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch June 20 Seizures of books offered for sale in Turkey by American missionaries: No. 131 received. Requests information on certain points. 770
100 Same to same June 25 Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kanstoroom: No. 134 received. Approves his action. 770
146 Mr. MacNutt to Mr. Blaine. July 3 Riots at Erzerum: Gives details with regard to recent conflicts between the Christians and Moslems at Erzerum. 770
112 Mr. Wharton to Mr. MacNutt. July 25 Maltreatment of Moses Angel and Shalom Kanstoroom: Incloses a copy of No. 173 of the 23d ultimo from the United States consul at Jerusalem, stating that the Government had made the most ample apology, casting all the blame upon the stupidity and ignorance of the official and soldiers. 771
151 Mr. MacNutt to Mr. Blaine. Aug. 14 St. Paul’s Institute at Tarsus: An Iradé has been promised for the foundation of the institute. 772
171 Mr. Hirsch to Mr. Blaine Oct. 22 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: Moussa Bey has been banished to Medina. 773
177 Same to same Nov. 4 Schools conducted by American missionaries at Mejdel Shems, Ain Kunyet Banias, and Hamath, closed by the Turkish authorities in 1884, have been permitted to be reopened. Incloses copies of correspondence on the subject. 773
132 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Hirsch Nov. 17 Murderous attack upon Rev. Mr. Knapp and Rev. Dr. Raynolds by Moussa Bey in 1883: No. 171 received. Is glad to hear of the action finally taken by the Turkish Government in the case of Moussa Bey. 775

venezuela.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
63 Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine 1889. Dec. 21 Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana: Incloses a copy of a note of the 20th instant from the foreign office, covering a copy of a protest of the Venezuelan Government against the recent action of the governor of Demerara in declaring the town of Barima a British colonial port. 776
82 Same to same 1890. Mar. 6 Political: Congress met on the 20th ultimo. Transmits copies of the President’s message of the 1st instant: gives a synopsis of the same. 777
98 Same to same Apr. 25 Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana: Gives a sketch of the successive encroachments of Great Britain on the territory of Venezuela. 778
81 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs May 2 Same subject: Incloses a copy of Departments telegram of the 1st instant, instructing the United States minister in London to use his good offices to bring about the resumption of diplomatic relations between Great Britain and Venezuela. 779
100 Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine May 3 Same subject: Incloses a sketch map of the territory in dispute. 779
85 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs May 19 Same subject: Incloses a copy of No. 229 from the United States minister in London on the subject. 780
88 Same to same May 21 Same subject: No. 100, with the inclosed map, received. 780
106 Mr. Scruggs to Mr. Blaine June 7 Same subject: Gives an abstract of the report of the special commissioner of the Venezuelan Government to that of British Guiana; he reports the occupation of the disputed territory by the Demerara authorities as a “fact formally and fully accomplished.” 780
97 Mr. Blaine to Mr. Scruggs. June 21 Same subject: No. 106 received 781
[Page LXXX]

correspondence with the legation of venezuela at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine 1890. Feb. 17 Boundary between Venezuela and British Guiana: Points out the dangers threatening all the American states through Great Britain’s forcible seizure of Barima and the control which she has thereby gained of the navigation of the Orinoco. Requests the good offices of the United States to secure a peaceful settlement of the question. 782
Same to same Apr. 24 Same subject: Urges the importance of sending instructions to the United States minister in London to use his good offices in the matter, that the questions involved may be submitted to arbitration. 784
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Peraza May 2 Same subject: Cabled the United States minister in London on the 1st instant to use his good offices with the British Government to bring about a resumption of diplomatic relations between Venezuela and Great Britain as a preliminary step towards negotiations for the arbitration of the dispute. 784
Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine May 5 Same subject: Expresses his gratification at the instructions sent to the United States minister in London; conveys the thanks of the President of Venezuela. 785
Mr. Blaine to Mr. Peraza May 19 Same subject: Lord Salisbury hag informed the United States minister in London that he wished to consult with the colonial office before replying to his suggestions. 786
Mr. Peraza to Mr. Blaine May 20 Same subject: Transmits two maps showing the successive encroachments of Great Britain on the territory of Venezuela. 786
Mr. Adee to Mr. Peraza July 9 Same subject: The United States minister in London presented Señor Pulido, the special envoy from Venezuela to Great Britain, to Lord Salisbury on the 25th ultimo. 788