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Foreign Relations of the United States, 1961–1963, Volume IV, Vietnam, August–December 1963

Editor:
  • Edward C. Keefer
General Editor:
  • John P. Glennon
United States Government Printing Office
Washington
1991
[Page I]
Foreign Relations of the United States
1961–1963
Vietnam, August–December 1963
Department of State
Washington
United States Government Printing Office Washington 1991 [Page II]Department of State Publication 9857
Office of the Historian
Bureau of Public Affairs
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents Washington, DC 20402-9398
[Page III]

Preface

The publication Foreign Relations of the United States constitutes the official record of the foreign policy of the United States. The volumes in the series include, subject to necessary security considerations, all documents needed to give a comprehensive record of the major foreign policy decisions of the United States together with appropriate materials concerning the facts that contributed to the formulation of policies. Documents in the files of the Department of State are supplemented by papers from other government agencies involved in the formulation of foreign policy. This volume also includes documents from the private collections of various government officials connected with U.S. policy toward Vietnam.

The basic documentary diplomatic record printed in the volumes of the series is edited by the Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs, Department of State. The editing is guided by the principles of historical objectivity and in accordance with the following official guidance first promulgated by Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg on March 26, 1925:

There may be no alteration of the text, no deletions without indicating the place in the text where the deletion is made, and no omission of facts which were of major importance in reaching a decision. Nothing may be omitted for the purpose of concealing or glossing over what might be regarded by some as a defect of policy. However, certain omissions of documents are permissible for the following reasons:

a.
To avoid publication of matters that would tend to impede current diplomatic negotiations or other business.
b.
To condense the record and avoid repetition of needless details.
c.
To preserve the confidence reposed in the Department by individuals and by foreign governments.
d.
To avoid giving needless offense to other nationalities or individuals.
e.
To eliminate personal opinions presented in despatches and not acted upon by the Department. To this consideration there is one qualification: in connection with major decisions it is desirable, where possible, to show the alternative presented to the Department before the decision was made.

[Page IV]

Principles of Selection for Foreign Relations, 1961-1963, Volume IV

Document selection for this volume proceeded on the basis of a research plan developed by the editors after a preliminary review of repositories in both governmental and private agencies. From the outset the editors approached their research realizing the need to supplement the written record of U.S. policy during the Vietnam war with interviews of officials who participated in the policy process. Early attention was also given to those oral history interviews of participants already in existence and available in various locations. Oral history citations are provided in the footnotes to the text.

On the basis of their preliminary research and review of already-published documentation, including the 1971 “Pentagon Papers,” the editors developed the following five areas of focus for the research and selection of documents for inclusion in this volume: 1) Discussion and formulation of policy in Washington; 2) Policy implementation in South Vietnam; 3) The relationship among the United States Government, the Diem government, and dissident elements in South Vietnam; 4) U.S. intelligence assessments of the viability of the Diem government and the prospects of potential coup plotters; and 5) U.S. military involvement in Vietnam.

Discussion and formulation of policy in Washington: President John F. Kennedy and, after his assassination on November 22, 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson, made the important policy decisions on Vietnam. They received advice from the Washington foreign affairs community, either orally at meetings or in documents. The records of these meetings with the Presidents and advice provided to them in writing are the focus of this volume. The editors are confident that they have had complete access to all the Presidential written records bearing on Vietnam.

The most important repositories for records on the formulation of U.S. policy toward Vietnam are the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Libraries. The records of the Department of State, to which the editors had complete access, include a large segment of Presidential and National Security Council documentation, but the Kennedy and Johnson Libraries remain the single most comprehensive sources. The papers of the President's Military Representative, General Maxwell D. Taylor, at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C., are also of unusual importance. The documents in the Taylor Papers provide a unique record of Taylor's advice to the President on Vietnam and records of some meetings both at the White House and at the Department of Defense for which there are no other accounts. Department of Defense records, especially files and papers of Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, located at the Washington National Records Center, are an important subsidiary source. A private [Page V]collection, the W. Averell Harriman Papers, are also of considerable interest. Used with the permission of the late Ambassador Harriman when they were still in his possession, they are now housed at the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division. The Roger Hilsman papers, located at the Kennedy Library, also proved an important source of documents not found in official files.

Policy implementation in Vietnam: The editors also selected documentation that covered the implementation of Presidentially-established policy and a small range of lesser policy decisions that did not reach the White House or were resolved in the Department of State or other agencies of the foreign affairs community. The files of the Department of State, the Kennedy and Johnson Libraries, and the United States Information Agency are the primary documentary sources for these decisions.

The relationship among the United States Government, the Diem government, and dissident elements in South Vietnam: From late August 1963, when this volume begins, to the overthrow of the Diem government on November 1, 1963, the United States strongly supported the Republic of Vietnam, but the relationship was strained. The extensive reports of U.S. Embassy relations with the Diem government come primarily from the central files of the Department of State.

The fact that the United States was in close contact with dissident elements in South Vietnam makes events in Saigon crucial to understanding U.S. policy. The editors have, therefore, included a considerable number of telegraphic reports from the Embassy and the Central Intelligence Agency Station in Saigon on relations with dissident Vietnamese. Central Intelligence Agency records were obtained from the Kennedy Library, Department of State files, the Taylor Papers, Department of Defense records, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff files. The CIA provided full access to the Department historians to Agency documents in the Presidential libraries, and many of these documents are printed here. Some access was eventually provided to documentation retained by the Agency itself, but too late for documents to be included in this volume. Significant declassified material obtained from the CIA archives for 1963 will be printed in a subsequent volume in the Foreign Relations series.

U.S. intelligence estimates of the viability of the Diem government and the potential prospects of coup plotters: The ability of the U.S. Government to estimate the viability of the Diem government and the prospects for potential coup plotters are of central importance during a period in which there was extensive planning for a coup and then a successful overthrow of President Diem. This volume and its companion, documenting the first part of 1963 (volume III), include communications between the Central Intelligence Agency and its Station in [Page VI]Saigon. In addition to these telegrams, a representative selection of finished intelligence assessments prepared by the U.S. intelligence community is printed.

