Countries

A Guide to the United States' History of Recognition, Diplomatic, and Consular Relations, by Country, since 1776: Brazil

Summary

The United States and Brazil have enjoyed long and friendly relations, dating from its years as a Portuguese colony. U.S. merchant ships frequented Brazilian ports such as Pernambuco (now Recife), Bahia (now Salvador), and Rio de Janeiro, and U.S. Consulates appeared in the ports of Pernambuco and Rio de Janeiro in the 1810s. Since Brazil’s independence the United States and Brazil have had good relations, and at the beginning of the twentieth century the U.S.-Brazilian relationship was sometimes characterized as "the unwritten alliance." During World War II Brazil sent the Brazilian Expeditionary Force to assist the U.S.-led Italian Campaign. Since World War II, as Brazil has emerged as a regional power and an important leader in international affairs, the United States and Brazil have enjoyed friendly, strong, and active relations, encompassing a broad political and economic agenda.

Modern Flag of Brazil

Modern Flag of Brazil

Recognition

U.S. Recognition of Brazilian Independence, 1824.

The United States recognized the Kingdom of Brazil on May 26, 1824, when President James Monroe received José Silvestre Rebello, as Brazil’s Chargé d’Affaires to the United States.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations, 1824.

The United States established relations with the Kingdom of Brazil on May 26, 1824, when President James Monroe received José Silvestre Rebello, as Brazil’s Chargé d’Affaires to the United States. On March 9, 1825, President Monroe appointed Condy Raguet of Pennsylvania as Chargé d’Affaires to Brazil.

Establishment of the U.S. Legation in Brazil, 1825.

The U. S. Legation in Brazil was established in Rio de Janeiro when U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Condy Raguet of Pennsylvania presented his credentials to Emperor Pedro I on October 29, 1825.

Elevation of American Legation to Embassy Status, 1905.

The United States elevated the U.S. Embassy in Rio de Janeiro on January 13, 1905, when U.S. Minister to Brazil, David E. Thompson of Nebraska was appointed U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary.

Resources

  • Department of State Country Fact Sheet: Brazil
  • Department of State Country Information: Brazil
  • Library of Congress Country Study: Brazil

Resources

  • Brazil in World Wide Diplomatic Archives Index