Countries

A Guide to the United States' History of Recognition, Diplomatic, and Consular Relations, by Country, since 1776: Yemen

Summary

The area that comprises Yemen today has traditionally, since the nineteenth century, been divided in two along a north-south divide. What was once North Yemen was part of the former Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, while what used to be South Yemen fell under British influence starting in 1839 when the British captured the port of Aden. After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, North Yemen became an independent republic while South Yemen continued under the British until Britain withdrew in 1967. British authorities left southern Yemen in November 1967 in the wake of an intense terrorist campaign. The two countries were formally unified as the Republic of Yemen in 1990.Modern Flag of YemenModern Flag of Yemen

Recognition

U.S. Recognition of Yemen (Northern Yemen), 1946.

The United States recognized the Kingdom of the Yemen as a sovereign state on March 4, 1946, in a letter from President Harry Truman to the Imam Yahya, the King of the Yemen.

U.S. Recognition of Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen), 1962.

The United States was one of the first countries to recognize the Yemen Arab Republic, doing so on December 19, 1962.

U.S. Recognition of People's Republic of Southern Yemen, 1967.

Although the People’s Republic of Southern Yemen gained independence on November 30, 1967, the United States did not recognize it until December 7, when the U.S. consul general in Aden, William L. Eagleton, Jr. informed the new government authorities of the United States’ decision. In 1970, the name of the country was changed to the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations with the Kingdom of Yemen (North Yemen), 1946.

Diplomatic relations were established on March 4, 1946, when the United States and Yemen agreed to the appointment of an American Special Diplomatic Mission to the Kingdom of the Yemen. William A. Eddy was named Chief of this mission and concluded a provisional agreement on relations between the two states on May 4, 1946.

First U.S. Minister to Kingdom of Yemen (North Yemen), 1946.

On September 30, 1946, J. Rives Childs presented his credentials as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Kingdom of Yemen (North Yemen). Childs was also accredited to Saudi Arabia and was resident at Jidda.

Establishment of American Legation at Taiz (North Yemen), 1959.

The American Legation at Taiz was opened to the public as of March 16, 1959, with Charles B. Ferguson as Chargé d’Affaires ad interim.

Elevation of American Legation in Taiz (North Yemen) to Embassy Status, 1963.

The American Legation at Taiz was raised to Embassy status on January 28, 1963. However, from 1962 until 1967 there was no U.S. Minister or Ambassador accredited to the Kingdom of Yemen, which during this time changed its name to the Yemen Arab Republic. The American Embassy was run by the chargé d’affaires ad interim.

Movement of American Embassy from Taiz to San’a (North Yemen), 1966.

In 1966 the U.S. moved its embassy from Taiz, the old capital, to San’a, the new capital of the Yemen Arab Republic.

Diplomatic Relations Severed, 1967.

The Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen) severed relations with the United States on June 7, 1967 in the wake of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations with People’s Republic of Southern Yemen (South Yemen), 1967.

The United States established diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of Southern Yemen the same day that it recognized the Republic’s independence, on December 7, 1967, when it established the U.S. Embassy in Aden. William L. Eagleton, Jr., served as Chargé d'Affaires ad interim.

Establishment of American Embassy in Aden (South Yemen), 1967.

The U.S. Embassy in Aden was established on December 7, 1967, with William L. Eagleton, Jr., as Chargé d'Affaires ad interim.

Severance of Diplomatic Relations, 1969.

Chargé d’Affaires ad interim William L. Eagleton, Jr. was in charge of the American Embassy in Aden when the People’s Republic of Southern Yemen severed diplomatic relations with the United States on October 24, 1969.

Closure of Embassy Aden (South Yemen), 1969.

Edward E. Keller, Jr., was Chargé d'Affaires ad interim when the Embassy was closed on Oct 26, 1969.

Diplomatic Relations Resumed and Reopening of American Embassy San’a, 1972.

The United States reestablished diplomatic relations with the Yemen Arab Republic after a visit to San’a by U.S. Secretary of State William P. Rogers in July 1972. At this time, the Embassy in San’a reopened. Robert A. Stein served as Chargé d’Affaires ad interim. U.S. Ambassador William R. Crawford, Jr. presented his credentials on December 19, 1972, and was the first U.S. Ambassador resident in Yemen.

Resumption of Diplomatic Relations with the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen (South Yemen), 1990.

The United States resumed diplomatic relations with the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen on Apr 30, 1990.

Unification of the Yemen Arab Republic and the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, 1990.

On May 22, 1990, the Yemen Arab Republic and the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen announced that they would form a united "Republic of Yemen." The U.S. Embassy in Aden never reopened.

Resources

  • Department of State Country Fact Sheet: Yemen
  • Department of State Country Information: Yemen