U.S. military involvement in Vietnam: The editors sought to include documentation that illustrated the relationship between military planning and strategy and the conduct of relations with the Republic of Vietnam and other countries. No attempt was made to document operational details of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. The Taylor Papers, the files of the Secretary of Defense and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs at the Washington National Records Center, and the decentralized files of the Department of State's Vietnam Working Group are the principal sources for this topic.

The question of press coverage of developments in Vietnam and U.S. involvement became less sensitive during the latter part of 1963, but still remained an important issue. Documentation relating to public affairs and press relations is located in the files of the United States Information Agency.

The editors of the volume are confident that the documents printed here provide a comprehensive and accurate foreign affairs record of United States policy toward and involvement in Vietnam during the last four months of 1963. The declassification review process for the documents selected for this volume, outlined in more detail below, resulted in withholding from publication only 1.7 percent of the original manuscript.

The editors wish to acknowledge the assistance of officials at the National Archives and Records Administration's John F. Kennedy Library and Lyndon B. Johnson Libraries, in particular Suzanne Forbes and David Humphry. Susan Lemke at the National Defense University and Sandra Meagher at the Department of Defense deserve special thanks, as do former government officials who consented to oral history interviews for this volume.

Editorial Methodology

The documents are presented chronologically according to Washington time. Incoming telegrams from U.S. missions are placed according to time of receipt in the Department of State or other receiving agency, rather than the time of transmission; memoranda of conversation are placed according to the time and date of the conversation, rather than the date the memorandum was drafted. The editors were not always able to determine the precise chronological order of documents produced during periods of crisis and intense activity, particularly during the November 1 coup. In these cases they used their best judgment.

[Page VII]

Editorial treatment of the documents published in the Foreign Relations series follows Office style guidelines, supplemented by guidance from the Editor in Chief and the chief technical editor. The source text is reproduced as exactly as possible, including marginalia or other notations, which are described in the footnotes. Obvious typographical errors are corrected, but other mistakes and omissions in the source text are corrected by bracketed insertions: a correction is set in italic type; an omission in roman type. Bracketed insertions are also used to indicate text that has been omitted because it deals with an unrelated subject (in roman type) or because it remained classified after the declassification review process (in italic type). The amount of material not declassified has been noted by indicating the number of lines or pages of source text that were omitted. All ellipses and brackets that appear in the source text are so identified by footnotes.

The first footnote to each document indicates the document's source, original classification, distribution, and drafting information. The source footnote also provides the background of important documents and policies and indicates if the President and/or his major policy advisers read it. Every effort has been made to determine if a document has been previously published and this information has been included in the source footnote. If two or more different accounts of a meeting or event of comparable value are available and one or more is already declassified and published, the editors chose to print the still unpublished one and obtain its declassification.

Editorial notes and additional annotation summarize pertinent material not printed in this volume, indicate the location of additional documentary sources, provide references to important related documents printed in other volumes, describe key events, and summarize and provide citations to public statements that supplement and elucidate the printed documents. Information derived from memoirs and other first-hand accounts has been used when applicable to supplement the official record.

Declassification Review Procedures

Declassification review of the documents selected for publication was conducted by the Division of Historical Documents Review, Bureau of Diplomatic Security, Department of State. The review was made in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act, the Privacy Act, and the criteria established in Executive Order 12356 regarding:

1)
military plans, weapons, or operations;
2)
the vulnerabilities or capabilities of systems, installations, projects, or plans relating to the national security;
3)
foreign government information;
4)
intelligence activities (including special activities), or intelligence sources or methods;
5)
foreign relations or foreign activities of the United States;
6)
scientific, technological, or economic matters relating to national security;
7)
U.S. Government programs for safeguarding nuclear materials or facilities;
8)
cryptology; and
9)
a confidential source.

Declassification decisions entailed concurrence of the appropriate geographic and functional bureaus in the Department of State, other concerned agencies of the U.S. Government, and appropriate foreign governments regarding documents of those governments. The principle guiding declassification review is to release as much information as is consistent with contemporary requirements of national security and sound foreign relations.

Edward C. Keefer compiled and edited the volume under the supervision of Charles S. Sampson, the Vietnam project leader, and Editor in Chief John P. Glennon. Suzanne E. Coffman of the Office of the Historian prepared the lists of names and abbreviations. Rita M. Baker performed the technical editing. Barbara A. Bacon of the Publishing Services Division (Paul M. Washington, Chief) oversaw production of the volume. Max Franke prepared the index.

William Z. Slany
The Historian
Bureau of Public Affairs
[Page IX] [Page [X]] [Page XI]

List of Sources

Unpublished Sources

  • Department of State
    1.

    Subject-Numeric Indexed Central Files. In February 1963, the Department changed its decimal central files to a subject-numeric central file system. This volume and its companion, volume III, are the first to be published in the Foreign Relations series in which the Department's central files come exclusively from the new system. As part of the transition from the old to two system, the Department of State encouraged its indexers to cross references extensively and to include the first page of the referenced document in the cross referenced file. The system allows the researcher to begin in a basic file and by noting the cross references discover other pertinent files.

    The subject-numeric system was divided into broad categories: Administration, Consular, Culture and Information, Economic, Political and Defense, Science, and Social. Within each of these divisions were subcategories. For example, Political and Defense contained four subtopics: POL (politics), DEF (Defense), CSM (Communism), and INT (Intelligence). Numerical subdivisions further defined them. For example, POL 15-1 was used for documentation concerning the head of state and/or the Executive Branch of any country. Therefore POL 15-1 S VIET contains documentation on South Vietnam's President; POL 15-1 CAMB would contain documentation of Cambodia's Head of State, Prince Norodom Sihanouk.

