Countries

A Guide to the United States' History of Recognition, Diplomatic, and Consular Relations, by Country, since 1776: Denmark

Summary

Denmark and the United States have never experienced an interruption in their diplomatic relations since they were first established in 1801. In 1917, Denmark sold the Danish West Indies in the Caribbean Sea to the United States; the islands are now known as the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Since its liberation in 1945, Denmark has been one of the United States’ closest allies. A founding-member of both the United Nations and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, in recent years Denmark has also been an energetic supporter of U.S. policy in Iraq and Afghanistan, and hosts the vital early-warning radar facility in Thule, Greenland. U.S.-Danish relations are also strengthened by the fact that the United States is currently Denmark’s largest non-European trading partner.

Modern Flag of Denmark

Modern Flag of Denmark

Recognition

Danish Recognition of the United States, 1792.

Denmark recognized the United States when the U.S. consul at Copenhagen, Hans Saabye, received an exequatar from the Danish government on or about June 9, 1792.

Consular Presence

Establishment of Consular Relations, 1792.

Consular relations were established on or about June 9, 1792, when the U.S. consul at Copenhagen, Hans Saabye, received an exequatar from the Danish government.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations, 1801.

Diplomatic relations were established on October 12, 1801, when the Danish Minister Resident to the United States presented his credentials to the U.S. government.

Legation Established at Copenhagen, 1827.

The U.S. Legation at Copenhagen was established on September 20, 1827, when Chargé d'Affaires Henry Wheaton presented his credentials to the Danish government.

Legation Closed, 1941.

The U.S. Legation at Copenhagen was closed on December 20, 1941, following the outbreak of war between the United States and Germany. German forces had occupied the city on April 9, 1940 and U.S. Minister Ray Atherton left Copenhagen on June 5, 1940. Atherton subsequently took up residence in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada as U.S. Minister to Denmark’s government, which remained in Danish hands until German authorities seized complete control in August 1943.

Legation at Copenhagen Reopened, 1945.

On June 16, 1945, the U.S. Legation at Copenhagen was reopened following Denmark’s liberation from German occupation during World War II.

Legation Raised to Embassy, 1947.

The Legation at Copenhagen was raised to an Embassy on March 18, 1947, when Ambassador Josiah Marvel, Jr. presented his of credentials to the Danish government.

Resources

  • Department of State Country Fact Sheet: Denmark
  • Department of State Country Information: Denmark

Resources

  • Denmark in World Wide Diplomatic Archives Index