No. 61.

Mr. Hall to Mr. Bayard .

[Extract.]
No. 327.]

Sir: With reference to my dispatch No. 322 of the 14th instant, I have the honor to inclose copies * * * and translations of the telegrams, which have passed between the President of Nicaragua, the minister for foreign affairs of Honduras and others, and myself, since the 19th instant. These show what has been done and the efforts that have been made in attempting to carry out the views expressed in your telegram of the 11th instant, to wit, “that the United States stand ready to exert their influence to avert a conflict and promote peace.”

These steps, which have been taken without my special instruction, other than the foregoing, I trust will meet your approval. Aside from the ground of humanity, our citizens have large interests in these countries, in Guatemala especially; these interests are threatened with serious injury, if not with ruin, in the event of war, which now seems imminent. I confess, however, that while the efforts which have been made may tend to postpone the conflict, I have little hope that it will be averted and peace promoted.

In my dispatch above mentioned I referred to an interview with President Barrios, at which he gave assurances that he would not invade Salvador, and that Honduras would observe the same conduct in regard to Nicaragua.

On the 19th instant I informed President Cardenas that I was making efforts, through my Government, in favor of peace; that President Barrios had promised that neither Gautemala nor Honduras would invade Salvador or Nicaragua, if the two latter should observe the same conduct towards the other states. He replied, on the 23d, that Nicaragua had abstained from invading Honduras and that Salvador would remain solely on the defensive He adds, however, that he knows positively that Bogran is advancing to invade Salvador. I transcribed [Page 92] these telegrams to the minister of foreign affairs of Honduras, who in reply, dated yesterday, gives assurances that there is no such intention on the part of General Bogran. He declares also that Salvador and Nicaragua were the first to send their forces to the frontiers; notwithstanding, Honduras will take no imprudent step. In a second dispatch he transcribes a telegram from General Bogran confirming these assurances.

Copies of other communications between Presidents Bogran and Barrios, and from the latter to his minister, Señor Cruz, are appended to the inclosure. From these it is to be inferred that should hostilities take place the responsibility will fall on Salvador; that Zaldivar has sent an Indian outlaw named Baraona with a force of 400 Salvadorians into Honduras with the view of promoting a revolution among those of his class, and that he (Zaldivar) had also sent a band of 200 criminals into Guatemala to maraud and plunder.

The two telegrams of yesterday from Minister Zelaya, of Honduras, were transmitted at once to President Cardenas, and their receipt has been acknowledged to day.

As I have informed you in my dispatch No. 322, and in my telegram of the 18th instant, Barrios, since he has realized that he will not be supported by Zaldivar, has manifested a willingness, and even a desire, to withdraw from his present position.

* * * * * * *

In the mean time the Mexican minister and suite have gone to Salvador, and the legation is closed, but the family of the minister remain here. The British and German ministers have informed me that they have applied to their respective Governments for naval vessels, to be stationed on the Pacific coast of these states.

I have, &c.,

HENRY C. HALL.
[Inclosure in No. 327.—Telegrams.]

Mr. Hall to President Cardenas .

President Cardenas, Managua:

Ever since my return from Nicaragua I have been making efforts, through my Government, to avert a conflict. President Barrios offers me that until my Government is heard from neither Guatemala nor Honduras shall invade Salvador or Nicaragua, if on the part of the two latter the same conduct shall be observed respecting Guatemala and Honduras.

I hope you will concur with me that this proposal is reasonable and convenient, in which case Nicaragua will undertake no invasion of Honduras. Please answer.

HALL.

President Cardenas to Mr. Hall .

[Translation.]

Minister Hall, Guatemala:

My Government, in deference to your suggestion, has abstained from invading Honduras, and influenced Salvador to maintain herself solely on the defensive; but to-day I know positively that General Bogran advances with forces to invade Salvador, and I inform you in order to save every responsibility for the consequences. Please acknowledge receipt.

“CARDENAS.
[Page 93]

Mr. Hall to Señor Zelaya .

[Translation.]