    The following were the principal files used in this volume:

    • POL S VIET and POL 1 S VIET, both containing background material for general policy
    • POL 2 S VIET, general reports and statistics
    • POL 14 S VIET, elections
    • POL 15 S VIET, government
    • POL 15-1 S VIET, head of government/Executive branch
    • POL 16 S VIET, recognition of the new government
    • POL 18 S VIET, provincial and municipal government
    • POL 26 S VIET, undesignated but used in Vietnam for coup planning
    • POL 27 S VIET, military operations
    • POL 27-10 S VIET, chemical weapons
    • POL 30-1 S VIET, asylum.
    • POL 27 VIET, military operations
    • POL 32-4 VIET, territorial waters
    • The system could also combine two countries or a country and an individual. Files of these types cited in this volume were:
    • POL 8 S VIET-US, U.S.-South Vietnamese discussions of neutralism and non-alignment
    • POL US-MCNAMARA and POL 7 US-MCNAMARA, documentation relating to the Secretary of Defense generally and to his trips
    • POL CAMB-S VIE T, general South Vietnamese-Cambodian relations
    • POL 27-13 CAMB, Cambodia's neutrality in the Vietnam war

    The POL Files comprise the most cited sources in the volume, but there are other files containing important documentation. Much of the documentation on the Buddhist opposition to the Diem government are found in the social category, SOC (social relations) 12-1 S VIET, churches and sects including clergy (bonzes) and SOC 14-1 S VIET, general human rights policies in South Vietnam. Most military-related documents were in DEF 19 S VIET, the general file for military assistance to Vietnam or in DEF 19 US-S VIET, U.S. military assistance to South Vietnam. The CSM S VIET file was surprisingly sparse, indicating that it was little used by indexers during this period. Documentation on economic assistance was found almost exclusively in AID (US) S VIET ORG 7 OSD is a administrative file used for the visits of Secretary of Defense McNamara; PER-LODGE, HENRY CABOT is Ambassador Lodge's personnel file; INF 8 US is the basic psychological operations file; FT 1 S VIET is the general policy file for South Vietnam's finances.

    2.
    Lot Files. Documents from the central files have been supplemented by materials from decentralized of fice files, the lot files of the Department of State. A list of the major lot files used or consulted follows:
    • Bundy Files: Lot 85 D 240
      • Files of William R Bundy for the 1960s, first as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs and then Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs after 1964.
    • Conference Files: Lot 66 D 110
      • Collection of documentation on international conferences abroad attended by the President, the Secretary of State, and other U.S. officials, May 1961-December 1964
    • Har-Van Files
      • Files created for Ambassador Averell Harriman and Cyrus Vance, Delegates to the Paris Peace Conference in 1968. Background documents beginning in the early 1960s. The file contains texts of documents found nowhere else.
    • Presidential Correspondence: Lot 66 D 204
      • Exchanges of correspondence between the President and heads of foreign governments, 1953-1964, as maintained by the Executive Secretariat.
    • Presidential Memoranda of Conversation: Lot 66 D 149
      • Cleared memoranda of Presidential conversations with foreign victors, 1956-1964, as maintained by the Executive Secretariat.
    • Rusk Files: Lot 72 D 192
      • Files of Secretary of State Dean Rusk 1961-1969, including texts of speeches, miscellaneous correspondence files, White House correspondence, chronological files, and memoranda of telephone conversations.
    • Secretary's Memoranda of Conversation: Lot 65 D 330
      • Memoranda of the Secretaries of State and Under Secretaries of State, 1961-1964
    • Secretary's Staff Meetings: Lot 66 D 147
      • Records of the Seaetary of State's Staff Meetings, 1961-1963, and additional ad hoc meetings, reports, papers, and memoranda of Chester Bowles' telephone conversations.
    • S/P Files: Lot 70 D 199
      • Files of the Policy Planning Council for the years 1963-1964.
    • Special Group for Counterinsurgency Files: Lot 68 D 451
      • Minutes and memoranda of the Special Group for Counterinsurgency, January 1962-December 1963.
    • S/S-NSC Files: Lot 70 D 265
      • Master set of papers pertaining to National Security Council meetings, including policy papers, position papers, and administrative documents for the years 1961-1966, as maintained by the Executive Secretariat.
    • S/S-NSC Files: Lot 72 D 316
      • Master file of National Security Action Memoranda (NSAMs) for the years 1961-1968, as maintained by the Executive Secretariat.
    • S/S-NSC (Miscellaneous) Files: Lot 66 D 95
      • Administrative and miscellaneous National Security Council documentation, including NSC Records of Action, 1947-1963, as maintained by the Executive Secretariat.
    • Vietnam Working Group Files: Lot 67 D 54
      • Files of the interagency Vietnam Working Group, 1963-1964.
    • Vietnam Working Group Files: Lot 72 D 219
      • Top Secret files of the interagency Vietnam Working Group, 1963-1967.
  • National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.
    • Record Group 46, Records of the U.S. Senate
      • Files of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
    • Record Group 59
      • Files of the Office of Public Opinion Studies, Bureau of Public Affairs, Department of State
  • Washington National Records Center, Suitland, Maryland
  • Record Group 84, Records of the Foreign Service Posts of the United States
    • Saigon Embassy Files: FRC 67 A 677
      • Classified records of the Embassy in Saigon for the years 1962-1963 (formerly Lot 66 F 57).
    • Saigon Embassy Files: FRC 68 A 5159
      • Top Secret files of the Embassy in Saigon for the years 1955-1963.
  • Record Group 306, Records of the United States Information Agency
    • USIA/TOP Files: FRC 67 A 222
      • Subject files of the Office of Policy for the years 1963-1965.
  • Record Group 330, Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense
    • McNamara Files: FRC 31 A 3470
      • Files of Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara for the years 1961-1968.
    • OSD Files: FRC 69 A 3131
      • Official records of the Secretary of Defense, Deputy Secretary of Defense, and Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary for 1963.
    • OSD Files: FRC 71 A 6489
      • Miscellaneous records of the Secretary, Deputy Secretary of Defense, and their assistants for the years 1951,n.1966.
  • Record Group 334, Records of Interservice
    • Records of the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, 1962 and after.
  • National Defense University, Fort McNair, Washington, D.C.
    • Taylor Papers
      • Papers of General Maxwell D. Taylor, Chief of Staff of the Army, 1955-1959; Military Adviser to the President, 1961-1962; Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1962-1964.
  • John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Hilsman Papers
    • National Security Files
      • Chester V. Clifton Series
      • Departments and Agencies Series
      • Meetings and Memoranda Series
      • Regional Security Series
      • Trip and Conference Series
      • Country Series, Vietnam
    • President's Appointment Book (cited as President's Log Book)
    • President's Office Files
      • Staff Memoranda
      • Vietnam Security
    • Schlesinger Papers
    • Sorensen Papers
    • Thompson Papers
  • Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Austin, Texas
    • Papers of President Lyndon B. Johnson, National Security File
      • Heads of State Correspondence
      • Meeting Notes
      • Memos to the President, McGeorge Bundy
      • NSAMs
      • Country File, Vietnam
    • Rusk Appointment Book
    • Vice Presidential Security File
  • Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.
    • Harriman Papers
      • Special Files of W. Averell Harriman, Public Service, Kennedy and Johnson administrations.

