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Contributors

Joshua Botts holds a Ph.D. in U.S. History from the University of Virginia and serves as Research Historian in the Special Projects Division of the Office of the Historian at the Department of State. His scholarly writings include a journal article on George Kennan and a dissertation that examined the evolution of neoconservative ideas about U.S. foreign policy during and after the Cold War. He is currently working on the Foreign Relations volume covering national security policy from 1981 to 1984.

Peter Cozzens is a former U.S. Army officer, career Foreign Service Officer, and author of multiple works on the Civil War and 19th century Indian wars. A summa cum laude graduate of Knox College, he received the American Foreign Service Association’s highest award for demonstrating moral courage, integrity, and creative dissent. His writings have won multiple prizes and earned Book of the Month Club, History Book Club, and Military Book Club selections.

Aaron W. Marrs holds a Ph.D. in U.S. History from the University of South Carolina and works in the Policy Studies Division of the Office of the Historian, Department of State. His scholarly publications include Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society (2009). He has received grants from the American Antiquarian Society and Library Company of Philadelphia in support of his current research on a social and cultural history of America’s antebellum transportation revolution.

William B. McAllister holds a Ph.D. in Modern European and Diplomatic History from the University of Virginia. In addition to serving as Special Projects Division Chief in the Office of the Historian, Department of State, he teaches as an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. McAllister has published widely on the history of international drug control, compiled FRUS volumes on global issues and United Nations affairs for the Nixon–Ford subseries, and served as Acting General Editor of the Foreign Relations series during 2009–2010.