Minister Zelaya, Tegucigalpa:

I answer your telegram of to-day, informing you that under date of yesterday, President Cardenas, of Nicaragua, telegraphs me the following:

“My Government, in deference to your suggestion, has abstained from invading Honduras, and influenced Salvador to maintain herself solely on the defensive; but to-day I know positively that General Bogran advances with forces to invade Salvador, and I inform you in order to save every responsibility for the consequences. Please acknowledge receipt.

“CARDENAS.”

I beg that you will give me the facts in regard to the invasion of Salvador by Honduranian forces; if true, my friendly influence to avoid a conflict and in favor of peace will avail nothing.

HENRY C. HALL.
[Translation.]

Señor Zelaya to Mr. Hall .

Minister Hall, Guatemala:

To-day I have received your telegram, for which I thank you. General Bogran has done nothing more than to move to Nacaome and Cholateca to take command of the army; but I assure you, and am answerable to you therefor, that he will not invade Salvador nor Nicaragua. The Governments of these states were the first to send forces to the frontier. Ours have not moved from Nacaome and Cholateca. You can use your friendly influence with the assurance that Hondurus will take no imprudent step, and will wait to be attacked.

JERONIMO ZELAYA.

Señor Zelaya to Mr. Hall .

[Translation.]

Minister Hall, Guatemala:

In confirmation of the telegram I addressed to you two hours ago, I transcribe to you the following just received from General Bogran:

Nacaome, March 25, 1885.

“Minister Zelaya:

“In consideration of the good offices of Mr. Hall, I shall restrict myself to guarding the frontier until the result of his mediation be known; but it will not be possible to maintain indefinitely an armed and expectant attitude, which paralyzes all operations and occasions heavy expenditures. Zaldivar has Baraona (an Indian chief of Honduras) in Pasaquina, threatening the tranquillity of these people. Taking into account the character of that chief, he cannot be trusted to respect Honduranian territory, even should he have orders to that effect, so that should any excision arise, which I shall not at present initiate, the blame and responsibility must be charged to Salvador.

“BOGRAN.”

I am, your obedient servant,

JERONIMO ZELAYA.

Note.—Under the same date, 25th instant, the last two telegrams from Señor Zelaya, minister for foreign affairs of Honduras, were transcribed to President Cardenas of Nicaragua.

[Page 94]

The following are translations of telegrams sent to Mr. Hall by Minister Cruz, of Guatemala:

President Bogran of Honduras to President Barrios.

I have just learned that Zaldivar (President of Salvador) has armed the Indian Baraona with the object of revolutionizing Honduras.

BOGRAN
.

Same to same.

I confirm my telegram of this morning. I leave for the frontier within an hour. My plan is purely defensive; but if I am invaded I shall invade.

BOGRAN
.

President Barrios to Minister Cruz.

In answer to your telegram I have to inform you that Bogran telegraphs me that Baraona with 400 Salvadorians has invaded Hondurian territory, this is the conduct the separatists observe, and according to a dispatch from the Commandant Chiquimula, just received, they may invade Guatemala. This invasion they expect to make with a force under Lieut. Col, José Palacios. Zaldivar, as you know, is not a man whose word affords any guarantee.

BARRIOS
.

Same to same.

Go personally to Minister Hall and tell him that in this place on the way to Jutiapa, I have received a dispatch from the commandant of Chiquimula, informing me that 200 armed Salvadorians have passed the line, and in consequence I have given orders that they be followed up not only in our territory but also, in Salvador as they are a band of criminals armed by the Salvadorian Government with the object of plunder.

BARRIOS
.

Mr. Hall to Señor Zelaya.

I have received your two telegrams of to-day and transcribed them at once to Doctor Cardenas, and will inform you the result. I thank you for the courtesy with which my suggestions have been received.

HENRY C. HALL
.

Señor Zelaya to Mr. Hall.

I thank you for your telegrams, and await news of the result of your friendly offices, which you offer to communicate to me.

JERONIMO ZELAYA
.

President Cardenas to Mr. Hall.

I thank you for your efforts to arrest conflict. Our forces on the frontier of Honduras have received no orders to invade.

CARDENAS.