Published Sources

  • Documentary Collection, Congressional Documents, and Periodicals
    • The Declassified Documents Quarterly Catalog and microfiche. Woodbridge, CT: Research Publications (formerly Washington: Carrollton Press), 1977 onwards.
    • The Pentagon Papers: The Department of Defense History of United States Decisionmaking on Vietnam [The Senator Gravel Edition]. 4 vols. Boston: Beacon Press, 1971.
    • U.S. Department of Defense. United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967 [The Pentagon Papers]. 12 vols. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971.
    • U.S. Department of State. American Foreign Policy: Current Documents, 1963. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1967.
    • _____, Department of State Bulletin, 1963. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1963.
    • U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F. Kennedy, 1963. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1964.
    • U.S. Senate. Alleged Assassination Plots Involving Foreign Leaders. An Interim Report of the Select Committee To study Government Operations with respect to Intelligence Activities. U.S. Senate, 94th Congress, 1st Session, Report No. 94-465. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975.
  • Memoirs
    • Note: The Department of State takes no responsibility for the accuracy of these memoirs nor endorses their interpretation of the events.
    • Ball, George. The Past Has Another Pattern: Memoirs. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1982.
    • Colby, William, and Forbath, Peter. Honorable Men: My Life in the CIA . New York: Simon and Schuster, 1978.
    • Galbraith, John Kenneth. Ambassador's Journal: A Personal Account of the Kennedy Years. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1969.
    • Hilsman, Roger. To Move a Nation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday 6, Co., Z967.
    • Johnson, Lyndon Baines. The Vantage Point: Perspectives of the Presidency, 1963-1969. New York: Holt, Reinhardt and Winston, 1971.
    • Mecklin, John. Mission in Torment. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1965.
    • Nolting, Frederick E. From Trust to Tragedy: The Political Memoirs of Frederick Nolting, Kennedy's Ambassador to Diem's Vietnam. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1988.
    • Salinger, Pierre. With Kennedy. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1966.
    • Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. A Thousand Days: John F Kennedy in the White House. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965.
    • Sorensen, Theodore C. Kennedy. New York: Harper & Row, 1965.
    • Taylor, Maxwell D. Swords and Plowshares: A Memoir. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1972.
    • Tran Van Don. Our Endless War: Inside Vietnam. San Raphael, CA: Presidio Press, 1978.
[Page XVII]

