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A Guide to the United States’ History of Recognition, Diplomatic, and Consular Relations, by Country, since 1776: Schaumburg-Lippe

Summary

When the United States announced its independence from Great Britain in 1776, Schaumburg-Lippe was a small independent country within the Holy Roman Empire. In 1807 the rulers of Schaumburg-Lippe joined the Confederation of the Rhine. In return, Schaumburg-Lippe was elevated to the status of principality. Retaining its independence and sovereignty after the Napoleonic Wars, the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe joined the German Confederation in 1815. The first official act of mutual recognition between Schaumburg-Lippe and the United States came in 1854.

Schaumburg-Lippe originally sided with Austria during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War but changed allegiances and joined Prussia. Schaumburg-Lippe subsequently joined the North German Confederation in 1867, and in 1871 Schaumburg-Lippe became part of the German Empire. From this point forward, foreign policy of the German Empire was made in Berlin, with the German Kaiser (who was also the King of Prussia) accrediting ambassadors of foreign nations. Relations with Imperial Germany were severed when the U.S. declared war in 1917.

Recognition

Mutual Recognition, 1854.

On June 7, 1854, Schaumburg-Lippe signed the Declaration of Accession to the Convention for the Extradition of Criminals, Fugitive from Justice, of June 16, 1852 between the United States and Prussia and Other States of the Germanic Confederation in Buckeburg. This agreement provided for the reciprocal extradition of fugitive criminals in special cases between Schaumburg-Lippe and the United States.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations.

The United States and the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe never established diplomatic relations.

Treaties and Agreements

Declaration of Accession to the Convention for the Extradition of Criminals, Fugitive from Justice, of June 16, 1852, between the United States and Prussia and other States of the German Confederation, 1854.

On June 7, 1854, the Government of the Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe declared its accession to the convention providing for reciprocal extradition of fugitive criminals in special cases between the United States, Prussia, and other states of the German Confederation.

Key Diplomatic Events

Schaumburg-Lippe Joins the North German Confederation, 1867.

Schaumburg-Lippe Joins the North German Confederation, 1867. Following the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe joined the North German Confederation in 1867 when it was created as a federal state.

Schaumburg-Lippe Joins the German Empire, 1871.

The Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe joined the German Empire, which was proclaimed on January 18, 1871.

German Unification.

The Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe was one of the states involved in the process of German unification during the mid-nineteenth century. See “Unification of German States” for greater detail.

Resources

  • William M. Malloy, Treaties, Conventions, International Acts, Protocols, and Agreements Between The United States of American and Other Powers, 1776-1909 (Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1910).
  • John Bassett Moore, A Digest of International Law (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1906).
  • John Bassett Moore, Four Phases of American Development (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1912).
  • James J. Sheehan, German History 1770-1866, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989).