List of Abbreviations

  • AAA, anti-aircraft artillery
  • ABN, airborne
  • AC&W, aircraft control and warning
  • ACSI, Assistant Chief of Staff (Intelligence)
  • addee, addressee
  • Admino, series indicator for administrative telegrams from CINCPAC
  • AF, Air Force
  • AFCIN, Air Force Chief of Intelligence
  • AFRS, Armed Forces Radio Service
  • AID, Agency for International Development
  • Aidto, series indicator for telegrams from the Agency for International Development to its missions abroad
  • Amb, Ambassador
  • ammo, ammunition
  • AP, Associated Press
  • APC, armored personnel carrier
  • ARPAC, U.S. Army, Pacific
  • ARVN, Army of the Republic of Vietnam
  • BG, Brigadier General
  • bn, battalion
  • CAS, Controlled American Source
  • CG, Civil Guard
  • ChiCom, Chinese Communists
  • ChiNat, Chinese Nationalist
  • CHMAAG, Chief, Military Assistance Advisory Group
  • CI, counterinsurgency; commercial imports
  • CIA, Central Intelligence Agency
  • CIB, Combined Intelligence Board
  • CIDG, Citizen's Irregular Defense Group
  • CINCPAC, Commander in Chief, Pacific
  • CINCPACAF, Commander in Chief, Pacific Air Force
  • CINCPACFLT, Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet
  • CINCUSAPAC, Commander in Chief, United States Army, Pacific
  • CIP, Commercial Import Program
  • CM, Chairman's Memorandum
  • Cmdr, Commander
  • CNO, Chief of Naval Operations
  • CO, Commanding Officer
  • COMUSARPAC, Commander, United States Army, Pacific
  • COMUSMACV, Commander, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
  • CONUS, continental United States
  • COPROR, Committee on Province Rehabilitation
  • CPSVN, Comprehensive Plan for South Vietnam
  • CSA, Chief of Staff, Army
  • CSAF, Chief of Staff, Air Force
  • CSCC, Coastal Surveillance Command Center
  • CT, Country Team
  • CVN, Central Vietnam
  • CVTC, Confederation of Vietnamese Trade Congresses
  • CY, calendar year
  • DA, Department of the Army; Defense Attaché; defense assistance
  • DAC, Development Assistance Committee, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
  • DCFBA, Director General of Budget and Foreign Aid
  • DCI, Director of Central Intelligence
  • DCM, Deputy Chief of Mission
  • Deptel, Department of State telegram
  • desp, despatch
  • DGI, Director General of Information
  • DIA, Defense Intelligence Agency
  • dissem, dissemination
  • DLF, Defense Loan Fund
  • DMZ, demilitarized zone
  • DOD, Department of Defense
  • DOD/PRO, Public Relations Office, Department of Defense
  • DRV, Democratic Republic of Vietnam
  • DTG, date-time-group
  • E & E, emergency and evacuation
  • ECCO, Eastern Construction Company
  • Embtel, Embassy telegram
  • FAR, Forces Armees Royales (Royal Armed Forces, Laos)
  • FBIS, Foreign Broadcast Information Service
  • FE, Far East; Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
  • FOS, follow-on spares
  • FRC, Federal Records Center
  • FSO, Foreign Service officer
  • FY, fiscal year
  • FYI, for your information
  • G, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
  • GAO, General Accounting Office
  • G/PM, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Politico-Military Affairs
  • GVN, Government of Vietnam
  • helo, helicopter
  • HQS, headquarters
  • HSAS, Headquarters, Support Activity, Saigon
  • IAF, Far East Branch, United States Information Agency
  • ICA, International Cooperation Administration
  • ICC, International Control Commission
  • ICSH, International Committee on Strategic Hamlets
  • ILO, International Labor Organization
  • INR, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Department of State
  • IOP, Office of Policy and Research, United States Information Agency
  • ISA, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs
  • JAOC, Joint Air Operation Center
  • JCS, Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • JGS, Joint General Staff
  • JOC, Joint Operations Center
  • KIA, killed in action
  • LAS, Long-Range Assistance Strategy
  • LOC, lines of communication
  • MA, military assistance
  • MAAG, Military Assistance Advisory Group
  • MACV, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
  • MAP, Military Assistance Program
  • MEC, Military Executive Committee
  • MRC, Military Revolutionary Council
  • MSP, Mutual Security Program
  • NACO, National Agricultural Credit Office
  • NBC, National Broadcasting Company
  • NCO, non-commissioned officer
  • NCP, National Campaign Plan
  • NEA, Near East and Africa; Bureau of Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs, Department of State
  • NFLSVN, National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam
  • Niact, night action
  • NIE, National Intelligence Estimate
  • NLHX, Neo Lao Hak Xat
  • NOA, new obligational authority
  • Noforn, no foreign dissemination
  • NRM, National Revolutionary Movement
  • NSA, National Security Agency
  • NSAM, National Security Action Memorandum
  • NSC, National Security Council
  • NVN, North Vietnam
  • OASD, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense
  • OCI, Office of Current Intelligence
  • ODMA, Office of the Director for Military Assistance
  • OPCON, operational control
  • OPNL, operational
  • OPSUM, Operations Summary
  • P, piaster; Bureau of Public Affairs, Department of State
  • PACAF, Pacific Air Force
  • PACFLT, Pacific Fleet
  • PACOM, Pacific Command
  • PAO, Public Affairs Officer
  • PCHT, packing, crating, handling, and
  • transportation PIC, person in command
  • P10, Public Information Officer
  • PIOPS, public information operations
  • PL, Pathet Lao; Public Law
  • plt, platoon
  • PNG, persona non grata
  • POL, petroleum, oil, and lubricants
  • POLAD, Political Adviser
  • POW, prisoner of war
  • psywar, psychological warfare
  • psyops, psychological operations
  • PTT, post, telephone, telegraph
  • reftel, reference telegram
  • RG, Record Group
  • rgt, regiment
  • RKG, Royal Khmer Government
  • RLG, Royal Lao Government
  • RVN, Republic of Vietnam
  • RVNAF, Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces
  • S, Office of the Secretary of State
  • SACSA, Special Assistant for Counterinsurgency and Special Activities, Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • SDC, Self-Defense Corps
  • SEA, Southeast Asia; Office of Southeast Asian Affairs, Department of State
  • SEATO, Southeast Asia Treaty Organization
  • SecDef, Secretary of Defense
  • Secto, series indicator for telegrams from the Secretary of State or his party to the Department of State
  • Secy, Secretary
  • SEPES, Service des Etudes Politigues et Sociales (Political and Social Studies Service)
  • septel, separate telegram
  • SFHCVN, Special Forces, High Command, Vietnam
  • SH, Strategic Hamlet
  • SOA, Office of South Asian Affairs, Department of State
  • S/P, Policy Planning Staff, Department of State
  • sqdn, squadron
  • S/S, Executive Secretariat, Department of State
  • Stat., United States Statutes at Large
  • SVN, South Vietnam
  • TF/Saigon, Task Force in Saigon
  • TF/SEA, Task Force on Southeast Asia
  • TF/VN, Task Force on Vietnam
  • TIAS, Treaties and Other International Agreements Series
  • Toeid, series indicator for telegrams to the Agency for International Development from its missions abroad
  • TOC, Tactical Operations Center
  • Tosec, series indicator for telegrams to the Secretary of State or his party from the Department of State
  • Tousi, series indicator for telegrams to the United States Information Agency from its missions abroad
  • UN, United Nations
  • UNESCO, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
  • UPI, United Press International
  • USA, United States Army
  • USAF, United States Air Force
  • USASGV, United States Army Support Group, Vietnam
  • USIA, United States Information Agency
  • USIB, United States Intelligence Board
  • USIS, United States Information Service
  • Usito, series indicator for telegrams from the United States Information Agency to its missions abroad
  • USMACV, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
  • USMC, United States Marine Corps
  • USN, United States Navy
  • USOM, United States Operations Mission
  • USSR, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
  • UST, United States Treaties
  • VC, Viet Cong
  • VM, Viet Minh
  • VN, Vietnam
  • VNAF, Vietnam Armed Forces; Vietnam Air Force
  • VNMC, Vietnam Marine Corps
  • VNN, Vietnam Navy
  • VNQDD, Viet Nam Quoc Dan Dang (National Party of Vietnam)
  • VNSF, Vietnamese Special Forces
  • VNSFHC, Vietnamese Special Forces High Command
  • VOA, Voice of America
  • WG/VN, Working Group on Vietnam
  • WSM, Women's Solidarity Movement

List of Persons

  • Alphand, Herve, French Ambassador to the United States
  • Alsop, Joseph, syndicated columnist
  • Ball, George W., Under Secretary of State
  • Barnett, Robert W., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Economic Affairs from February 3, 1963
  • Bell, David E., Administrator of the Agency for International Development and member of the Counterinsurgency Group
  • Blake, Lieutenant General Gordon A., USAF, Director of the National Security Agency
  • Bohlen, Charles E., Ambassador to France
  • Bowles, Chester A., President's Special Representative, Adviser on African, Asian, and Latin American Affairs, and Ambassador at Large until July 19, 1963; thereafter Ambassador to India
  • Brent, Joseph L., Director, Operations Mission in Vietnam
  • Buffum, William B., Deputy Director of the Office of United Nations Political and Social Affairs, Department of State, until November 10, 1963; thereafter Director
  • Bui Diem, Dai Viet oppositionist
  • Bui Van Luong, Vietnamese Minister of the Interior
  • Bundy, McGeorge, President's Special Assistant for National Security Affairs
  • Bundy, William P., Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs
  • Buu Hoi, Vietnamese Ambassador to the United States
  • Carroll, Lieutenant General Joseph E, USAF, Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Carter, Lieutenant General Marshall S., USA, Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
  • Church, Frank, Democratic Senator from Idaho; member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Cleveland, Harlan, Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs
  • Clifton, Major General Chester V., USA, President's Military Aide
  • Colby, William, Director of the Far East Division, Operations Directorate, Central Intelligence Agency
  • Conlon, Thomas F., Office of Southeast Asian Affairs, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, after September 1, 1963, and member of the Vietnam Working Group
  • Cooper, Chester L., Assistant for Policy Support to the Deputy Director for Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency, until November 1963; thereafter Assistant Deputy Director for Policy Support
  • Couve de Murville, Maurice, French Foreign Minister
  • De Gaulle, Charles, President of France
  • Diem, see Ngo Dinh Diem
  • Dillon, C. Douglas, Secretary of the Treasury
  • Dingeman, Major James W., USA, Executive Secretary of the Special Group for Counterinsurgency
  • Dinh, see Ton That Dinh
  • Do Mau, Colonel, (after November 1963, Brigadier General), ARVN, Military Security Service Chief; also political member of the Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council
  • Do yang Ly, Vietnamese Ambassador to the United States after September 30, 1963.
  • Don, see Tran Van Don
  • D'Orlandi Giovanni, Italian Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam
  • Dungan, Ralph A., President's Special Assistant
  • Duong Ngoc Lam, Colonel, ARVN, Director, Civil Guard/Self Defense Corps
  • Duong Van Hieu, Assistant Director for Special Police of the Republic of Vietnam until November 1, 1963
  • Dueng Van (“Big”) Minh, Major General, (after November 4, 1963, Lieutenant General), ARVN, Military Adviser to President Diem until November 1, 1963; thereafter Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Revolutionary Council; President of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Vietnam after November 4, 1963
  • Dutton, Frederick G., Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Affairs
  • Felt, Admiral Harry D., USN, Commander in Chief, Pacific
  • Forrestal, Michael V., member, National Security Council Staff
  • Fraleigh, Albert S., Deputy Assistant Director for Rural Affairs, Operations Mission in Vietnam
  • Fulbright, J. William, Democratic Senator from Arkansas and Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Gilpatric, Roswell L., Deputy Secretary of Defense and member of the Counterinsurgency Group
  • Halberstam, David, New York Times correspondent in Vietnam
  • Harkins, General Paul D., USA, Commander, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
  • Harriman, W. Averell, Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs until April 3, 1963; thereafter Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and Chairman of the Special Group for Counterinsurgency
  • Helble, John J., Consul in Hue
  • Helms, Richard, Deputy Director for Plans, Central Intelligence Agency
  • Hieu, see Ngo Trong Hieu
  • Higgins, Marguerite, New York Herald Tribune correspondent
  • Hilsman, Roger, Jr., Director of the Bureau of Intelligence and Research until April 25, 1963; thereafter Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs
  • Ho Chi Minh, President of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam; also Chairman and General Secretary of Dang Lao Dong, Workers' Party of Vietnam
  • Hoang Van Lac, Colonel, ARVN, Permanent Commissioner, Interministerial Committee for Strategic Hamlets; Special Commissioner for Strategic Hamlet Program
  • Hughes, Thomas L., Deputy Director of the Bureau of Intelligence and Research until April 28, 1963; thereafter Director
  • Huynh Van Cao, Brigadier General, ARVN, IV Corps Commander
  • Imhof, Johannes, Office of Western European Affairs, Department of State
  • Janow, Seymour J., Assistant Administrator for the Far East, Agency for International Development
  • Johnson, Lyndon B., Vice President until November 22, 1963; thereafter President
  • Johnson, U. Alexis, Deputy Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
  • Jorden, William, Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
  • Kattenburg, Paul M., Deputy Director of the Office of Southeast Asian Affairs, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, and Chairman of the Vietnam Interdepartmental Working Group from August 4, 1963
  • Kaysen, Carl, President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs
  • Kennedy, John F., President of the United States until November 22, 1963
  • Kennedy, Robert E, Attorney General
  • Kent, Colonel J. R., USA, Assistant Director, Far East Region, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs
  • Khanh, see Nguyen Khanh
  • Khiem, see Tran Thien Khiem
  • Khiet, see Tien Khiet
  • Khnong, see Nguyen Khuong
  • Kim, see Le Van Kim
  • Koren, Henry L. T., Director of the Office of Southeast Asian Affairs, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
  • Krulak, Major General Victor H., USMC, Special Assistant for Counterinsurgency and Special Activities, Joint Staff of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • Ky, see Nguyen Cao Ky
  • La, see Nguyen Van La
  • Lac, see Hoang Van Lac
  • Lalouette, Roger, French Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam
  • Lansdale, Maj. Gen. Edward G., USAF, Assistant to the Secretary of Defense
  • Lausche, Frank, Democratic Senator from Ohio and Chairman of the Far Eastern Subcommittee, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Le Quang Trieu, Special Forces Commander after November 1, 1963
  • Le Quang Tung, Colonel, ARVN, Special Forces Commander until November 1, 1963
  • Le Van Kim, Brigadier General, (after November 1, 1963, Major General), ARVN, Secretary General and Foreign Affairs member, Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council, after November 1, 1963
  • Le Van Nghiem, Brigadier General, ARVN, Commander, I Corps
  • Lippmann, Walter, columnist
  • Lodge, Henry Cabot, Jr., Ambassador to South Vietnam from August 26, 1963
  • Luong, see Bui Van Luong
  • Mai Huu Xuan, Brigadier General, (after November 1963, Major General), ARVN, Commander, Quang training camp; member, Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council, after November 1, 1963; Chief of National Police
  • Maneli, Mieczyslaw, Polish member of the International Control Commission
  • Manning, Robert 1., Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs
  • Mansfield, Mike, Democratic Senator from Montana; Majority Leader and member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Mau, see Vu Van Mau
  • McCone, John A., Director of Central Intelligence
  • McNamara, Robert S., Secretary of Defense
  • Mecklin, John, Counselor for Public Affairs at the Embassy in Vietnam
  • Mendenhall, Joseph A., United Nations Adviser, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, from June 23, 1963
  • Minh, see Duong Van Minh
  • Montgomery, James M., Office of Southeast Asian Affairs, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, and member of the Vietnam Working Group
  • Morse, Wayne, Democratic Senator from Oregon and member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Murrow, Edward R., Director, United States Information Agency
  • Nes, David G., Deputy Chief of Mission in Saigon from December 1963
  • Nghiem, see Le Van Nghiem
  • Ngo Dinh Can, brother of President Diem
  • Ngo Dinh Diem, President of the Republic of Vietnam until November 1, 1963
  • Ngo Dinh Luyen, brother of President Diem; Ambassador of the Republic of Vietnam to the United Kingdom until November 2, 1963
  • Ngo Dinh Nhu, brother of President Diem; Presidential Counselor and Head of the Interministerial Committee for Strategic Hamlets until November 1, 1963
  • Ngo Dinh Nhu, Madame (Tran Le Xuan), wife of Ngo Dinh Nhu and member of the Vietnamese National Assembly; official hostess for President Diem
  • Ngo Dinh Thuc, brother of President Diem; Archbishop of Hue
  • Ngo Trong Hieu, Vietnamese Minister of Civic Action until November 1, 1963
  • Nguyen Cao Ky, Lieutenant Colonel, Vietnamese Air Force, Transport Squadron Commander; Air Force Commander from December 17, 1963
  • Nguyen Dinh Thuan, Vietnamese Secretary of State at the Presidency and Assistant Secretary of State for National Defense
  • Nguyen Khanh, Major General, ARVN, Commander of II Corps until November 29 1963; thereafter Commander of IV Corps
  • Nguyen Khuong, Colonel, ARVN, coup leader
  • Nguyen Luong, Vietnamese Minister of Finance
  • Nguyen Ngoc Tho, Vietnamese Vice President until November 4, 1963; thereafter Prime Minister and Minister of Finance and National Economy of the Provisional Government
  • Nguyen Van La, Major General, ARVN, Civil Guard Commander
  • Nguyen Van Thieu, Colonel, (Brigadier General after November 1, 1963), ARVN, Commanding Of 9cer of the 5th Infantry Division
  • Nhu, see Ngo Dinh Nhu
  • Nhu, Madame, see Ngo Dinh Nhu, Madame
  • Nolting, Frederick E., Jr., Ambassador to Vietnam until August 15, 1963
  • Pham Dang Lam, Secretary General of the Vietnamese Foreign Ministry until November 4, 1963; thereafter Foreign Minister in the Provisional Government
  • Pham Van Dong, Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam
  • Phan Huy Quat, former Vietnamese Defense Minister under Bao Dai and leader of Dai Viet Party
  • Phillips, Rufus C., Assistant Director for Rural Affairs, Operations Mission in Vietnam
  • Reston, James, syndicated columnist
  • Rice, Edward E., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs
  • Richardson, John H., Chief of Central Intelligence Agency Station in Saigon until October 5, 1963
  • Rostow, Walt W., Counselor of the Department of State and Chairman of the Policy Planning Council
  • Rusk, Dean, Secretary of State
  • Salinger, Pierre E. G., President's Press Secretary
  • Schlesinger, Arthur, Jr., President's Special Assistant
  • Sheehan, Neil, United Press International correspondent in Vietnam
  • Sihanouk, Prince Norodom, Cambodian Chief of State
  • Smith, Bromley, Executive Secretary of the National Security Council
  • Souvanna Phouma, Laotian Prime Minister
  • Stevenson, Adlai Representative at the United Nations
  • Stilwell, Major General Richard G., USA, Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, from April 1963
  • Stoneman, Walter G., Director of the Office of Vietnam Affairs, Bureau for the Far East/Vietnam, Agency for International Development
  • Sullivan, William H., U.N. Adviser, Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, until April 28, 1963; thereafter Assistant to the Under Secretary of State
  • Sylvester, Arthur, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs
  • Tam Chau, bonze, member of Buddhist delegation from Hue; became Chairman of the Intersect Committee for the Defense of Buddhism
  • Taylor, General Maxwell D., Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • Tho, see Nguyen Ngoc Tho
  • Thompson, Brigadier Robert G. K., head of the British Advisory Mission in Vietnam
  • Thuan, see Nguyen Dinh Thuan
  • Thuc, see Ngo Dinh Thuc
  • Timmes, Major General Charles, Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Vietnam
  • Tinh Khiet, chief bonze in Hue
  • Ton That Dinh, Major General, ARVN, Military Governor of Saigon, August 21-November 1, 1963; thereafter Commander of III Corps, Second Deputy Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council, and Minister of Public Security of the Provisional Government
  • Tran Kim Tuyen, head of the Service des Etudes Politiques et Sociales
  • Tran Le Quang, Vietnamese Minister of Rural Affairs until November 4, 1963; thereafter Minister of Rural Affairs of the Provisional Government
  • Tran Le Xuan, see Ngo Dinh Nhu, Madame
  • Tran Thien Khiem, General, ARVN, Chief of Staff after November 1, 1963, Military Affairs member, Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council
  • Tran Tu Oai Brigadier General, ARVN, Director of Psychological Warfare, Vietnamese Ministry of Defense; Chief of Public Information; Minister of Information in the Provisional Government after November 4, 1963
  • Tran Van Chuong, Vietnamese Ambassador to the United States until August 22, 1963
  • Tran Van Don, Major General, ARVN, Commander of III Corps until July 1963; thereafter Commander of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam; Acting Chief of the Joint General Staff after August 1963; First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Military Revolutionary Council after November 1, 1963; Minister of National Defense after November 4, 1963
  • Tri Quang, bonze, Buddhist opposition leader
  • Trueheart, William C., Minister-Counselor and Deputy Chief of Mission in Vietnam
  • Tung, see Le Quang Tung
  • Tuyen, see Tran Kim Tuyen
  • Unna Warren, Washington Post correspondent
  • Vu Van Mau, Vietnamese Foreign Minister until August 22, 1963; Ambassador to the United Kingdom after December 24, 1963
  • Wheeler, General Earle G., USA, Chief of Staff
  • Xuan, see Mai Huu Xuan
  • Zablocki, Clement J., Democratic Representative from Wisconsin and member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee
[Page [XXVI]] [Page 1]

Vietnam


367. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in Vietnam

Source: Department of State, Central Files, POL 27 S VIET. Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Conlon, cleared by Harriman, and approved by Hilsman. Repeated to Paris for Rusk and to CINCPAC for POLAD.


368. Central Intelligence Agency Information Report

Source: Johnson Library, National Security File, Vietnam Memos. Secret, Routine No Foreign Dissem/No Dissem Abroad/Controlled Dissem Background Use Only. A note on the source text indicates this information was acquired in Saigon December 8-14. Forrestal sent this report to Bundy under cover of a memorandum, December 17 which reads as follows:

“The attached is as good a wrap-up on the Vietnam situation as I have seen in the last few days. The President might be interested.” Also published in Declassified Documents, 1975, 57B.


369. Report on the Situation in Long An Province

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, McNamara Files: FRC 71-1-3470, 12/19-12/20/63, SVN Visit. Confidential. Authorship of this report is not given, but a note in Lodge's handwriting on the source text reads: “By an intelligent American who recently visited Long An and doesn't want to sign his name.” It was handed to McNamara in Saigon by Lodge.


370. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, McNamara Files: FRC 71-A-4370, 12/19-12/20/63 SVN Visit. Secret; Limited Distribution. Presumably drafted by Lodge who signed it. Sent to Washington in telegraphic form in telegram 1192 from Saigon, December 20. (Department of State, Central Files, POL 7 US/MCNAMARA)


371. Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs (Hilsman) to the Secretary of State

Source: Department of State, Vietnam Working Group Files: Lot 67 D 54, POL 1 General Political. Secret. Drafted by Joseph W. Neubert, Koren, Conlon, and Montgomery and signed by Hilsman. A note on the source text indicates that Rusk saw this memorandum.


372. Report by the Joint Chiefs of Staff's Special Assistant for Counterinsurgency and Special Activities (Krulak)

Source: Kennedy Library, Hilsman Papers, Countries Series-Vietnam. Secret. Hilsman wrote the following note on a cover sheet: “This is Brute Krulak's report, probably TS.”


373. Memorandum for the Record by the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs' Special Assistant (Sullivan)

Source: Kennedy Library, Hilsman Papers, Countries Series-Vietnam. Top Secret. A note on the source text indicates this was Hilsman's personal copy.


374. Memorandum From the Secretary of Defense (McNamara) to President Johnson

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, McNamara Files: FRC 71-A-3470, South Vietnam, McNamara Statement. Secret. The signed original is in the Johnson Library, National Security File, Vietnam Country File, Memos and Misc. Also printed in Pentagon Papers: Gravel Edition, Vol. 11, pp. 494-496.


375. Letter From the Director of Central Intelligence (McCone) to President Johnson

Source: Johnson Library, National Security File, Vietnam Country File, Memos and Misc. Secret.


377. Letter From the Ambassador in Laos (Unger) to the Secretary of Defense (McNamara)

Source: Washington National Records Center, OSD Files: FRC 69-A-3131, Vietnam 381. Secret. A note on the source text indicates that McNamara saw this letter.


378. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs' Special Assistant (Jorden) to the Under Secretary (Harriman)

Source: Department of State, S/P Files: Lot 70 D 199, Vietnam 1963. Confidential.


379. Message From President Johnson to the Ambassador in Vietnam (Lodge)

Source: Johnson Library, National Security File, Heads of State Correspondence, General Minh Corres. Secret; Eyes Only. Transmitted to Saigon eyes only for Ambassador Lodge in telegram CAP 63663, which is the source text. The telegram was sent to the LBJ Ranch on December 30 for approval. (Draft telegram from Bundy to the President; ibid.)


380. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in Vietnam

Source: Department of State, Central Files, POL 27 S VIET. Secret Flash. Drafted by James M. Montgomery of the Vietnam Working Group, cleared by Forrestal, and approved by Hilsman. A draft of the letter to Minh, a draft of the oral presentation, and a covering memorandum from Rusk to the President were prepared by Mendenhall on December 26. Rusk took the drafts and the memorandum to the LBJ Ranch in Texas on December 27 where the President approved them. Rusk's memorandum to the President reads in part as follows:

“As a follow-up to Secretary McNamara's visit to Viet-Nam, we recommend a Presidential message to General Duong Van Minh, Chairman of the Military Revolutionary Council in Viet-Nam, stressing the urgency of action to reverse the adverse trend in the war as well as reaffirming the United States policy of complete support for the Vietnamese Government. At the same time public uneasiness and confusion in both the United States and Viet-Nam necessitate a highly authoritative statement of United States war aims, intentions regarding the withdrawal of military personnel, and policy on neutralization.” (Ibid.)

To meet these two purposes, the memorandum recommended the letter to General Minh and a “supplementary message” to be delivered orally by Lodge.


381. Telegram From the Embassy in Vietnam to the Department of State

Source: Department of State, Central Files, POL 15-1 S VIET. Confidential; Limit Distribution. Repeated to CINCPAC.


382. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs' Special Assistant (Sullivan) to the Under Secretary (Harriman)

Source: Library of Congress, Harriman Papers, Vietnam-Policy. Secret. William A. Harbin, Harriman's Staff Assistant, wrote the following note on the source text for Sullivan: “Gov thinks this very good, asks if we should do anything about it now, or just file it?” Sullivan indicated that it should be filed.


383. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs' Special Assistant (Jorden) to the Under Secretary (Harriman)

Source: Department of State, Vietnam Working Group Files: Lot 67 D 54, POL 1, General Political. Secret. A note on the source text indicates that it was Hilsman's copy. Hilsman in turn sent it to the Vietnam Working Group for action.


Contents

[Page 759]

Index